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October, 2012 |

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Patented Grub Hub Camp Kitchen Makes Fall Camping Trips a Pleasure

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Grub Hub Camp Kitchen

The single biggest challenge to most camping trips is organizing the kitchen gear.

Leeds, UT (PRWEB) October 31, 2012

Fall is a great time to enjoy camping with the family while pursuing outdoor activities such as hiking, biking, photography, hunting, fishing, climbing, geo-caching, canoeing, beach combing and many other activities. September, October and November bring cool nights and bright clear days that are perfect for enjoying the outdoors. Besides the great weather, and colorful scenery with the changing leaves, there is also usually less traffic than in summer and fewer people to compete with for camp sites.

Time is more limited however with the kids in school and the shorter days. So making the most of a camping weekend requires planning and the right equipment. According to Montana landscape and wildlife photographer, Eric Kottmann, “The single biggest challenge to most camping trips is organizing the kitchen gear. The tent and sleeping bags are easy to load but give a false sense of progress since the real challenge is packing pots and pans, stove, fuel, lantern, cooking oil, condiments, matches, dish soap, scrubby, utensils, can opener, paper towels, and a myriad of other items that make eating outdoors pleasurable. The Grub Hub is a huge help. With all gear stowed inside, the unit rolls easily from home to vehicle to campsite and the only thing left to organize is meals.”

Kottmann adds, “The Grub Hub’s table space, organizers and support for the stove and lighting make it easy to cook really good food outdoors. The included sink and air dry bags also make quick work of dishes.”

With limited time to travel to a favorite outdoor area and establish camp, it is important to have a system that is easy to set up. The Grub Hub takes less than about 3 minutes to set up and offers the ability to be cooking a real meal in less than 5 minutes. Grub Hub inventor, Joe Baughman states, “The product’s goal is to be easy to set up and use while provide totally functional outdoor workspace with the highest level of organization and portability possible.”

Some accessories, (such as the stove, lantern water bladder and spatulas) are shown only to illustrate usage. They are not included with the standard product.

GrubHubUSA was established in 2004 and based in Leeds, UT. The company manufactures the Grub Hub brand camp kitchen and related accessories for multiple selling channels. The company’s tortoise-like logo, and the tag line “Take it With You”, make an obvious match for the product. Folded for transport, Grub Hub® work stations have a compact profile with hard plastic tables around the back and sides loosely resemble a tortoise’s shell.

GrubHubUSA is developing additional products and camp kitchen accessories including gravity fed water delivery system and a soft sided cooler that fits inside the Grub Hub®.

For more information online: http://www.grubhubusa.com, http://www.twitter.com/grubhubusa, http://www.facebook.com/grubhubusa.

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Treasures: Will ‘May Flower’ dishes bring bouquet of riches?

 

Dear Helaine and Joe:

My daughter inherited some dishes from her grandmother. The pattern is “May Flower” by Vernon Kilns and she has a service for eight with extra pieces such as a gravy boat, meat platter, vegetable serving bowls, coffee pot, creamer and sugar. I have tried unsuccessfully to find out the value and hope you can help.

Thank you,

F. B., Naples, Fla.

Dear F. B.:

The Poxon China Co. was founded in 1912, and was located on a ranch owned by George Poxon in Vernon, Calif. Initially, the firm made bathroom tiles, and few pieces of art pottery.

Around the beginning of World War I, Poxon began manufacturing dinnerware, mainly the type of items used in hotels and restaurants. Poxon China was sold to Faye Bennison in 1931, and renamed “Vernon Kilns.”

Unfortunately, the combination of the Great Depression and an earthquake that damaged part of the plant’s infrastructure and destroyed much of its stock made the 1930s a difficult time for Vernon Kilns, but it survived. In the late ’30s, the company hired some important American designers, including Don Blandings, Gale Turnbull and Rockwell Kent, to revamp its lines.

Royal Hickman designed the “Melinda” shaped dinnerware in 1942 and it can be found decorated with several designs, specifically “Fruitdale,” “Monterey” and “May Flower.” These patterns are similar with “Fruitdale” being embellished with representations of fruit and flowers while “May Flower” has only flowers.

These three patterns are comparably priced but examples of “Monterey” seem to be a few dollars cheaper in most cases. Looking at the photograph F. B. enclosed, there are some desirable pieces including the covered vegetable, the coffee pot and the lug-handled chowder bowls.

It needs to be understood that the prices we are about to quote are retail or insurance replacement value, and they should not be construed as the prices that could be obtained if F. B.’s daughter decided to sell her inheritance.

Selling almost any kind of dinnerware can be difficult and the owners of such items are often surprised at how hard it is to find a buyer and how little buyers are willing to pay. We should also point out that this particular set is everyday earthenware and not porcelain or what would be classified as fine china.

The cups and saucers are normally valued at $15 each and the dinner plates $20 each. Salad plates are much less valuable at $10 and the bread-and-butter plates are often quoted at $8 each.

We could not find a quote for the sugar bowl, but it appears that it would be in the $30-to-$35 range while the creamer sells for $18. The lug-handled chowder bowls are $28 each, while the covered vegetable is in the $120-to-$140 range.

The value of the meat plate depends on the diameter. The 12-inch diameter round plate is $18 and the 13-inch is more in the $38 range. The oval platter is $50.

This leaves the coffee pot, which probably retails in the $200-to-$225 range, and we found a record of one selling for $129 in May.

Helaine Fendelman and Joe Rosson are the authors of  “Price It Yourself” (HarperResource, $19.95). Contact them at Treasures in Your Attic, P.O. Box 18350, Knoxville, TN 37928. Email them at treasures@knology.net.

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On Saturday, November 3, Westmoore Pottery will present, "Stepping Back in …

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Yesteryear Cooking

Karen’s program will give a perspective of cooking such as would have been done by the many 18th century settlers of Germanic background. Men and women from Germany were among those who settled in the central part of North Carolina in the 1700s

(PRWEB) October 31, 2012

Karen Becker from Frontier Culture Museum in Staunton, Virginia is the featured historical cook for 2012. She will be demonstrating German peasant cookery from the 1700s, working in the large fireplace at Westmoore Pottery.

“We’re excited to have Karen coming,” says potter Mary Farrell, “and really pleased to be presenting German style cooking for a change.”

Most of Westmoore Pottery’s hearth cooking programs have featured historical cooks more familiar with cookery from a British point-of-view. Karen’s program will give a perspective of cooking such as would have been done by the many 18th century settlers of Germanic background. Men and women from Germany were among those who settled in the central part of North Carolina in the 1700s.

Among other things, Karen will be preparing “gumbis,” which she describes as “the ancestor of crock pot cookery.”

With her typical sense of humor, Karen Becker says she has worked in the field of living history “long enough to be living history!” After getting a degree in biology and being involved in science education for several years, Karen Becker changed gears a bit and began working in the living history field while at Old Salem, in Winston-Salem, NC. She spent a few years at two different sites in South Carolina, then went back to Old Salem for a longer spell. About 16 years ago Karen moved to the Shenandoah Valley of Virginia to work as Costumer/Interpreter at the Frontier Culture Museum in Staunton. She enjoys hearth cooking, and a variety of domestic crafts, as well as costuming, but is especially fond of dairying activities. With her varied background and interests, Karen is definitely one who understands food culture from the field or the animal all the way to the table!

A temporary “raised hearth” will be built in one side of the Westmoore Pottery fireplace, so that Karen Becker can demonstrate how that feature was used in 18th century cooking.

The potters of Westmoore Pottery are well known for their making of historical pottery. Their work has been used to furnish historic buildings in a number of sites, including the Anderson Kitchen of Colonial Williamsburg. Karen Becker will use Westmoore’s wares in her cooking, to demonstrate how various pottery pieces were used in the 18th and early 19th centuries. Pots used will range from the more common bowls, pitchers, and plates to the lesser known pottery pipkins, skillets, and steep pans.

The Hearth Cookery programs are always among Westmoore Pottery’s most popular special events, and attract a wide and varied audience who learn about a part of history that people sometimes forget about — the history of foods, cooking skills, and the daily tasks of those who lived long ago. Food and its preparation is a vehicle through which we can learn much about our long ago ancestors. These programs interest many different types of people – history buffs, cooks, pottery enthusiasts, teachers, reenactors, and lifetime learners.

Westmoore Pottery will be open from 9am to 5pm for the cooking program on Saturday, and Karen will be cooking from 10am to 1pm and from 2pm to 5pm. Visitors may come at any point during the day, and come back as often as they like to see the various foods being cooked. No admission fee will be charged and all visitors are welcome. As the foods are cooked, visitors can sample the finished results.

“We sometimes have people who stay the whole day to watch, ask questions, and learn,” says Mary, “though people are welcome to just come and go as they like. Karen is always such fun, and she has a vast knowledge of cooking. You’ll enjoy coming by to meet her!”

Westmoore Pottery is located at 4622 Busbee Road, just off Highway 705 halfway between the small towns of Seagrove and Robbins, in North Carolina.

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Treasures: Will ‘May Flower’ dishes bring bouquet of riches?

 

Dear Helaine and Joe:

My daughter inherited some dishes from her grandmother. The pattern is “May Flower” by Vernon Kilns and she has a service for eight with extra pieces such as a gravy boat, meat platter, vegetable serving bowls, coffee pot, creamer and sugar. I have tried unsuccessfully to find out the value and hope you can help.

Thank you,

F. B., Naples, Fla.

Dear F. B.:

The Poxon China Co. was founded in 1912, and was located on a ranch owned by George Poxon in Vernon, Calif. Initially, the firm made bathroom tiles, and few pieces of art pottery.

Around the beginning of World War I, Poxon began manufacturing dinnerware, mainly the type of items used in hotels and restaurants. Poxon China was sold to Faye Bennison in 1931, and renamed “Vernon Kilns.”

Unfortunately, the combination of the Great Depression and an earthquake that damaged part of the plant’s infrastructure and destroyed much of its stock made the 1930s a difficult time for Vernon Kilns, but it survived. In the late ’30s, the company hired some important American designers, including Don Blandings, Gale Turnbull and Rockwell Kent, to revamp its lines.

Royal Hickman designed the “Melinda” shaped dinnerware in 1942 and it can be found decorated with several designs, specifically “Fruitdale,” “Monterey” and “May Flower.” These patterns are similar with “Fruitdale” being embellished with representations of fruit and flowers while “May Flower” has only flowers.

These three patterns are comparably priced but examples of “Monterey” seem to be a few dollars cheaper in most cases. Looking at the photograph F. B. enclosed, there are some desirable pieces including the covered vegetable, the coffee pot and the lug-handled chowder bowls.

It needs to be understood that the prices we are about to quote are retail or insurance replacement value, and they should not be construed as the prices that could be obtained if F. B.’s daughter decided to sell her inheritance.

Selling almost any kind of dinnerware can be difficult and the owners of such items are often surprised at how hard it is to find a buyer and how little buyers are willing to pay. We should also point out that this particular set is everyday earthenware and not porcelain or what would be classified as fine china.

The cups and saucers are normally valued at $15 each and the dinner plates $20 each. Salad plates are much less valuable at $10 and the bread-and-butter plates are often quoted at $8 each.

We could not find a quote for the sugar bowl, but it appears that it would be in the $30-to-$35 range while the creamer sells for $18. The lug-handled chowder bowls are $28 each, while the covered vegetable is in the $120-to-$140 range.

The value of the meat plate depends on the diameter. The 12-inch diameter round plate is $18 and the 13-inch is more in the $38 range. The oval platter is $50.

This leaves the coffee pot, which probably retails in the $200-to-$225 range, and we found a record of one selling for $129 in May.

Helaine Fendelman and Joe Rosson are the authors of  “Price It Yourself” (HarperResource, $19.95). Contact them at Treasures in Your Attic, P.O. Box 18350, Knoxville, TN 37928. Email them at treasures@knology.net.

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Stonewall Kitchen opens 10th store in Nashua

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YORK, Maine — Stonewall Kitchen, a leading specialty food manufacturer and retailer, recently opened its 10th company store in the Pheasant Lane Mall in Nashua.

“We are so excited to share our products and passion for food with store guests,” said Jonathan King, president and creative director. “Our new store in Nashua focuses on our core product assortment and highlights select hard goods and accessories.”

The store officially opened Oct. 21 and a grand opening weekend event is scheduled for Saturday and Sunday, Nov. 2 and Nov. 3.

“As 360-degree marketers, an integral part of building our brand is through expanding our retail presence and enhancing the experience for our guests,” King said.

Stonewall Kitchen now has three stores in Maine, four in New Hampshire, two in Connecticut and one in Maryland. Stonewall Kitchen is planning to open its 11th company store in Newburyport, Mass., in November.

Headquartered in York, the manufacturing, retail and wholesale distribution company has been owned and operated by founders King and Jim Stott since 1991. Stonewall Kitchen is known for its innovative product development, beautiful packaging, extraordinary retail spaces and exceptional customer service.

For information, visit www.stonewallkitchen.com.

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The Best Roasting Pans Awarded by "Your Cookware Helper" Are Great to Use …

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Mark Jala

Mark Jala, Founder of Your Cookware Helper

The roasting pan and rack is a multi-function piece of cookware and can be used for many dishes. A quality roasting pan can be used for lasagna, casseroles, and of course, chicken, duck or turkey.

Roanoke, Virginia (PRWEB) October 31, 2012

With Thanksgiving and Christmas just around the corner, many home cooks will dust off their roasting pans and racks for the holiday bird. Unfortunately, the ever so useful roasting pan will be put away for the better part of a year right after the holidays. The roasting pan and rack is a multi-function piece of cookware and can be used for many dishes. A quality roasting pan can be used for lasagna, casseroles, and of course, chicken, duck or turkey.

When selecting a quality roasting pan, Mark Jala, the founder of Your Cookware Helper, has 4 criteria:

1. A good roasting pan will be thick enough not to warp. The key here is not as much warping when roasting, but warping when you deglaze the pan on the stove top. All those juices that drip into the pan make a great starter for a sauce.

2. The next feature I look for is adequate size. While the larger sizes may not fit ovens in smaller apartments or homes, they serve a great purpose being large. The larger size accommodates larger foods and handles huge casseroles.

3. Handles that flare outwards rather than straight up or inward. I’ve used pans that are straight up or inward and I burn myself more often on those than the ones that flare outward.

4. Lastly, I look at heating abilities. When roasting, most of the heat comes from the top. There is still a good amount of heat coming from the bottom, especially if the pan is not full of vegetables. When using a roasting pan for casseroles, the heating qualities are critical.

Mr. Jala awards 2 roasting pans with racks. “The Best Stainless Steel Roasting Pan with Rack award goes to the Cuisinart Multiclad Pro with stainless steel rack. I have some Cuisinart Multiclad Pro and love it. It’s easy to clean, dishwasher safe, and heats exceptionally well,” says Mr. Jala. “With a street price of $75.00 it’s a real bargain.”

The Best Nonstick Roasting Pan with Rack award goes to the Emeril, by All-Clad, anodized aluminum nonstick roasting pan with rack. “Emeril makes excellent cookware with some very user friendly design elements. The anodized aluminum heats very evenly and the nonstick surface is very durable,” says Mr. Jala. “I also like the fact that this nonstick surface is PFOA free. While it still has the PTFE’s from manufacturing, being PFOA free is a big plus for those looking for safe cookware.

The complete Best Roasting Pans article with more details can be found on the Your Cookware Helper website along with other great cookware advice and tips, including last month’s article on 2012 Cookware Trends.

Mark Jala is the founder of Your Cookware Helper and other culinary related websites like Your Cutlery Helper and the Home Cooking Academy. Mr. Jala is writing his first book titled Cook, Talk, Love – How to Nourish Family Relationships During Meal Time. Information about the book can be found on his blog Cook, Talk, Love.

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London cookery school employs KitchenAid products

The Baking Lab features three KitchenAid Twelix ovens, as well as several of KitchenAid’s Stand Mixers. Mayerhofer chose KitchenAid appliances for their professional performance and exceptional results. She also commented that the products are suitable for teaching her students how to create delicious dishes with ease that can be replicated at home.

Juliana Sado, brand marketing manager, KitchenAid, added that KitchenAid’s appliances are specifically developed with input from professional chefs and food technologists to ensure that they offer state of the art culinary techniques.

Twelix oven from KitchenAid features a stainless steel finish with classic controls, curved handle, blue LCD electronic control and screen. The convection system of the oven has two independent semi-circular heating elements alongside an enhanced internal design to improve the airflow and heat distribution in the oven cavity.

The ‘A’ energy rated Twelix oven boasts 73-litre capacity and allows the user to cook three separate dishes on three shelf levels at the same time, without the transfer of flavours or aroma. The multi-function oven with Twelix convection system offers faster pre-heating and up to 10% energy savings and 33 electronic, sensor controlled cooking modes. It also features 23 professional functions.

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