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November, 2012 | - Part 2

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A Fine Mess

In the study, a Regency wash stand-turned-desk and an MR chair by Mies van der Rohe sit under a painting by Rudolf Polanszky.Henry BourneIn the study, a Regency wash stand-turned-desk and an MR chair by Mies van der Rohe sit under a painting by Rudolf Polanszky. See the interactive slideshow

Julia Muggenburg doesn’t keep anything in drawers. In the downstairs library of the house on Thurloe Square in London that she shares with her husband and two children, a guest may find it hard to concentrate, surrounded as he is by a pleasant assault of objects and furnishings: deer antler sculptures by the Austrian artist Christian Eisenberger in the fireplace; walls of meticulously stacked art and design books; and hundreds of colorful glass objects, opalescent shells and fine pottery displayed on antique tables. This room is where Muggenburg, the jewelry designer behind Belmacz, receives guests, on sky blue leather Le Corbusier chairs, for tea served in tiny Japanese clay cups on an inlaid ivory and wood chess table from Syria. The parquet floors are hidden beneath lashings of bright Persian carpets, and ceiling space is shared between a translucent Flos fan and a clear Murano glass chandelier by Barovier Toso. “It’s always been terribly important to be constantly surrounded by things that inspire me,” she says.

Muggenburg moved to London from Germany in 1991 to study sculpture and painting at Central Saint Martins College of Arts and Design. After college she met her husband, a businessman, and opened Belmacz as a gallery and showcase for her playful and ruminative collection of bracelets, earrings, pins and necklaces that fuse contemporary materials like oxidized silver with antique Roman and Indian coins — exactly the sort of unconventional juxtapositions you see here on Thurloe Square.

They bought the house in 2000 and right away Muggenburg set to work putting her mark on it. She loved the tall, narrow proportions of the Georgian architecture, but many of the additions and design details of previous owners had to go. “The house we bought was a faceless, cream-colored environment,” she says. “We ripped out all the superfluous details. We pulled up the fluffy Labrador carpet that covered the floors and discovered beautiful Portland stone.” From there, Muggenburg unleashed her art collection, layering the rooms with a lifetime of antiques and objects in a way that suggests chaos but, in fact, is her method of building tension and harmony.

“The rooms in my house are like 3-D sculptures,” Muggenburg says. “I am always moving around my furniture, pairing objects, or adding, subtracting or relocating things.” The kaleidoscope begins in the foyer, where an overwhelming collection of natural objects, from pangolin shells to whale vertebrae, share every inch of wall space with Georg Baselitz drawings and painted “bones” made of masking tape by her two sons. In the dining room, giant crystals stand in for logs in the fireplace, and a long glass table with Venetian Spatulato verdigris legs plays off the cool gray of the walls. And in the study, which is where her husband spends most of his time, a leather and ivory-inlaid mahogany Regency desk the size of a truck dominates the space. “The room sort of grew around this desk, and everything seems to work,” says Muggenburg, who beneath the desk placed a duct-tape mummy — another Eisenberger work — made by wrapping himself in tape and cutting his way out to leave a brown body-shaped cocoon.

Muggenburg says her taste was informed by her eclectic childhood. She was born in Mettmann, Germany, a town outside of Düsseldorf, and spent a lot of time in the countryside of Wuppertal, on a large piece of land that has been in her family since the 14th century. Her mother owned a small department store, and her father was a philosopher and gentleman of leisure who broke in horses and collected guns. Her mother had a great interest in all things Italian, and twice a year brought her on business trips to Venice, where they met and collaborated with the designer Roberta di Camerino and loaded up on Venetian fabrics and Murano glass. She learned how to sew from the seamstresses at her mother’s department store, and recalls being kept busy with needlework and pottery projects.

Their home had its share of sturdy German wood furniture; but here and there were modern pieces like Marcel Breuer chairs, Archille Castiglioni Taraxacum lights and KPM porcelain. While her youth was tempered by the beauty and malaise of the countryside, it was also fabulously cultured and vibrant. “I’ll never forget when my mother gave me the collected works of Goldoni,” says Muggenburg, referring to the 18th-century Italian playwright. “That, and of course all the jewelers she brought me to all over Italy.”

The sense of her house as a movable feast no doubt comes from Muggenburg’s travels. They show up everywhere: the Gaetano Pesce chairs in the garden came home with her from Turin. The conservatory has glass walls and ceilings covered in gauzy cotton fabric from India that lets in enough sunlight to bleach the books, the giant tortoise shells and the African tribal shields made of elephant and rhino hide. Even in the galley kitchen — a chockablock space that announces its constant use with shiny pots and skillets hanging in great clusters above a large island — every silver colander or shallow pot of honeycomb has some meaning for Muggenburg. “I have what they say in England is, ‘catholic taste,’ ” she says.”Which means my choices are extremely varied, and I don’t feel bad about that.”

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A Fine Mess

In the study, a Regency wash stand-turned-desk and an MR chair by Mies van der Rohe sit under a painting by Rudolf Polanszky.Henry BourneIn the study, a Regency wash stand-turned-desk and an MR chair by Mies van der Rohe sit under a painting by Rudolf Polanszky. See the interactive slideshow

Julia Muggenburg doesn’t keep anything in drawers. In the downstairs library of the house on Thurloe Square in London that she shares with her husband and two children, a guest may find it hard to concentrate, surrounded as he is by a pleasant assault of objects and furnishings: deer antler sculptures by the Austrian artist Christian Eisenberger in the fireplace; walls of meticulously stacked art and design books; and hundreds of colorful glass objects, opalescent shells and fine pottery displayed on antique tables. This room is where Muggenburg, the jewelry designer behind Belmacz, receives guests, on sky blue leather Le Corbusier chairs, for tea served in tiny Japanese clay cups on an inlaid ivory and wood chess table from Syria. The parquet floors are hidden beneath lashings of bright Persian carpets, and ceiling space is shared between a translucent Flos fan and a clear Murano glass chandelier by Barovier Toso. “It’s always been terribly important to be constantly surrounded by things that inspire me,” she says.

Muggenburg moved to London from Germany in 1991 to study sculpture and painting at Central Saint Martins College of Arts and Design. After college she met her husband, a businessman, and opened Belmacz as a gallery and showcase for her playful and ruminative collection of bracelets, earrings, pins and necklaces that fuse contemporary materials like oxidized silver with antique Roman and Indian coins — exactly the sort of unconventional juxtapositions you see here on Thurloe Square.

They bought the house in 2000 and right away Muggenburg set to work putting her mark on it. She loved the tall, narrow proportions of the Georgian architecture, but many of the additions and design details of previous owners had to go. “The house we bought was a faceless, cream-colored environment,” she says. “We ripped out all the superfluous details. We pulled up the fluffy Labrador carpet that covered the floors and discovered beautiful Portland stone.” From there, Muggenburg unleashed her art collection, layering the rooms with a lifetime of antiques and objects in a way that suggests chaos but, in fact, is her method of building tension and harmony.

“The rooms in my house are like 3-D sculptures,” Muggenburg says. “I am always moving around my furniture, pairing objects, or adding, subtracting or relocating things.” The kaleidoscope begins in the foyer, where an overwhelming collection of natural objects, from pangolin shells to whale vertebrae, share every inch of wall space with Georg Baselitz drawings and painted “bones” made of masking tape by her two sons. In the dining room, giant crystals stand in for logs in the fireplace, and a long glass table with Venetian Spatulato verdigris legs plays off the cool gray of the walls. And in the study, which is where her husband spends most of his time, a leather and ivory-inlaid mahogany Regency desk the size of a truck dominates the space. “The room sort of grew around this desk, and everything seems to work,” says Muggenburg, who beneath the desk placed a duct-tape mummy — another Eisenberger work — made by wrapping himself in tape and cutting his way out to leave a brown body-shaped cocoon.

Muggenburg says her taste was informed by her eclectic childhood. She was born in Mettmann, Germany, a town outside of Düsseldorf, and spent a lot of time in the countryside of Wuppertal, on a large piece of land that has been in her family since the 14th century. Her mother owned a small department store, and her father was a philosopher and gentleman of leisure who broke in horses and collected guns. Her mother had a great interest in all things Italian, and twice a year brought her on business trips to Venice, where they met and collaborated with the designer Roberta di Camerino and loaded up on Venetian fabrics and Murano glass. She learned how to sew from the seamstresses at her mother’s department store, and recalls being kept busy with needlework and pottery projects.

Their home had its share of sturdy German wood furniture; but here and there were modern pieces like Marcel Breuer chairs, Archille Castiglioni Taraxacum lights and KPM porcelain. While her youth was tempered by the beauty and malaise of the countryside, it was also fabulously cultured and vibrant. “I’ll never forget when my mother gave me the collected works of Goldoni,” says Muggenburg, referring to the 18th-century Italian playwright. “That, and of course all the jewelers she brought me to all over Italy.”

The sense of her house as a movable feast no doubt comes from Muggenburg’s travels. They show up everywhere: the Gaetano Pesce chairs in the garden came home with her from Turin. The conservatory has glass walls and ceilings covered in gauzy cotton fabric from India that lets in enough sunlight to bleach the books, the giant tortoise shells and the African tribal shields made of elephant and rhino hide. Even in the galley kitchen — a chockablock space that announces its constant use with shiny pots and skillets hanging in great clusters above a large island — every silver colander or shallow pot of honeycomb has some meaning for Muggenburg. “I have what they say in England is, ‘catholic taste,’ ” she says.”Which means my choices are extremely varied, and I don’t feel bad about that.”

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Man arrested after police find $4000 in stolen silverware

Follow the controversial disqualification of the Goose Creek High School Football team from state playoffs to the ruling that put them back on the field.

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Kitchen style ideas

Whether you’re building, renovating or simply looking to update, Amanda Lewis asks the experts for their top tips for a fashionable and functional space.

1. Splash out

Glass continues to be the first choice in splashbacks, according to Western Cabinets designer Kia Douglas, and there are ever- increasing design options if you want something different to the norm. “Glass companies are continually offering new exciting options, including printed options which you can create from a fun holiday snap, iconic skyline or a beautiful pattern, ” she said. “Clear glass can also be used to protect textural paintwork or a timber feature.”

2. Cook in colour

Colour isn’t just for small appliances. You can inject some fun into your kitchen with a coloured cooker, fridge or dishwasher. Smeg’s new FAB range of retro-inspired dishwashers and fridges come in red, black and panna. The fridges also come in blue, yellow, orange, pink, lime and even candy stripes. “More often our kitchens are open-plan and form part of an extended living area and because of these factors, consumers are wanting to add a pop of colour and individuality to their kitchens, ” Jim Kalotheos, of Smeg, said.

3. Window dressing

Ms Douglas said a desire to bring the outdoors in meant window splashbacks were increasing in popularity. “They add appeal and continue the relationship between our interior and outdoor space, generally adding a view of our garden and a splash of natural colour, ” she said.

4. Get moving

A portable section of an island bench or a trolley that can be stored in a designated space under the bench can increase bench and storage space as well as aid in carrying things outdoors, Jo Lively, of Brush Interiors, said.

5. Colour with confidence

Bold colours make a refreshing change to the ubiquitous white kitchen, according to Ms Douglas, who said to think outside the square when it came to adding pops of colour — think coloured bar stools, installing a bright splashback or choosing your favourite hue for a bank of overhead cabinets.

IKEA interior designer Chantelle Penny said accessories in a variety of colours could revitalise a kitchen at the fraction of the cost of replacing it.

6. Be bold with your bench

There are more options than ever when it comes to benchtop materials. Make a statement with hardy yet sleek stainless steel, large slabs of marble or even rough stone benchtops, and contrast with ultra-sleek or stone-veneer cabinets, said Scavolini’s Wanda Bresa. “The juxtaposition of finishes can make a huge impact, ” she said. Kitchen Choice designer Zoe Maynard said polished concrete benchtops were also a growing trend.

7. Shelf life

Open shelving or wine racks at the end of an island are a functional feature, Ms Penny said. “Bookshelves are also increasingly popular thanks to the huge interest in cookbooks, ” she said.

8. Don’t forget to decorate

Excuse Me Miss Indie Interior Styling’s Wendy Martin said to consider the kitchen as an extension of your decor by incorporating art, furniture and lighting normally reserved for living areas. “In general, people are proving far more adventurous and are wanting to add items such as upholstered bench seating with complementary cushions in a gorgeous fabric, ” she said. “Other ideas include bold wallpaper, coloured stools or chairs as this is a safe way to bring in colour without committing too heavily.”

9. LED the way

LED strip lighting fitted under or inside cabinets, along breakfast bars or kickboards, or incorporated into splashbacks gives a striking effect. “Another exciting option is colour-changing LED lighting, ” Ms Douglas said. “This can be placed underneath your cabinetry to create a colourful glow or used in splashback areas to provide an option for a different coloured splashback every night.”

10. Cover up

Want a magazine-worthy, seamless kitchen look? “Integrate appliances to streamline the overall appearance of the kitchen and add the illusion of space, ” Ms Lively said.

11. In the hood

Whether it pops out of the kitchen wall, sits suspended over an island bench or is concealed in cabinetry, there are myriad choices when it comes to range hoods. Ms Douglas said though integrated range hoods remained popular for a sleek look, feature range hoods in different shapes or materials were a great way to add interest.

12. Mirror, mirror

Ms Maynard said demand for mirrored splashbacks was growing, especially for people trying to make their kitchen appear larger. “This design tricks an individual’s eye perception into seeing a more spacious and animated space, ” she said.

13. Fine dining

Add a slightly higher or lower benchtop to the end of the island bench as an alternative to a dining table, according to Ms Douglas. “They offer a separate area to the main preparation zone and form the ideal space for breakfast, dinner or just a drink with friends, ” she said.

14. Go below

Ms Lively said installing an under-counter, drawer-style fridge was a great way to gain more bench space as it eliminated the need for a big fridge recess. “The added surface space is not only aesthetically pleasing but also highly functional, ” she said.

15. Step up

Instead of a standard rectangle island bench, consider one with multiple height surface areas, Ms Douglas said. “Layering of cabinetry and benchtops adds a point of interest and can contribute to a more dynamic working space and added visual interest.” Ms Maynard said multiple-height working surfaces were also ergonomically beneficial.

16. Illuminate your space

Retreat Design’s Shaye Starr said pendant lighting hung over island benches was a great way to inject personality into a kitchen. “Feature lighting around an island, especially with a plinth of mirrors, gives a gorgeous floating effect, ” she said.

17. Best kitchen colour

Choose a shade of grey when painting kitchen walls, Ms Lively recommended. “Light, warm grey shades are the perfect neutral for the kitchen, ” she said. “Easier to maintain than white, grey combines beautifully with bold accent colours like red.”

18. On the outer

Make a feature of the outer side of the island bench with a concrete tilt-up panel, mosaic tiles or a mural, Ms Lively said. Another idea is to choose a favourite photo and have it blown up on vinyl and mounted onto a piece of MDF cut to the island’s shape and size, suggested Ms Penny.

19. Two-faced

“Correctly done, two-tone cabinetry can enhance a space in various ways, including adding textural layers and visual depth, ” Ms Lively said. Ms Penny said natural wood-grain textures were popular teamed with modern white or black finishes, while Ms Maynard suggested pairing wood with stainless steel.

20. Keep it simple
Choose only a handful of colours and textures for maximum impact, Ms Starr said. “The more textures and colours, the more confusing the space appears and reduces the impact, ” she said. “Use colour for visual impact but ensure that it is where you want people to look in the first place.”

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Around the Table : November 30, 2012 – Vallejo Times

East Bay

Vallejo Farmer’s Market

Georgia Street, downtown Vallejo. The season’s freshest fruits, vegetables, greens and nuts along with freshly caught seafood and fresh-cut flowers. Georgia and Marin Streets, Vallejo Info: (707) 557-6762. Every Saturday, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.

Meyer’s 16th Annual Pots and Pans Factory Outlet Sale – Save on cookware, bake ware, dinnerware, tools and gadgets. Two Warehouse Locations: One Meyer Plaza, Vallejo and 2001 Meyer Way in Fairfield. Nov. 29 – Dec. 10 Monday through Sunday 10am – 6pm. Mention ‘Humane Society’ to receive 30% OFF. Any Humane Society donations will be matched at the Meyer Outlet Sale. Use coupon code: CHEER2012 onPotsandPans.com for 30% discount.

Renovatin’ Rocks the Holidays – Rebuilding Together Solano County will hold annual fundraising dinner event in conjunction with the Vallejo Veterans. Rebuilding Together helps provide safe homes for low-income seniors, veterans and disabled homeowner. Info: Rebuilding Together Solano County

(707) 580-9360. Tickets $30 donation per person. Vallejo Veterans Memorial Building, 420 Admiral Callaghan Lane, Vallejo. Fri. Nov. 30, 5:30 to 9 p.m.

North Bay

Sonoma Farmer’s Market – Sonoma Valley Historical Society,

270 1st St. W, Sonoma, Fri. Nov. 23 begins 9 a.m.

Murder Mystery on the Wine Train – Are you one of the world’s greatest detectives? Join

others to solve a murder, or murders.

$155 per person. Napa Valley Wine Train, 1275 McKinstry St., Napa. RSVP: reservations@winetrain.com or www.WineTrain.com. Dec. 7 (Fri.) 5:50 to 7:30 p.m.

Sonoma Valley

Association 29th Annual Holiday Open House – Toast the Holiday Season in the Wine Country. Nineteen wineries throughout the heart of Sonoma Valley take part in this annual celebration that includes wine tastings, meeting winemakers, and mingling in wine caves and cellars. Stock up on your favorite wines for the holidays, and pick up holiday gifts. $45 per person for both days, which includes a souvenir wine glass and access to all participating wineries. Designated Driver tickets are $10 each. (Sorry, no one-day tickets available.) Info: (707) 431-1137 orwww.heartofsonomavalley.com Nov. 23 – 24 from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Kenwood.

Day Trip

The Pie’s the Limit – Port and Pie Tasting – Taste ports and after-dinner wines paired with pies. 613 2nd Street, Petaluma. Info:

(707) 769-5203 orinfo@portworks.com. Tastings are complimentary. Nov. 23 – 25 from noon to 5 p.m.

Breakfast With Santa – St. Francis Solano School, 342 W. Napa St., Sonoma $8 Info: (707) 996-4994 www.saintfrancissolano.org. Sun. Nov. 25 at 8 a.m.

Cooking with Vegan Artisan Cheeses – Sonoma Cutlery hosts Chef Miyoko Schinner, author of “Vegan Artisan Cheeses” at 130 Kentucky St. in Petaluma. $15 Info: (707) 766-6433. Wed. Nov. 28 6:30 p.m.

Yappy Hour at Annex Wine Bar and Tasting Room – Bring your dog for canine fun, and enjoy $5 Loyal Companion Chardonnay which supports Pets Lifeline. 15% off dog related retail products. 865 W. Napa St., Sonoma, Wednesdays from

4 to 6 p.m.

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What’s hot in the kitchen

From appliances to fittings, Brooke Evans-Butler takes a look at what’s hot in kitchen design.

Island Benches

John Care, from Dale Alcock Display Homes, said large island benches (3m x 0.9m) were proving popular due to their practicality and functionality. “They are great for prep areas, a place for kids to sit down and do their homework or sit with a laptop and surf the net, and of course, ideal to put food on when entertaining friends, ” he said.

Lighting

Retreat Design’s Steve Johnson said sensor lighting was being used more in the kitchen. “Sensor lighting allows different areas of the kitchen to be lit as they are in use, the idea being that when doors are opened a light comes on, whether in a drawer or a cupboard, ” he said.

Cabinetry

“The latest trend in kitchen cabinet configuration is a definite preference for drawers in favour of doors, ” said kitchen designer Derek Thorogood, of Veejay’s.

Colours

Ikea interior designer Chantelle Penny said turquoise was the colour of the moment for kitchens.

Benchtops

“We are designing more kitchens with full stone benchtops that merge up into backsplashes, ” Select Solutions’ Tim Roberts said. “This allows for a seamless and grout-less finish that provides a stunning look and is easy to maintain and clean.”

Sinks

Mr Roberts said more clients were opting for smaller sinks. “(They) are looking at the new ranges that include accessories that can be inserted into the sink to cleverly convert a full-size bowl into a drainer or chopping board, ” he said.

Clever Extras

Lift mechanisms allow you to use appliances and then when you’re finished, move them out of sight with a simple of touch of a button. “With space being at a premium in the kitchen these days, these provide a great solution to moving items like the microwave and portable appliances off the kitchen benchtop and out of sight, ” said Sean Vadala, from Hafele Australia.

Appliances

Mr Vadala said the latest trends in ovens were touch controls and LCD displays. “Many ovens now feature pre-programmed intelligence, where there is a simple setting for many different meals that will control the temperature and timing for you, ” he said.

Design

Glenda Roff, kitchen designer at KTC Design, said consumers were becoming more conscious of sustainability in kitchen renovations, from reusing appliances that were still in good working order to allowing space for separating rubbish for recycling.

Sculleries

“An increasingly popular addition to kitchens, the scullery forms a ‘behind closed doors’ space for your appliances and storage needs, keeping them easily accessible, but tucked away out of sight, ” said Lincoln Trager, managing director of The Maker Designer Kitchens.

Tapware
Mr Johnson said there was a huge trend for statement tapware that provided a kitchen centrepiece. “KVC’s Eve kitchen mixer is a beautiful example of what is available with today’s kitchen taps, ” he said. “It has a curved elegant outline and features LED lighting that illuminates the water when running.”

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Cool Whip Frosting Breaks New Ground

Cool-whip-BWhile there are numerous varieties of Cool Whip Whipped Topping (including sugar-free), the nearly 50-year-old brand — launched in 1966 — is just introducing its first
non-topping extension: Cool Whip Frosting.

Three flavors of the new frosting (chocolate, vanilla and cream cheese) began hitting store shelves in September, and the launch’s
marketing campaign kicked into full gear this month.

Cool Whip Frosting is among the latest in a string of new-category extensions from venerable brands at Kraft Foods (Velveeta
Cheesy Skillets and Planters Peanut Butter, to name two). 

In this case, product development research revealed that consumers were dissatisfied with shelf-stable frosting
products, Cool Whip Brand Manager Marjani Coffey tells Marketing Daily. “Consumers said that shelf-stable frostings were too sweet, too thick and too hard to apply without damaging the
cakes or other baked goods in the process,” says Coffey. 

Cool Whip’s answer: a frozen (thaws in an hour, while your cake is baking) frosting that’s easier to
spread and use for decorating and piping, and has “just the right level of sweetness,” she says. In other words, a convenient frosting that’s more like homemade. (Suggested retail:
$2.99.)  

The new products are located in the frozen foods aisle, next to the brand’s whipped toppings, so part of the marketing mission is alerting consumers used to
finding frosting in the baking aisle that a new option can be found in the frozen aisle. Hence, in-store promotions include shelf-talkers in both the baking and frozen aisles, reports Coffey.

The launch campaign, from The Martin Agency, is themed “Reasons to Celebrate.” 

Print ads in magazines, including People, Food Network
Magazine
and Every Day With Rachael Ray, are a key element. Each version carries the headline: “So good, you’ll look for reasons to celebrate,” along with a photo of a
cake or cupcakes bearing frosting messages such as: “Baby almost slept all night!,” “Found your other sock!,” “Didn’t hit reply all” and “Took it back
without a receipt.” 

Digital ads are being run on KraftRecipes.com, and may be expanded to third-party sites, according to Coffey. A digital coupon, and FSIs in early
November and early December, are also in the mix.

In the social arena, the emphasis is on Cool Whip’s active Facebook page.
The page currently has some 334,000 “likes” — up 11% since the brand starting promoting the new frostings there, Coffey reports. 

Pinterest is also being employed,
along with outreach to some 30 mom and food bloggers. (The brand’s Twitter presence is still small, at present.)

As with other brand extension campaigns, this one is expected
to have some halo benefits for the brand’s existing, familiar products.

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