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Rachofsky daughter Meghan Looney fills her sweet 1950s home with …

Posted by on Monday, September 30, 2013  

Meghan Looney — marketing manager for Forty Five Ten and Cindy Rachofsky’s daughter — concocts a suburban house that would have June Cleaver clutching her pearls

by KRISTIE RAMIREZ

photographs by CARTER ROSE

Walk up to the West Highland Park home of Meghan Looney and the sweet 1955 cottage, with its red brick — its walls a confetti of multiple hues — gray shingles and second-story dormer windows, brings to mind a childhood dollhouse. Purple wildflowers even surround the entryway. (Surely an aproned mother will step out momentarily and ring the dinner bell?) But there is something contradictory about the satin-nickel, Art Deco house numbers by the door. A tip-off — a sign that, maybe, if you look a little closer, things aren’t exactly as they appear to be.


looney

The den was designed around the highly geometric patterned Nube armchair, foreground, by Stua, designed by Jesús and Jon Gasca and covered in fabric by artist Sarah Morris. “I grew up in a monochromatic house, so I really wanted to go for it with lots of color when I got my own place.”

The den was designed around the highly geometric patterned Nube armchair, foreground, by Stua, designed by Jesús and Jon Gasca and covered in fabric by artist Sarah Morris. “I grew up in a monochromatic house, so I really wanted to go for it with lots of color when I got my own place.”

Florence Knoll oval table surrounded by white Louis-style chairs — their yellow-and-gray ikat upholstery a fantastic, fresh choice — plays off a canary-yellow sideboard from Ikea and the room’s rich chocolate-brown walls

Florence Knoll oval table surrounded by white Louis-style chairs — their yellow-and-gray ikat upholstery a fantastic, fresh choice — plays off a canary-yellow sideboard from Ikea and the room’s rich chocolate-brown walls

A Colby Bird photograph purchased at Two x Two hangs above an exuberant sideboard from Ikea

A Colby Bird photograph purchased at Two x Two hangs above an exuberant sideboard from Ikea

: A headboard from One Kings Lane, a Rifat Özbek pillow from Number One in Highland Park Village and embroidered bedding by Mi Golondrina. The Bungalow 5 side table outlined in nail-head trim holds an Avant Garden arrangement of ranunculus, Looney’s favorite flower

: A headboard from One Kings Lane, a Rifat Özbek pillow from Number One in Highland Park Village and embroidered bedding by Mi Golondrina. The Bungalow 5 side table outlined in nail-head trim holds an Avant Garden arrangement of ranunculus, Looney’s favorite flower

A ceramic horse head from Z Gallerie, a gift from Looney’s mother, Cindy Rachofsky, is the centerpiece of a wall of black-and-white photographs that includes Robert Mapplethorpe’s Self Portrait, 1988.

A ceramic horse head from Z Gallerie, a gift from Looney’s mother, Cindy Rachofsky, is the centerpiece of a wall of black-and-white photographs that includes Robert Mapplethorpe’s Self Portrait, 1988.

Tucked among her books is Looney’s favorite piece of art on loan from her parents: a series of Jim Hodges Polaroids of his fingers spelling out the word “love.”

Tucked among her books is Looney’s favorite piece of art on loan from her parents: a series of Jim Hodges Polaroids of his fingers spelling out the word “love.”

Looney used a fun patterned paper to customize the shelves in her ample closet. (“I’m an accessories girl. Shoes and handbags.”)

Looney used a fun patterned paper to customize the shelves in her ample closet. (“I’m an accessories girl. Shoes and handbags.”)

The living room’s Warren Platner table came from the Rachofsky House; the pair of woven-back chairs was a purchase from family friend Naomi Aberly. Looney says the shag rug was her “first real rug purchase” and gave her “sticker shock.”

The living room’s Warren Platner table came from the Rachofsky House; the pair of woven-back chairs was a purchase from family friend Naomi Aberly. Looney says the shag rug was her “first real rug purchase” and gave her “sticker shock.”

That is just how Looney, the 29-year-old daughter of art patron Cindy Rachofsky, likes it. “Honestly, I didn’t love the outside,” says the former home-department buyer turned marketing manager for the boutique Forty Five Ten, “but now I think it’s one of the cool things about the house.” Step through the doorway and you immediately know that Betty Crocker is not baking here. The contemporary finish-out — a MoMA-worthy limestone fireplace in the living room, a modernist open staircase, a supersleek new kitchen — is what sold Looney when she bought the 2,500-square-foot, three-bedroom house in March 2012. She moved right in without a tweak to the interior, save for a new handrail on those stairs. With the help of interior designer and family friend Rob Dailey, Looney has created a sophisticated but playful interior that feels just right for her.

The living areas display art that her mother and her stepfather, collector Howard Rachofsky, have given her over the years. A wall of  stark black-and-white photographs, including a Robert Mapplethorpe borrowed from the family’s collection, is in striking contrast to the rest of the Technicolor den, which includes a pair of Harry Bertoia Bird Chairs that Looney’s mother bought her as a child, a teal velvet sofa with hot-pink throw pillows and a wildly patterned armchair by Stua, covered in fabric by artist Sarah Morris, that Looney won at a Two x Two for AIDS and Art auction, the annual benefit hosted by her mother and stepfather at their Richard Meier house on Preston Road.

Looney’s favorite place is her dining room. A Florence Knoll oval table surrounded by white Louis-style chairs — their yellow-and-gray ikat upholstery a fantastic, fresh choice — plays off a canary-yellow sideboard from Ikea and the room’s rich chocolate-brown walls. Looney’s frequent dinner parties are something that new roommate and former Episcopal School of Dallas classmate Nile Nussbaumer is looking forward to. (If the ever-traveling Nussbaumer ever gets back home, that is. “Yeah,” Looney says, “Nile is here for a little while and then gone most of the winter.” Nussbaumer’s room is unfinished at the moment — “She just ordered a box spring” — but already has the quintessential global-chic hallmarks of her famous decorator-nomad mother, Michelle Nussbaumer. Hammered-silver side tables and an ikat-covered West Elm desk sit waiting to be used.)

While the living and dining rooms are color riots, Looney’s bedroom is calming white, with just pops of red: pillows by the Turkish fashion designer Rifat Özbek and two 1950s Thomasville cabinets that hold a borderline-obsessive collection of coffee-table books. But it is the bathroom that really makes the former Kim Dawson Agency model swoon. A creamy cowhide warms up the Texas limestone floor; a trio of Roberto Dutesco photos of wild horses on Sable Island, Nova Scotia, speaks to Looney, an avid equestrienne. “I really wanted those, and I wondered what my parents would think of them,” says Looney, who sought their advice while contemplating the purchase. “I guess they liked them, because they gave them to me for my birthday.” She adds with a smile: “I know. I’m a lucky girl.”

 

 

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Julia Child Foundation whips up lawsuit against Williams-Sonoma

Williams-Sonoma illegally used the name and likeness of the late Julia Child more than 100 times in advertising, marketing, and promotional materials for numerous commercial products, such as pots, pans, cookware, and kitchenware, according to a new suit filed by the Julia Child Foundation in California state court.

Throughout Child’s 40-year career, she “famously refused to allow her name or image to be used to market or sell commercial products, particularly culinary products such as pots, pans, stoves, food brands, etc.,” the Foundation wrote in the suit. Child’s television program, The French Chef, debuted in 1963 and was broadcast nationally for ten years, winning Emmy and Peabody Awards. She authored a total of 18 books, “nearly all of them educational books about food, cooking and the culinary arts,” including Mastering the Art of French Cooking, which launched her career.

To uphold her legacy, the Foundation – which holds the posthumous publicity rights for Child – “has adopted the same policy and generally refuses all requests of companies and brands to allow her name or image to be used in connection with their advertising, marketing or promotion.”

The complaint alleges that Williams-Sonoma “prominently” used Child’s name and photograph in a broad variety of promotional materials in stores, e-mail blasts to customers, on the company’s Web site, and across a spectrum of social media sites that enabled Facebook and Pinterest users to further distribute such imagery. The retailer even “ran a ‘Julia Child Sweepstakes’ [to] further promot[e] its business and products.”

All of these commercial uses of Child’s image were done without permission or compensation, the Foundation said. The suit seeks an injunction against all future use of Julia Child’s name, photograph, likeness, and other indicia of her persona, as well as monetary damages for their unauthorized use. Punitive damages should also be awarded, the suit contended, as the defendant’s actions were willful and with deliberate disregard of her publicity rights.

To read the complaint in The Julia Child Foundation v. Williams-Sonoma, click here.

Why it matters: The Foundation’s complaint alleges that Williams-Sonoma’s unauthorized use of Child’s publicity rights was not just illegal but also goes against Julia Child’s personal beliefs. “Throughout her life and career, Julia Child had many opportunities for commercial advancement, including commercial endorsement and spokesperson opportunities with companies in the food and culinary industry,” according to the complaint. “She could have created a lifestyle brand like Martha Stewart or Oprah Winfrey, and could have become a spokesperson for multi-billion commercial brands in the kitchen, culinary and food industry – brands such as Williams-Sonoma – for large sums of money. Instead, she steadfastly refused all such commercial opportunities and focused her career on public education.”

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LANG Announces New Line of Household Gifts

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LANG Wall Calendars

Lang.com buyer, Rita Schacht says, ‘Since new dinnerware collections and kitchen accessories feature artwork from longtime LANG Artists and brand new artists, there is something that fits everyone’s style and personality.’

Waukesha, WI (PRWEB) September 30, 2013

The LANG Company has been proudly producing beautiful calendars, Christmas cards, coffee mugs and stationery for more than 30 years. With every item featuring gorgeous full-color artwork from world renowned artists, LANG has created a wonderful tradition of quality and beauty among all products. LANG is excited to continue to create and carry the classic favorites, as well as brand new fresh designs and products.

LANG Wall Calendars have been a favorite among consumers since the beginning. LANG now carries and produces more than 75 lovely designs and themes. Charming stationery and Christmas cards are another favorite featuring full-color artwork and inspirational sayings. LANG coffee mugs also make a wonderful addition to your LANG collections. LANG’s Director of Brand Management, Steve Anderson says, “Sipping your coffee out of a LANG coffee mug is the best way to kick off your day!” LANG Coffee, Latte and Café Mugs also make a great gift, as each one comes with a matching gift box.

More recently, LANG has added beautiful dinnerware, home décor and outdoor décor items to its ever-growing online store. Carrying out LANG’s strong tradition of starting with great art, each new item is carefully selected to complement the timeless LANG brand. Lang.com buyer, Rita Schacht says, “Since new dinnerware collections and kitchen accessories feature artwork from longtime LANG Artists and brand new artists, there is something that fits everyone’s style and personality.” New home décor items also add the touch of comfort that turn your house into a home.

The LANG Company has been the industry leader in beautiful wall calendars, Christmas Cards and coffee mugs since the company was founded in 1982. Known for its vibrant and unique artwork from world renowned artists, LANG also prides itself in quality products and one-of-a-kind art. LANG is also known for lovely stationery, dinnerware collections, home décor, outdoor décor and a wonderful assortment of gifts. Visit http://www.lang.com for additional information.

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KitchenAid Introduces Dishwasher With Industry’s Lowest Water Usage


BENTON HARBOR, Mich., Sept. 9, 2013 /PRNewswire via COMTEX/ —
The latest dishwasher from KitchenAid, the pioneers behind the first models ever made for the home, combines the best cleaning and drying performance ever offered by KitchenAid with the industry’s lowest water usage, as published on EnergyStar.gov. Featuring an innovative washing method called the AquaSense(TM) Recycling System, the brand’s newest dishwasher uses water from the last rinse cycle to pre-rinse the next cycle before using fresh water to complete the cleaning process.

“If you have great water efficiency but need to rewash because you’re not getting the desired results, that efficiency is quickly diminished,” notes Beth Robinson, senior manager of brand experience for KitchenAid. “Our engineers have come up with a way to deliver on both fronts by designing a dishwasher that not only uses 33% less water than previous models but also delivers our best performance ever.”

One of the brand’s quietest models as well, it features a filter based wash system with Whisper Quiet® 41 dBA sound insulation for the stainless steel tub. A Heat Dry Option activates a dedicated heating element offering the option of having dishes completely dry at the end of a cycle.

A range of wash cycles include a ProWash(TM) Cycle that takes the guess work out of choosing the right cycle by automatically adjusting water and energy use based on details such as load size and soil amounts. When quicker results are needed a One-Hour wash cycle cleans and dries dishes faster while a Heavy Duty Cycle can be selected for hard to clean items like pots, pans or casserole dishes. A ProScrub® Option eliminates the need to soak or pre-scrub items with baked on food by using 40 powerful spray jets to concentrate cleaning power. Additional cycle options include a Normal Wash for regular loads, a Light China cycle for loads that don’t require heavy duty cleaning and a Rinse Only Cycle.

Additional premium features found on the new model include well-spaced tines that enable greater space between dishes so wash and rinse water can clean more efficiently. To make room for larger pots, pans and dishes, fold-down tines adjust for easier accommodation. An adjustable upper rack accommodates tall plates on the lower rack when necessary. A generous silverware basket avoids crowding while cup and stemware holders provide added convenience in the upper rack. For easy-gliding operation, SatinGlide® Max Rack Glides use 52 ball bearings on each rail.

Available in stainless steel the exterior features a front display that shows the cycle stage and progression when the dishwasher is running. An “add a dish” indicator signals when a dish may be added and still come out clean. Scheduled to be available in October, the suggested retail price on the new KitchenAid® dishwasher is $1,699.

Since the introduction of its legendary stand mixer in 1919 and first dishwasher in 1949, KitchenAid has built on the legacy of these icons to create a complete line of products designed for cooks. Today, the KitchenAid brand offers virtually every essential for the well-equipped kitchen with a collection that includes everything from countertop appliances to cookware, ranges to refrigerators, and whisks to wine cellars. Cook for the Cure®, the brand’s partnership with Susan G. Komen for the Cure®, is now in its twelfth year and has raised over $9 million to help find a cure for breast cancer. To learn why chefs choose KitchenAid for their homes more than any other brand*, visit www.KitchenAid.com or join us at http://facebook.com/KitchenAid and http://twitter.com/KitchenAidUSA.

* Based on a 2012 survey, KitchenAid was found to be the home kitchen appliance brand chosen most often by members of the International Association of Culinary Professionals.

SOURCE KitchenAid

Copyright (C) 2013 PR Newswire. All rights reserved

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How Valuable Is Kraft’s Grocery Business?

The grocery segment is the most profitable business for Kraft Foods Group (NASDAQ:KRFT) and also generates the highest revenues for the company. According to our estimates, the division makes up ~40% of the company’s total value. However, the division that primarily produces crackers, salted snacks, biscuits and nuts has been under pressure over the past few quarters due to heightened competition in certain categories. Here we provide an overview of the key value drivers and challenges to growth for Kraft’s grocery business.

Kraft Foods Group manufactures and markets packaged food products including beverages, cheeses, convenient meals and various grocery products. The company primarily deals in the North American markets with the majority of its sales coming from the U.S. and Canada. It generates annual revenues topping $18 billion and has guided for adjusted earnings per share target of $2.78 for 2013.

See Our Complete Analysis For Kraft Foods Group

Key Value Drivers

1. Growing Grocery Market

We expect the grocery market in the U.S. to grow at around 3-4% CAGR in the long run on growing consumer expenditure on food items and higher employment rates along with improving consumer confidence. According to the latest statistics released by the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), average consumer expenditure on food items has increased by ~8% over the last 3 years. [1]

The consumer confidence index and non-farm employment growth have also been improving at a steady rate in the U.S. According to data compiled by Technomic, the consumer confidence index and employment growth for July 2013 at 80.3 and 1.7%, respectively, were a significant improvement over 2010 levels.

2. High Profit Margins

By our estimates, Kraft’s grocery division makes up almost 40% of the company’s value while it contributes just about 25% to its consolidated revenues. This is because Kraft earns healthy margins on the sale of its grocery line of products. The division’s adjusted EBITDA (a measure of profitability) at over 30% is over one and a half times the company’s consolidated figure of ~20%. Higher margins are a result of some very popular grocery brands operated by the company such as its namesake Mac and Cheese, Jell-O and Planters.

Moreover, Kraft has also been able to expand its margins in the grocery business by ~300 basis points since 2010, according to our estimates. Most of these profitability gains have come from productivity enhancements in supply chain and manufacturing processes based on Lean Six Sigma principles. During the first six months of the year these measures delivered net productivity of over 2.5% of cost of goods sold (COGS), which is the company’s long-term target. [2] We believe that a continued focus on productivity improvements and reducing overhead costs will help the company sustain its high profit margins from the grocery business.

3. Successful New Products

By our estimates, Kraft controls around 25% of the grocery market in the U.S., and realizes that the success of new products is the key to sustain its high market share in the long run. The company has delivered quite well on this agenda over the last couple of years. It launched Velveeta cheesy skillets in 2011, which captured 8% of the dry dinner mixes market within 3 months of its launch. [3] Revenues from the product were up more than 30% year-on-year during the first quarter and continued their double-digit growth during the second quarter as well. [4]

The fact that Velveeta cheesy skillets recorded double-digit growth throughout 2012 alongside Kraft’s widely popular mac and cheese brand suggests that the company has really been able to strike a chord with consumers in the dry dinner mixes category. Kraft also launched Recipe Makers in the convenient dinner category recently. Recipe Makers is a line of meal starters that comes with two sauces, which can be easily added to fresh ingredients to complete the meal.

Key Challenges to Growth

1. Stiff Competition

Kraft faces stiff competition from private label manufacturers that compete primarily on pricing. This competition has intensified due to weak economic conditions as consumers increasingly look for cost saving options and are attracted to the lower-priced brands. Price-based competition has impacted the performance of Kraft’s grocery division recently. Grocery sales, which declined by almost 4% y-o-y during the first six months of the year, have been a drag on the company’s overall performance. [2]

Kraft has been underperforming in the salad dressings category primarily due to stiff competition from private label brands on one hand and increasing demand for labels that offer fresh, organic salad dressings on the other hand. As a result, budget brands offered by Kraft are getting squeezed. Unilever also recently sold off its salad dressings business, Wish Bone, to Pinnacle Foods. [5]

Sales of Jell-O, a very popular brand in North America that is generally used as a synonym for gelatin desserts, have also declined over the past few quarters on not enough marketing push and tougher competition in the snacks category. While gelatin dessert mix sales have remained almost flat, refrigerated pudding, mouse and gelatin sales fell ~20% over the last one year, according to IRI. [6] The company’s CEO mentioned during the second quarter earnings call that two-third of the division’s brands are going to be on air during the third quarter in order to boost sales. [3]

2. Cost Pressures

Volatile commodity costs remain the single biggest threat to the profitability of Kraft’s grocery business. The company uses commodities including dairy products, coffee beans, meat products, wheat, corn products, soybean and vegetable oils, nuts, sugar and other sweeteners as raw materials. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the prices of milk have risen at a CAGR of 4%, beef prices have shot up at a CAGR of 6% while the prices of coffee and chicken have risen at a CAGR of 15% and 5% respectively, over the period of last three years. Not only this, the company is also expected to increase investments in innovation and promotional strategies for new products as it tries to maintain and advance its market share in the key categories. In 2012, the company’s advertisement costs were up by around 20% y-o-y. [2] This is expected to put additional downward pressure on margins going forward.

We currently have $61 price estimate for Kraft Foods Group, which is almost 10% above the current market price. Our estimate implies that the Grocery business is worth around $14 billion looking at the sum of the parts of its valuation.

Understand How a Company’s Products Impact its Stock Price at Trefis

Notes:

  1. Consumer Expenditures–2012, www.bls.gov [↩]
  2. Company SEC Filings, sec.gov [↩] [↩] [↩]
  3. Velveeta Boosts Sales with Cheesy Skillets, fooddigital.com [↩] [↩]
  4. Q2 2013 Earnings Call Presentation, ir.kraftfoodsgroup.com [↩]
  5. Salad Dressings Are Getting Squeezed, wsj.com [↩]
  6. Kraft Launches Comeback Plan for Jell-O, adage.com [↩]
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Fair Trade Winds to Exhibit at Wed Altered’s Pop-Up Bridal Event in New York City

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Fair Trade Winds offers unique wedding gifts like this hand block printed table cloth made in India.

Wed Altered’s ethical approach to weddings fits our own philosophy of offering unique, ethical wedding gifts to consumers who care about the products they buy.

(PRWEB) September 30, 2013

Fair Trade Winds will showcase a variety of fair trade wedding accessories and registry options at Wed Altered’s Pop Up Bridal Boutique on October 12th and 13th from 10:00am until 7:00pm at Studio Arte in New York City. Wed Altered is a collective of eco-friendly wedding designers who emphasize ethical production, sustainable design, Fair Trade principles, and work with charitable organizations. Visit http://www.wedaltered.com/shows/ to purchase tickets to the Pop Up Event.

“Wed Altered’s ethical approach to weddings fits with our own philosophy of offering unique, ethical wedding gifts to consumers who care about the products that they buy,” said Paul Culler, co-founder of Fair Trade Winds. Culler, along with his wife Lois, owns six brick and mortar Fair Trade Winds stores across the country. “People often buy wedding gifts for their friends or family at our stores, so we are excited to partner with Wed Altered to reach more of those socially conscious consumers.”

Fair Trade Winds offers a unique wedding registry experience for couples who are planning a wedding. They can be sure that the products they select will reflect their own ethical values. All of Fair Trade Winds’ products are handmade, fairly traded and often made from sustainable, recycled and re-purposed materials. Their products include handmade jewelry, decor and wall art, sustainable photo-albums and frames, and a variety of housewares such as kitchen and dining accessories, hand blocked table linens, recycled glassware.

Fair Trade Winds seeks to empower customers to become an integral part of a global, cooperative effort to benefit artisans, farmers, and the environment. Fair Trade ensures that craftspeople and farmers work in safe and empowering conditions, that there is no child labor, and the artisans are encouraged to invest time and money into their talents, land, families, and communities.

In 2007, Lois and Paul Culler founded Fair Trade Winds in Bar Harbor, ME. Since then they have opened stores in Fairfax, VA, Stony Brook, NY, Seattle, WA, Springfield, OH, and Jamestown, RI.

Fair Trade Winds is a member of Green America and the Fair Trade Federation. To see all of the products Fair Trade Winds offers or set up a registry, please visit http://www.fairtradewinds.net. For more information, please email info(at)fairtradewinds(dot)net.

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WE CARE: Funds sought for boy who needs to travel for medical treatment

Funds are being sought for a 13-year-old boy with disabilities who has to travel to Seattle Children’s Hospital for tests and treatment. His mother needs help with gas and hotel costs. Money or gas cards would greatly help. The family could also use money, coupons or gift cards for food.

Call Timothy Laskowski, BSW, PhD, Community Medical Center, Home and Community Based Services, 327-4586.

A woman with disabilities and her husband who is battling cancer are in desperate need of a La-Z-Boy recliner for him as he is unable to sleep lying down in a bed. She needs a basic, working vacuum cleaner. If you can donate either or both items please contact Darin at Winds of Change, 721-2038.

A single, disabled woman needs an upright freezer. If you are able to help, please call Sara with Winds of Change Mental Health Center, 546-0766.

A single, working mom who recently left a domestic violence situation is in need of basic household items to get established in her own home. Items needed include a twin mattress, two twin bed frames, a queen bed frame, dresser, washer/dryer, kitchen chairs, couch, broom/mop, vacuum, silverware/ utensils and pots/pans. If you can help, call Jenny at The Parenting Place, 728-5437.

The Joseph Residence, a program of the Poverello Center, is in need of two twin-size mattresses and one full-size mattress. All mattresses are for bunk beds so a box spring is not needed. The Joseph Residence also has a family is in need of a child carrier seat to attach to the back of her bike, or a baby bike trailer. This client’s main form of transportation is by bike.

The Joseph Residence is unable to pick up items. Only items that can be delivered are accepted.

Drop items off at 2405 McIntosh Loop or call 549-6158.

Futures, a program of WORD inc., is working with a young family that is need of help to fix their car. This family has worked incredibly hard to stabilize their lives and to provide a safe and comfortable home for their 4-year-old daughter and brand new baby son. The father has recently completed getting his heavy machine operator certification as well as his CDL license but, due to impending cold weather, he is taking odd jobs for the time being. They live outside of town and a car is a vital necessity to be able to get to work, appointments and to get groceries. If you are able to help in any way please call Thomas Smith, Young Father and Family Advocate, at 543-3550 Ext. 216.

Full Circle Counseling Solutions is seeking donations for a local family in need. A single mother on disability is in need of assistance for car repairs to allow her to transport her children to appointments. Donations may include gift cards, cash or check that can be mailed to or dropped off at Full Circle Counseling Solutions 1903 S. Russell. For questions or additional information, call (406) 229-0438.

A woman with disabilities and her teenage son who is developmentally disabled and has a mental illness are in need of $40 for the Missoula Housing Authority Low Income Housing application fee. They are currently living in a one-bedroom basement apartment without a washer or dryer and would like to move to a two-bedroom apartment. The check can be made out to M.H.A. Please contact Darin at Winds Of Change, 721-2038.

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