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Here’s what you shouldn’t buy on Labor Day

You’re ready to hit the Labor Day sales. You made your list, you’ve compared deals and you’ve got your game face on. But there’s one thing you may not know: Sometimes, the smartest way to shop is not to.

Indeed, certain items are actually best bought long after Labor Day sales have come and gone. Before you hit the stores this weekend, do your homework by browsing NerdWallet Shopping’s DealFinder to compare prices and avoid “deals” that aren’t really deals.

Here are five things that you shouldn’t buy this Labor Day:

Electronics

Labor Day sale ads often tout deals on electronics, but the best time to get a deep discount on this stuff is later in the year, during the Black Friday sales frenzy. If you’re looking for televisions, computers, laptops, video game systems, camcorders, GPS navigators or digital cameras, the end-of-year discounts are worth the wait.

Fall clothing

Since Labor Day weekend is the unofficial start of fall, stores are rolling out their trendy cool-weather apparel—and often advertising them as being on sale. But fall and winter clothing will not reach its lowest price until later in the season. The higher priority for clothing stores is to get rid of summer clothing, which is quickly losing its usefulness and, in some cases, going out of style. So, at least for this weekend, you’re better off buying next year’s swimsuit than this year’s sweater.

Patio furniture

After Labor Day, it’s out with the old and in with the new when it comes to summer’s must-haves. Prices on patio furniture, outdoor accessories and pool supplies will hit rock bottom later in September. The further away from summer we get, the more desperate stores are to unload summer goods and make room for winter gear, which equals lots of clearances and discounts. If you’re thinking of updating your outdoor-living essentials, try to push your purchases as deep into September as possible.

Toys

For children’s toys, think Christmas: Toys reach their lowest prices in anticipation of the holiday season. For great deals on existing toy models, shop in October or November, when stores are making room for the hottest new toys. If you want one of those buzzy new items, alas; this year’s Zhu Zhu Pet or Big Hugs Elmo won’t be discounted until late December, when the hype has started to fade. So hold off on toy purchases for a month or two—if the kids in your life can wait.

Cookware

With the holiday season looming, now would seem a good time to beat the rush and stock up on cookware for your holiday feasting. But if you want the best deal on kitchen appliances and baking essentials, hold off a while longer. November and December are the best months of the year for purchasing cookware. This includes everything from cutlery and bakeware to small appliances.

So go ahead and hit those Labor Day sales—there are plenty of deals to be had. Let this advice be your guide, and remember: Patience can be a shopping virtue.

NerdWallet is a USA TODAY content partner providing general news, commentary and coverage from around the Web. Its content is produced independently of USA TODAY.

(Copyright © 2014 USA TODAY)

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Nothing says Sunday morning like bacon in the frying pan

 

Alarm clocks are my nemesis. We are slaves to an alarm six days out of every week. And my husband insists on using the old school, painfully obnoxious variety that jars me awake violently each morning. The noise is reminiscent of the blaring scream that warns of a nuclear fallout. I have told him, at many 4:00 a.m. wakings, that the day he retires, I am bringing that little bugger out into the driveway and bashing it to bits with a sledgehammer. He thinks that sounds wasteful. I think is sounds cathartic.

There is only one day that I am saved from the wretched screeching that brings on homicidal emotions. Sunday mornings are sacred to me for this reason. Particularly now that my kids are older and, in theory, can feed themselves, I am afforded the opportunity to sleep to my hearts content. Even the dogs and cats leave me alone. Whether they fear my wrath or are just equally thrilled to not have to wake to a siren, is unclear. All I do know is that no one dares disturb my slumber.

Getting up on this morning is always bittersweet. I know that I am well rested (provided no animals forced me from bed by vomiting in the dark of the night), but I also know that for the next six days, I won’t have such a luxury. The driving force that pulls me from under the sheets is a carved-in-stone family tradition: bacon.

I know my family is not alone in this tradition. This is obvious because the brand of smoked pork that I purchase is named, “Sunday Bacon.” Bacon is clearly a national obsession. There are websites and facebook groups dedicated to its deliciousness. Even vegetarians admit that this glorious, salty meat is a necessity and have created several varieties of “facon,” a horrifying bastardization, but an obvious nod to the wonder of the original.

Bacon love is hardwired into the genetic code of my children. On vacations of his youth, my husband would pester his grandfather for the breakfast staple. The not-so-patient older man was so browbeaten by this that he would give Brian raw bacon. And Brian would eat it.

People who do not eat bacon for moral reasons, or, God forbid, because they don’t like it, are deemed suspicious and untrustworthy by my family. My daughter, like me, is a mush when it comes to animals and their cuteness. As she got older and learned about the origins on the meats that she found on her plate, she was saddened by the thought of a life ending in order for her to eat. Being that we count a pet pig and chickens amongst our family members, she was particularly horrified. She brought up the idea of being a vegetarian. My princess had naturally shied away from meat for most of her life, so it would not be a very difficult transition. I had been a vegetarian for many years, so I understood where she was coming from and had a frank discussion with my little girl.

“Being a vegetarian can be a good choice. However, you have to be more aware of your food choices and be sure to take in enough protein. It’s essential that you increase foods like nuts, beans and eggs to continue to grow and thrive.”

She’s a huge fan of those foods, so this was all good news. I could see her really taking to the idea. No more bad feelings when looking at her dinner plate!

“Oh, and you’d have to give up bacon.”

“What?! Why would I do that?! Who would do that?! That’s cruel and weird. I can’t live like that.”

And that was the end of her very brief foray into a vegetarian life.

Their is a problem with bacon, though. As a strong advocate of sustainable living, I learned long ago that an infinite supply of bacon is not sustainable. There is only so much bacon that can come from a single pig. Therefore, we regard our bacon with the appropriate revelry. Each Sunday morning, we cook only one half pound of bacon for our family of four.

This respect for bacon has garnered some odd side-traditions at our house. The most prevalent being the burning question, “How many pieces do we get today?”

Is it a two-piece day? Or maybe, blessedly, a three-piece day? The eight ounce package weight remains constant, but how that is sliced up is a constant variable. Which leads to another tradition that nearly every mom will understand. The total number of slices is divided by three, and if there is any remainder, that is my share. Sometimes it’s one slice, sometimes two, but on most Sunday mornings, it comes out to none.

I am not a martyr. This is not some abusive policy forced upon me by an uncaring and cruel family. This is my choice. As a mother, the sheer joy that something so little as bacon brings to my children, is way more important then any salted pork product. Of course, I should maybe be a little concerned about the intense love they have for bacon, but that’s an issue way bigger then me.

Cooking bacon is no little thing. I am rarely allowed to come near the skillet, as Brian has a time-honored, torturously slow method for pan frying it (and some other peculiar breakfast-cooking quirks that I’ll reserve for another time). Some have told us how they broil theirs. Others extol the virtues of the quick-fix option of microwaving. Heresy. An abomination. A true horror.

No Nigro Sunday morning bacon delicacy will ever see the inside of anything other then a good ole fashion frying pan. Oh, and no non-stick either. Not only does the bacon render all the glorious fat you need to prevent sticking, teflon and its counterparts are among the most toxic materials to the earth and the people that live on it. A good stainless steel or cast iron skillet will last a lifetime, or even longer. Mine is a hand-me-down from mom, that came from her mom.

Cast iron is fabulous and I try to cook just about everything in it. From my multiple frying pans to my Dutch oven, I love the way things cook and the feel of the heavy, sturdy cookware. Seasoning cast iron is essential to keeping it nearly non-stick. For the best how-to, I defer to the experts. Lodge has been making cast iron since 1896. Follow their instructions for the perfectly seasoned cast iron.

Do you have any odd traditions that are sacred to your family, but might make others question their relationship with you? I’m good at keeping secrets and after all, who isn’t just a little bit crazy? Share with me at .

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Comfort Food Made Easy: 30 Minute Meals to Simplify your Life – The Herald

Comfort Food Made Easy: 30 Minute Meals to Simplify your Life

Comfort Food Made Easy: 30 Minute Meals to Simplify your Life

Chad A Elick



Posted: Sunday, August 31, 2014 3:00 pm
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Updated: 5:02 pm, Sun Aug 31, 2014.

Comfort Food Made Easy: 30 Minute Meals to Simplify your Life

Donna Elick

heraldtimesonline.com

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0 comments

Fall weather is upon us and I am craving comfort food.  We are so busy with activities, shopping and school that we can barely spare 30 minutes to create our favorite dishes.  Well, you asked and we answered.  Here is The Ultimate Comfort Food Guide of 30 Minute Meals.  Meals ranging from skillets to casseroles to soups that are all ready in a snap.

With love from our Simple Kitchen to yours!

View original at Parade.com

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    Sunday, August 31, 2014 3:00 pm.

    Updated: 5:02 pm.


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    Category: Skillets  Tags: ,  Comments off

    Weekend Entertainment Guide 8/31/2014 – Scranton Times

    CLUBS

    ARLO’S TAVERN, 10340 Route 171, Union Dale: today, Clarence Spady Band.

    BAR LOUIE, Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs, Plains Twp.: today, Just Press Play.

    BAR ON OAK, 900 Oak St., Pittston: Tuesday, line dancing with Danny Star; Wednesday, line dancing with Barb.

    BAZIL, 1101 Northern Blvd., Clarks Summit: Wednesdays, Marko Marcinko Jazz Quartet.

    BLU WASABI, Route 6, Dickson City: Tuesdays, Solo-Lu.

    BOTTLENECKS, 3 S. Main St., Wilkes-Barre: Wednesdays, the Jam with Abstract Peoples, DJ Hersh.

    BREAKERS, Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs, Plains Twp.: today, M80.

    CHESTNUT STREET TAVERN, Dunmore: Tuesday, DJ Deborah; Wednesday, DJ Terry Oke.

    COOPER’S CABANA, 304 Kennedy Blvd., Pittston: today, Karaoke with DJ Honey Doo; Tuesday, Bike Night with DJ Ringmaster.

    COOPER’S SEAFOOD HOUSE, 701 N. Washington Ave.: today, Omnitial.

    FORMOSA, 727 S. State St., Clarks Summit: Thursdays, Ron Leas Kenny McGraw.

    FOUR SEASONS ASIAN BISTRO, 1146 S. Main Ave.: Wednesdays, open mic.

    GLASS — WINE.BAR.KITCHEN., 119 Falls Ave., Hawley: today, Blues, Brews BBQ with the Dan Brother Band.

    MAIN STREET MUSIC, 1833 N. Main Ave.: Sundays, jam session with Jack Mead and Chris Gratz.

    NOSH, 280 Main St., Dickson City: Wednesdays, Frankie and Toby.

    O’LEARY’S PUB, 514 Ash St.: Wednesdays, the Village Idiots; Thursdays, open jam with Jerry Trapper.

    OAK STREET EXPRESS, 729 Oak St.: today, Jackson Vee; Tuesday, Jeff Lewis; Wednesday, Karaoke with Speaker Jam.

    PARKER HOUSE TAVERN, 12 E. Parker St.: today, Crazy Karaoke with DJ Bossmare.

    POOR RICHARD’S PUB, 125 Beech St.: Saturdays, Karaoke with Honey Entertainment.

    RUTH’S CHRIS STEAK HOUSE, Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs, Plains Twp.: Thursdays, Music for Models Trio; Fridays and Saturdays, Jimmy Waltich Jazz Trio; Tuesdays and Wednesdays, Phil Hinton Top 40.

    SAMBUCA GRILL, 234 Penn Ave.: Fridays and Saturdays, Paul Ardito.

    SKYTOP LODGE, Skytop: Saturdays, Doug Smith Orchestra.

    MUSIC

    CORNSTOCK FOLK FESTIVAL: today, Lazy Brook Park, 55 Overloook Road, Tunkhannock, $45 advance/$55 at gate/free for children 16 and younger. Visit cornstockfestival.com. 570-250-7464.

    INAUGURAL CAMPFIRE OUTDOOR ADVENTURE MUSIC FESTIVAL: today, Lakewood, fees vary, email info@campfirefestival.com.

    NAY AUG PARK SUNDAY CONCERTS: Doug Smith’s Dixieland All-Stars, today; Tom Hamilton Friends (jazz), Sept. 7; Jim Buckley Jazztet, Sept. 14; all concerts begin at 2 p.m., Nay Aug Park Bandstand, free. 570-348-4186 or 570-969-1300.

    MONUMENTOUR: with Fall Out Boy and Paramore, today, 7 p.m., Pavilion at Montage Mountain, $26/$41/$61/ $71. Visit www.livenation.com.

    COUNTRY MEGATICKET: Miranda Lambert, Justin Moore and Thomas Rhett, today, $36/ $70.75; Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, Bethel, N.Y. $130.75/$312.25/$412.25 series. Visit www.bethelwoods center.org.

    JIMMY WELCH JAZZ BAND: Sept. 7, 3 p.m., Dietrich Theater, Tunkhannock, free, donations accepted. 570-996-1500.

    ELVIS TRIBUTE ARTIST SHAWN KLUSH: Sept. 7, cocktails 3 to 4 p.m., show 4 to 6 p.m., Woodloch Pines, Hawley, $35. 570-253-5779, 570-226-9750 or 570-253-0637.

    SHANDELEE MUSIC SERIES: Lana Trotovsek and Anna Shelest, Sept. 7, Event Gallery, Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, Bethel, N.Y. Visit www.BethelWoodsCenter.org. 845-583-2060.

    WILLIE NELSON FAMILY: Sept. 11, 7:30 p.m., F.M. Kirby Center for the Performing Arts, Wilkes-Barre, $47/$57/$67/ $97 Visit www.kirbycenter.org. 570-826-1100.

    TOM CHAPIN: Sept. 13, Event Gallery, Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, Bethel, N.Y. Visit www.BethelWoodsCenter.org. 845-583-2060.

    SIMPLE GIFTS: World Celebration Festival music workshop, Sept. 15, Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, Bethel, N.Y., email Education@BethelWoods Center.org. 845-583-2097.

    MUSIC IN THE FOREST SERIES: The Young Geezers, Sept. 14, 3 p.m.; Carriage House, Lacawac Sanctuary, 94 Sanctuary Road, Lake Ariel, $10 members/$15 nonmembers/free for children under 12, email info@lacawac.org. Visit lacawac.org. 570-689-9494.

    NORTHEASTERN PENNSYL-VANIA PHILHARMONIC: Philharmonic Sneak Preview, Sept. 17, 5 to 7 p.m., Afa Gallery, 514 Lackawanna Ave., free; An Evening with Erica Kiesewetter Jon Nakamatsu, Sept. 17, refreshments 6:30 p.m., show 7 p.m., Sordoni Theatre, WVIA Studios, Pittston; all-Tchaikovsky concert, Sept. 19, 8 p.m., F.M. Kirby Center for the Performing Arts, Wilkes-Barre; An Evening with Jenny Oaks Baker, Oct. 17, 8 p.m., Theater at Lackawanna College, 501 Vine St.; Oct. 18, 8 p.m., F.M. Kirby Center, 8 p.m.; Schubert’s Shepherd on the Rock, Nov. 5, refreshments 6:30 p.m., show 7 p.m., Sordoni Theatre, WVIA Studios; fees vary, email info@nepaphil.org. 570-270-4444.

    TOMMY O SEPTEMBER SONG: Sept. 19, 6 p.m., Via Appia, 900 S. Main St., Taylor, $50 includes dinner, benefits St. Joseph’s Center Auxiliary. 570-963-1290.

    BRATISLAVA BOYS CHOIR FROM SLOVAKIA: Sept. 19, 7:30 p.m., St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church, 35 S. Franklin St., Wilkes-Barre; Sept. 20, 7:30 p.m., St. Peter’s Cathedral, 315 Wyoming Ave, $15 suggested donation. 570-287-6554.

    SOPRANO BECKY TURNER AND PIANIST RICK HOFFENBERG: Sept. 20,7:30 p.m., Marian Chapel, Swartz Center, Marywood University, free.

    NEW YORK TRUMPET ENSEMBLE WITH MARK GOULD: Sept. 20, 7:30 p.m., Houlihan-McLean Center, University of Scranton, free. 570-941-7624.

    SUNDAY MUSIC SERIES: Jazz, Sept. 21; Gospel, Jan. 11; Gershwin, Feb. 22; Classical, April 12; Scranton Cultural Center at The Masonic Temple, 420 N. Washington Ave. Visit www.scrantonculturalcenter.org. 800-745-3000.

    UPPER CHOIR FROM LIEBIGSCHULE, GERMANY: Sept. 25, 4 p.m., Marian Chapel, Swartz Center, Marywood University, free.

    THE LAST WALTZ LIVE: Sept. 26, Event Gallery, Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, Bethel, N.Y. Visit www.BethelWoodsCenter.org. 845-583-2060.

    STAGE

    EVITA: Phoenix Theatrics; today, 2 p.m.; Phoenix Performing Arts Centre, 409 Main St., Duryea, $12. 570-457-3589.

    TIL BETH DO US PART: today, 2:30 p.m.; Friday and Saturday, 8 p.m.; Ritz Company Playhouse, 512 Keystone St., Hawley, $10/$12. Visit www. ritzplayhouse.com. 570-226-9752.

    CYRANO – THE MUSICAL: Friday and Saturday, Sept. 12-13, 19-20, 26-27, 10 a.m., Shawnee Playhouse, Shawnee on Delaware, $11. Visit www.theshawneeplayhouse.com. 570-421-5093.

    GOD OF CARNAGE: Friday, Sept. 7, 12, 14, 2 p.m.; Saturday and Sept. 13, 8 p.m.; Shawnee Playhouse, Shawnee on Delaware, $11/$16/$19. Visit www.theshawneeplayhouse.com. 570-421-5093.

    WWE SMACKDOWN: Sept. 9, 7 p.m., Mohegan Sun Arena at Casey Plaza, Plains Twp., $15 and up. Visit www.ticket master.com. 800-745-3000.

    THE COCKTAIL HOUR: Actors Circle, Sept. 11-13, 18-20, 8 p.m.; Sept. 14 and 21, 2 p.m.; Providence Playhouse, 1256 Providence Road, $12 general admission/$10 seniors/$8 students; preview night, Sept. 11, $8 general admission and seniors/$6 students. Visit www.actorscircle.org. 570-342-9707.

    FIRST THINGS FIRST: Sept. 12-13, 19-20, 8 p.m.; Sept. 21, 2:30 p.m.; Ritz Company Playhouse, 512 Keystone St., Hawley, $10/$12. Visit www.ritzplayhouse.com. 570-226-9752.

    GUITARIST ANTON BARANOV: Sept. 13, St. Luke’s Episcopal Church, 232 Wyoming Ave., $15 adults/$10 students. Email cgsnepa@echoes.net.

    THE BRIDEGROOM OF BLOWING ROCK: Sept. 13, 7 p.m., Sept. 14, 3 p.m., Evans Theater, Dietrich Theater, Tunkhannock, $10. 570-996-1500.

    MURDER MOST FOUL: Sept. 13, 19, 20, 26, 27, bar opens 6 p.m., dinner, 6:30, curtain, 8; Sept. 14, 21 and 28, bar opens, 1 p.m., buffet, 1:30, curtain, 3; Music Box Dinner Playhouse, 196 Hughes St, Swoyersville; dinner and show, $34 adults/$28 children 12 and under; show only $16 adults/$12 children, students and members of the military. Visit www.musicbox.org. 570-283-2195 or 1-800-698-PLAY.

    COMEDY VARIETY SERIES: Sept. 13, Oct. 25, Nov. 8, Dec. 13, Jan. 10, Feb. 21, March 21, April 11 and May 9, Scranton Cultural Center at the Masonic Temple, 420 N. Washington Ave. Visit www.scrantonculturalcenter.org. 800-745-3000.

    LEND ME A TENOR: Sept. 18-19, 21, 25-26 and 28; Oct. 2-3, 5, 9-10, 12, 16-17 and 19; 2 p.m.; Sept. 20 and 27 and Oct. 4, 11 and 18, 8 p.m.; Shawnee Playhouse, Shawnee on Delaware, $16/$26/$29. Visit www.theshawneeplay house.com. 570-421-5093.

    TABLE MANNERS: University of Scranton Players, Sept. 19-20, 26-27, 8 p.m.; Sept. 21 and 28, 2 p.m.; McDade Center for Literary and Performing Arts, University of Scranton. 570-941-4318.

    THE IMPRACTICAL JOKERS: Sept. 20, 7 and 10 p.m., F.M. Kirby Center for the Performing Arts, Wilkes-Barre, $49.50/ $125. Visit www.kirbycenter.org. 570-826-1100.

    THE MUSIC MAN: Sept. 26-28, Hazleton One Community Center, Hazleton, email mcgro ganj@gmail.com. 570-454-3305.

    CHILDREN’S SERIES: Sept. 27, Nov. 8, Jan. 17, Feb. 21 and April 11, Scranton Cultural Center at The Masonic Temple, 420 N. Washington Ave. Visit www.scrantonculturalcenter.org. 800-745-3000.

    THE WHO’S TOMMY: King’s College Theatre Department, Oct. 1-6, 7:30 p.m., Oct. 4, 2 p.m., George P. Maffei II Theatre, Administration Building, King’s College, Wilkes-Barre, $12 students/$5 senior citizens. 570-208-5825.

    ART

    PARTING SHOTS: photographs by Nick Shotwell, on display through today, Camerawork Gallery, lower level Marquis Gallery, 515 Center St., free. Visit www.cameraworkgallery.org.

    A WOMAN FOR ALL SEASONS — A RETROSPECTIVE OF THE ART AND LIFE OF MARIANNE STRATFORD: on display through today, Chamber Gallery, Greater Carbondale Chamber of Commerce, 27 N. Main St., Carbondale.

    BITS AND PIECES: watercolor on illustration board by Kim Akers, on display through today, Ale Mary’s, 126 Franklin Ave.

    MINDSCAPES: works by Samantha Glevick, on display through today, ArtWorks Gallery Studio, 503 Lackawanna Ave.

    GROUP SHOW: works by multiple artists, on display through today, the Bog, 341 Adams Ave.

    A FAMILY AFFAIR PLUS ONE: acrylic paintings by Joe Paciotti; No Fret Recycled Guitar string jewelry by Ashley Paciotti; on display through today, Café Trio, Chocolate Creations and Ferrone Family Winery, 400 Spruce St.

    SCRANTON WHAT IF: works by DxDempsey Architecture, on display through today, Connell Market Space, 129 N. Washington St.

    SOARING CREATIONS: hand-painted bird houses by Sara Wasylyk, on display through today, Duffy Accessories, 218 Linden St.

    MY FIRST ART SHOW: mixed media by Dan Schaufler, on display through today, Eden — a vegan cafe, 344 Adams Ave.

    OTHER NATIONS: works by Beth Dillenbeck, on display through today, Hilton Scranton and Conference Center, 100 Adams Ave.

    REAL AMERICAN HEROES — ART INFLUENCED BY G.I. JOE: works by various artists, on display through today, the Keys Beer Spirits, 244 Penn Ave.

    LA FIN DU MONDE: works by Jacquie Delucca, on display through today, Kildare’s Irish Pub, 119 Jefferson Ave.

    TOPOGRAPHY OF LIGHT: regional landscapes and Italian plein-air studies by Brian Keeler, on display through today, Laura Craig Galleries, 207 Linden St.

    OIL PAINTINGS: works by Lynn Beers, on display through today, Library Express, Mall at Steamtown.

    VISUAL CONNECTIONS: paintings by Vicki Giordano, on display through today, Marquis Art and Frame, 515 Center St.

    PHOTOGRAPHY BY NICK SHOTWELL: Camerawork Gallery, Marquis Art and Frame, on display through today, 515 Center St.

    JAYCEES OVER THE YEARS: photos and memorabilia, on display through today, the Moonshine, 335 Adams Ave.

    ART WALK: second Friday of the month, 5 to 8 p.m., downtown Clarks Summit venues.

    JESSUP ART LOOP: second Saturday of the month, 3 to 8 p.m., downtown Jessup. Visit .

    WATERCOLORS: by Jeff Lewis, permanent display, Linda Kay’s Ole Green Ridge Diner, Sanderson Avenue.

    WATERCOLOR AND MIXED MEDIA: by Bill Woelkers, ongoing exhibit, Community Bank, 108 N. Washington Ave.

    ETC.

    KIWANIS WYOMING COUNTY FAIR: today, 8 a.m. to 11 p.m.; Monday, 8 a.m. to 9 p.m.; Route 6, Meshoppen. Visit www.wyomingcountyfair.com.

    STEAMTOWN NATIONAL HISTORIC SITE: excursions to Moscow, Sunday, departs 12:30 p.m., returns 3:30 p.m., $17/$22/$24/free for children 5 and younger; entrance fee-free days, Sept. 27 and Nov. 11; Nay Aug Limited train rides, Sundays, 10:30 and 11:30 a.m., 1:30 and 2:30 p.m., $5; Scranton Limited short train rides, Wednesdays to Saturdays, 10:30 and 11:30 a.m., 1:30 and 2:30 p.m., $5. Steamtown National Historic Site. Visit www.nps.gov/stea. 570-340-5204.

    RAILFEST: today, Steamtown National Historic Site. Visit www.nps.gov/stea.

    LA FESTA ITALIANA: today and Monday, Lackawanna County Courthouse Square, downtown Scranton. www.lafestaitaliana.org.

    RAILROAD MOVIE DAY: today, 2 p.m., Anthracite Heritage Museum, McDade Park.

    W. CURTIS MONTZ FILM SERIES: “Rear Window,” today; “Invasion of the Body Snatchers,” Sept. 14; “20 Feet from Stardom,” Sept. 28; “The Philadelphia Story,” Oct. 5; “It Happened One Night,” Oct. 12; 2 and 6 p.m., F.M. Kirby Center for the Performing Arts, Wilkes-Barre. Visit www.kirbycenter.org.

    NORTH POCONO PUBLIC LIBRARY EVENTS: preschool story hour, Tuesdays, 11 a.m.; Music and Movement, Mondays, 10 a.m., toddlers and preschoolers; lap sit story time, Fridays, 10 a.m., toddlers and preschoolers; 1315 Church St., Moscow, free. 570-842-4700.

    AUTHOR TALK FEATURING BRUCE ROSENSTEIN: author of “Create Your Future the Peter Drucker Way,” Thursday, 6 p.m., Library Express, Mall at Steamtown, free. 570-558-1670.

    FOURTH ANNUAL KING’S COLLEGE DIVERSITY FILM FESTIVAL: Thursday, Sept. 10, 17 and 24, 7 p.m. Burke Auditorium, William G. McGowan School of Business, King’s College, Wilkes-Barre, free. 570-208-8021.

    DRIVE-IN DOWNTOWN MOVIE SERIES: College Night, “Iron Man 3,” Thursday, 7:45 p.m., 200 block of North Washington Avenue, free. Visit www.scrantontomorrow.org. 570-963-1575.

    PITTSTON MEMORIAL LIBRARY EVENTS: Friends Fall Festival, Friday; Family Storytime, Mondays, 4 p.m.; Lego Club, Wednesdays, 4 to 5 p.m., ages 3 and older; Friends Fall Festival, Saturday, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.; Taste of Greater Pittston, Sept. 21, 1 to 4 p.m., $30; Greater Pittston Charity Train Ride to historic Jim Thorpe,Sept. 28, seating limited, 570-457-6558; Christmas trip to Radio City Christmas show, Dec. 1, 570-654-2967;Crochet Club, Tuesdays, 10 a.m., and Thursdays, 5 p.m.; story time,Tuesdays and Wednesdays; beginner computer class,Thursdays, 10 to 11 a.m.; Teen Advisory Group, second Thursday of the month, 5:30 p.m.; 47 Broad St., Pittston, registration requested for most activities. 570-654-9565.

    INFECT SCRANTON: Friday through Sept. 7, various locations, Scranton. infectscran ton.com.

    NORTHEAST SUICIDE PREVENTION INITIATIVE SHARE THE JOURNEY SUICIDE PREVENTION WALK: Saturday, registration 9 a.m., walk 10 a.m., Lackawanna County Courthouse Square, donations accepted, benefits local incentives. Visit www.northeastsuicideprevention initiative.org. 570-575-2343.

    LACKAWANNA HISTORICAL SOCIETY GUIDED WALKING TOURS OF DOWNTOWN SCRANTON: Saturday, meet at Linden Street and North Washington Avenue; Sept. 13, meet at Lackawanna College, 501 Vine St.; 11 a.m., free, reservations required by Thursday before tour. 570-344-3841.

    SNAKES ALIVE!: presented by Rick Koval, Saturday, 11 a.m., Dietrich Theater, Tunkhannock, free. 570-996-1500.

    MONTAGE MOUNTAIN EVENTS: Comedy Night, Saturday, Slocum Hollow Bar and Restaurant; 1000 Montage Mountain Road. Visit www.montage mountainresorts.com.

    GUIDED TREE WALK: Sept. 7, 11 a.m. and 1:30 p.m., Grey Towers National Historic Site, 122 Old Owego Turnpike, Milford, $8 adults/$7 seniors/$5 kids/children under 12 free. Visit www.greytowers.org or www.fs.fed.us/gt. 570-296-9630.

    ARTS/ANTIQUES SHOW: Sept. 7, Creekside Grove, Lenoxville. 570-960-2754 or 570-785-5960.

    MILFORD’S SEVENTH ANNUAL SHARE THE HARVEST PARTY: Sept. 9, 6 to 9 p.m., River Rock Inn, Milford, $30, benefits Milford Ecumenical Food Pantry. 570-296-5662.

    LACKAWANNA COUNTY COMMISSION FOR WOMEN LEGISLATIVE BREAKFAST: Sept. 10, 8:30 a.m., La Buona Vita, Dunmore, $20. 570 963-6800.

    BAD MOVIE THURSDAYS WITH MST3K: Sept. 11, Oct. 2, Nov. 6, Dec. 4, Jan. 22, Feb. 19, March 19 and April 16, Scranton Cultural Center at the Masonic Temple, 420 N. Washington Ave. Visit www.scrantonculturalcenter.org. 800-745-3000.

     

    PA OKTOBERFEST: Sept. 12-14, Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs, Plains Twp., 21 and older. Visit www.paoktoberfest.com.

    COAL CRACKER SMOKE AND STOKE BARBEQUE COMPETITION: Sept. 12, 4 to 11 p.m.; Sept. 13, 10 a.m. to 9 p.m., Montage Mountain Resorts, benefits West Scranton Hyde Park Neighborhood Watch, Inc. Visit www.coal crackersmokeandstokebbq.com or www.scrantonbbq.com.

    DO IT ITEMS should be sent at least two weeks prior

    to event to lifestyles@times

    shamrock.com or Times-Tribune Lifestyles Department, Attn:

    Lifestyles Dept., 149 Penn Ave., Scranton, PA 18503.

    CARE NET PREGNANCY CENTER OF SCRANTON WALK FOR LIFE: Sept. 13, registration 9 a.m., walk 10 a.m., Lackawanna County Courthouse Square, Scranton, $25/children 12 and under free. Visit carenetofscranton.com/Fundraising/WalkforLife/tabid/145/Default.aspx. 570-207-1907.

    WILLIAM WALKER HOSE COMPANY GOLF TOURNAMENT: Sept. 13, 9 a.m., Sleepy Hollow Golf Course, 140 Sandy Banks Road, Greenfield Twp., $75 individual/$300 team. Visit www.cornnclamslam.com. 570-466-4835 or 570-840-3414.

    CAR CRUISE: Sept. 13, 5 p.m., McDonald’s, Route 590, Hamlin.

    TERESA’S ANGELS BALL PRESENTS LEXI MATONE’S SEMI FORMAL: Sept. 13, 7 p.m., St. Mary’s Center, 320 Mifflin Ave., $25 individuals/$40 couples/$13 children 6-12/$6 children 5 and under, benefits family of Lexi Matone. Visit www.payitsquare.com/collect-page/8000. 570-842-8293 or 570-499-9390.

    COAL CRACKER CRUISERS/BOY SCOUT TROOP 87 OF MAYFIELD 16TH ANNUAL CAR SHOW: Sept. 14, 9 a.m., Carbondale Area High School. 570-876-4034.

    CUTS FOR A CURE: Sept. 14, Brooks Co., Gateway Shopping Center, Edwardsville, benefits Pancreatic Cancer Action Network via the Alfred “Fritz” Hall Legacy Fund. 570-714-4247.

    GUIDED NATURE WALKS: tree walk, Sept. 14, 2 p.m., Florence Shelly Wetlands Preserve parking lot, Route 171 and Stack Road, Thompson. 570-727-3362.

    NICHOLSON BRIDGE DAY: Sept. 14, Nicholson, 570-942-6747 or 570-942-4481; inaugural talent show, registration 10:30 a.m., contest 11 a.m., Main Street, 5 and older, registration requested before Sept. 14, 570-942-4191.

    COUNTRYSIDE CONSERVANCY EVENTS: 20th annual Tailgate Picnic Potluck, Sept. 14, 3 p.m. to dusk, Little Rocky Glen Preserve, Lithia Valley Road, Clinton Twp., Wyoming County, free for members/$10 nonmembers, take a dish to share. Visit www.countrysideconservancy.org.

    ROTARY CLUB OF THE ABINGTONS 10TH ANNUAL TASTE OF THE ABINGTONS: Sept. 14, 5 to 8 p.m., Nichols Village Hotel Spa, 1101 Northern Blvd., Clarks Summit, $25. 570-586-6931.

    FRIENDS OF THE SCRANTON PUBLIC LIBRARY BOOK SALE: Sept. 16-18, 10 a.m. to 8 p.m.; Sept. 19-20, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Sept. 21, 2 to 4 p.m.; Library Express, Mall at Steamtown.

    SS. CYRIL AND METHODIUS UKRAINIAN CATHOLIC CHURCH FOURTH ANNUAL RUMMAGE SALE: Sept. 19-20, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.; Sept. 21, 8 a.m. to 2 p.m.; American Legion Hall, Raymond Henry Post 327, 101 Willow Ave., Olyphant. 570-489-2271 or 570-383-0319.

    NORTHEAST REGIONAL CANCER INSTITUTE 22ND ANNUAL CANCER SURVIVORS CELEBRATION: Sept. 20, Kirby Park, Wilkes-Barre; Sept. 27, McDade Park; 10 a.m. to noon, register by Sept. 12. Visit www.cancernepa.org. 800-424-672.

    POCONO ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION CENTER ACTIVITIES: Wild Things Ball, Sept. 20, 6 to 10 p.m., Hotel Fauchere, Milford.

    SECOND FIELD TO MAIN DINNER: Sept. 20, 6 p.m., The Cooperage Project, 1030 Main St., Honesdale, $75. Visit www.thecooperageproject.org. 570-253-2020.

    SCARS STRIPES: THE REMARKABLE STORY OF WAVERLY’S BLACK CIVIL WAR SOLDIERS: presented by Lackawanna Historical Society and Waverly Community House, Sept. 21, 2 p.m., Waverly Community House, 1115 North Abington Road, Waverly Twp. 570-344-3841.

    FOURTH ANNUAL RUNWAY FASHION SHOW: Sept. 21, 2 to 4 p.m., St. Mary’s Center, 320 Mifflin Ave., $2/$5, benefits Delta Medix Foundation for Cancer Care. 570-342-3271.

    AMERICAN RED CROSS LACKAWANNA CHAPTER 12TH ANNUAL GOLF TOURNAMENT: Sept. 22, registration 11 a.m.; shotgun start 12:30 p.m.; Glenmaura National Golf Club, Moosic, $300; rain date, Oct. 13. 570-207-0108.

    THE MENU: Sept. 22, Oct. 27, Nov. 24, Dec. 8, Jan. 19, Feb. 23, March 23, April 20 and May 11, Shopland Hall, Scranton Cultural Center at the Masonic Temple, 420 N. Washington Ave. Visit www.scrantonculturalcenter.org. 800-745-3000.

    DELAWARE WATER GAP NATIONAL RECREATION AREA SUMMER PROGRAMS: waterfall walks, Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays through summer, 11 a.m. and 2 p.m., Dingmans Falls Visitor Center; evening campfire programs, Fridays and Saturdays through summer, 7 p.m., Dingmans Campground, Route 209, Dingmans Ferry; free. Visit www.facebook.com/DelWaterGapNPS or www.nps.gov/dewa. 570-426-2452 or 570-828-2253.

    EMMITT SMITH: Lackawanna County Library System’s 2014 American Masters Lecture, Sept. 23, 7 p.m., Scranton Cultural Center at The Masonic Temple, 420 N. Washington Ave., free with library card. 570-348-3000.

    LACKAWANNA COLLEGE ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION CENTER EVENTS: Salamander Safari, Sept. 24, 5:30 to 7:00 p.m., $5; Natural Wonders: Apples Abound, Sept. 25, 1 to 2:30 p.m., children ages 3-6, $45 for series of six classes; Scout Program, Sept. 30, 5 to 7 p.m.; Wild Edible Plant Walk , Oct. 1, 5:30 to 7 p.m., $5; Natural Wonders: Terrific Trees, Oct. 9, 1 to 2:30 p.m., children ages 3-6, $45 for six classes; Kathy Miller: Author Visit Nature Program , Oct. 22, 6:30 to 7:30 p.m., $5; Natural Wonders: Spooky Spiders , Oct. 23, 1 to 2:30 p.m., children ages 3-6, $45 for six classes; Lackawanna College Environmental Education Center, 93 MacKenzie Road, Covington Township. 570-842-1506.

    PROSPER 5K RUN/WALK: Sept. 27, registration 7:30 to 8:30 a.m., run/walk 9 a.m., Olive Street trailhead, Lackawanna River Heritage Trail, email kat1@psu.edu, benefits drug/alcohol prevention programs in Lackawanna County schools. 570-963-6842.

    ALL SAINTS ACADEMY 5K: Sept. 27, McDade Park.

    AMERICAN CULINARY FEDERATION OF PROFESSIONAL CHEFS OF NEPA SECOND BEER PAIRING DINNER: Sept. 29, 6 p.m., Vanderlyn’s Resturant, 239 Schuyler Ave., Kingston, $65. 570-574-9310.

    CENTURY CLUB CENTENNIAL GALA: Oct. 2, 6 p.m., Century Club, 612 Jefferson Ave. 570-344-3841.

    OLD STONE JAIL TOURS: first Saturday of the month through October, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., 10th Street, Honesdale, free.

    INAUGURAL SCRANTON MINI MAKER FAIRE: Oct. 4, 10 a.m. to 7 p.m., Johnson College, 3427 N. Main Ave., $5/free for children and students. Visit www.scrantonmakerfaire.com.

    DEARLY DEPARTED PLAYERS’ DUNMORE CEMETERY TOUR: Oct. 5 and 12, 2 p.m., Dunmore Cemetery, West Warren and Church streets, Dunmore, free. 570-344-3819.

    INAUGURAL NORTHEASTERN PENNSYLVANIA BARTENDER’S BALL: Oct. 5, 6 to 9 p.m., Radisson at Lackawanna Station hotel, 700 Lackawanna Ave., black tie optional, $50 advance/$60 at door, benefits Scranton police and fire departments. Visit www.nepabartendersball.com.

    HAWLEY FIRE DEPARTMENT EVENTS: indoor flea market/bake sale, Oct. 11, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., benefits fire department, 570-290-1488; model train show sale, Oct. 12, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., 570-226-3206, $3/free for children 12 and younger, benefits fire department; Hawley Fire House, 17 Columbus Ave., Hawley, email hawleyfd@ptd.net. 570-226-9820.

    HARVEST HERITAGE DAYS: Oct. 11-12, downtown Honesdale. Visit visithonesdalepa.com. 570-253-5492.

    BLACK BEAR FILM FESTIVAL: Oct. 17-19, Historic Milford Theatre, 114 E. Catharine St., and Community Room, Pike County Public Library, Milford. Visit www.blackbearfilm.com.

    ZOMBIE DANCE PARTY/ROCKY HORROR PICTURE SHOW SCREENING: Oct. 17; party, 8:30 to 11:30 p.m.; screening, midnight; Scranton Cultural Center at the Masonic Temple, 420 N. Washington Ave. Visit www.scrantonculturalcenter.org. 800-745-3000.

    LUZERNE COUNTY COMMUNITY COLLEGE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 25TH ANNUAL FALL CRAFT FESTIVAL: Oct. 18, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., LCCC campus, Nanticoke. 570-740-0735.

    COUNTRY CHRISTMAS FAIR: Oct. 18, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Clarks Summit United Methodist Church, Morgan Highway, Clarks Summit, $1 adults/children 12 and under free.

    LOCK 31 D H CANAL PARK EVENTS: Friends of the Canal Park annual Thank You Party, Oct. 18; Route 6, between Hawley and White Mills. Visit www.wchs-lock31.org or www.WayneHistoryPA.org.

    ROYDEN B. DAVIS, S.J., DISTINGUISHED AUTHOR AWARD BOOK SIGNING/RECEPTION: with author Colum McCann, Oct. 18; book signing, 4 to 5 p.m., fourth-floor reception area, DeNaples Center, University of Scranton, free; reception/dinner, 5 p.m., McIlhenny Ballroom, DeNaples Center, reservations required; email Kym.Festo@scranton.edu. 570-941-7816.

    THRILL THE WORLD: international zombie flash mob, Oct. 25, 4 p.m., dance 5 p.m., outside Scranton Cultural Center at the Masonic Temple, 420 N. Washington Ave., $5/$25; zombie crawl, follows dance, downtown Scranton. Visit www.scrantonculturalcenter.org. 800-745-3000.

    BIG BAND JAZZ DANCING: Oct. 26, 6 to 9 p.m., Latour Room, Nazareth Hall Student Center, Marywood University, free.

    AMERICAN CANCER SOCIETY LOOK GOOD FEEL BETTER: make-up sessions for women undergoing cancer treatment; Oct. 27 and Dec. 22, 4:30 p.m., Northeast Radiation Oncology Center, 1110 Meade St., Dunmore; Sept. 8 and Nov. 10, 5:30 p.m., and Oct. 13, noon, conference room, Candy’s Place – The Center for Wellness, 190 Welles St., Forty Fort; free, reservations recommended. 800-227-2345.

    SOME ENCHANTED EVENING AND PRESIDENT’S RECEPTION: Nov. 15, Scranton Cultural Center at the Masonic Temple, 420 N. Washington Ave., benefits cultural center. Visit www.scrantonculturalcenter.org. 800-745-3000.

    JEWELRY, GEMS AND STOCKING-STUFFERS ANTIQUE SHOW: Nov. 21 and 22, Greater Carbondale Chamber of Commerce Building, 27 N. Main St., Carbondale, $6. 570-960-2754.

    HONESDALE FOR THE HOLIDAYS: Nov. 28-29, downtown Honesdale. Visit visithonesdalepa.com. 570-253-5492.

    BUY LOCAL MARKETPLACES: Nov. 30 and March 22, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Scranton Cultural Center at the Masonic Temple, 420 N. Washington Ave., free. Visit www.scrantonculturalcenter.org. 800-745-3000.

    BREAKFAST WITH SANTA AND THE HAPPY ELF CAST: Dec. 7, Scranton Cultural Center at the Masonic Temple, 420 N. Washington Ave. Visit www.scrantonculturalcenter.org. 800-745-3000.

    DR. SEUSS BIRTHDAY BASH: Feb. 28, Scranton Cultural Center at the Masonic Temple, 420 N. Washington Ave. Visit www.scrantonculturalcenter.org. 800-745-3000.

    ST. PATRICK’S PARADE DAY PARTY: March 14, Scranton Cultural Center at the Masonic Temple, 420 N. Washington Ave., free. Visit www.scrantonculturalcenter.org. 800-745-3000.

    15TH ANNUAL AN EVENING OF FINE FOOD AND WINE: April 26, Scranton Cultural Center at the Masonic Temple, 420 N. Washington Ave., benefits cultural center. Visit www.scrantonculturalcenter.org. 800-745-3000.

    NEPA STARS AWARDS: May 31, Scranton Cultural Center at the Masonic Temple, 420 N. Washington Ave. Visit www.scrantonculturalcenter.org. 800-745-3000.

    GREY TOWERS MANSION TOURS: daily, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.; Grey Towers National Historic Site, 122 Old Owego Turnpike, Milford. 570-296-9630. Visit www.greytowers.org or www.fs.fed.us/gt.

    HISTORIC DOWNTOWN SCRANTON GHOST WALKS: daily, 8 p.m., $15/$20, reservations required. Visit scrantonghosttours.com. 570-383-1821.

    CLIFFORD TWP. HISTORICAL SOCIETY HISTORICAL TOURS: third Sunday of the month through October; Hoover School, 2244 Route 2014; Museum of Local History, 119 Cemetery St.; and Clifford Baptist Church, Church Street; Clifford Twp.; email peltz@nep.net. Visit www.Cliffordpa.com. 570-679-2723.

    NANCY KAY HOLMES BRANCH LIBRARY EVENTS: yoga class, Mondays, 10 a.m., adults; Story Time, Mondays and Fridays, 11:30 a.m., all ages; Bookworm Buddies, Mondays, 3:30 p.m., ages 6 to 8; Young Adult Club, Mondays, 5 to 6 p.m., ages 12 to 17; Lil’ Library Learners, Tuesdays, 1 p.m., registration required; CRAFTernoon, Fridays, 3 to 4:30 p.m., 3 and older; Green Ridge Street and Wyoming Avenue. 570-207-0764.

    ABINGTON COMMUNITY LIBRARY ACTIVITIES: Caring Hands Group, Mondays, 1 p.m., grade seven to adults; mahjong/bridge, Tuesdays, 1 to 3 p.m., adults; bridge group, Wednesdays, 10 a.m. to noon, adults; Scrabble, Thursdays, 1 p.m., adults; 1200 W. Grove St., Clarks Summit. Visit www.lclshome.org/abington.

    EVERYBODY EATS FREE MEAL AND LIVE MUSIC: third Monday of every month, 6 to 7:30 p.m., Myrtle Street United Methodist Church, 840 Harrison Ave., free, food pantry/winter clothing/blanket donations accepted. 570-346-9911.

    HAWLEY PUBLIC LIBRARY CHILDREN’S ACTIVITIES: role-playing game, Tuesdays, 3:30 p.m.; Music and Movement, Wednesdays, 10:30 a.m.; story time, Wednesdays, 12:30 p.m.; Read with Tess, Wednesdays through summer, 3 to 5 p.m.; Read with Twiggy, Thursdays, 3 to 5 p.m.; parent/child workshop, Fridays, 10:30 a.m. and 12:30 p.m.; 103 Main Ave., Hawley. 570-226-4620.

    CRAFT NIGHT: Tuesdays, 7 p.m., The Vintage Theater, 326 Spruce St., free, donations accepted. Visit www.scrantonsvintagetheater.com. 570-507-9671.

    DORFLINGER GLASS MUSEUM: Wednesdays through Saturdays, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.; Sundays, 1 to 4 p.m., White Mills. Visit www.dorflinger.org. 570-253-1185.

    TASTES OF WAYNE — FIRST WEDNESDAYS: first Wednesday of the month, various Wayne County restaurants, benefits Wayne County Historical Society, email wchs@ptd.net. Visit www.waynehistorypa.org. 570-448-2130.

    TROLLEY EXCURSIONS: Thursdays to Sundays, 10:30 a.m., noon, 1:30 and 3 p.m., Electric City Trolley Museum, 300 Cliff St. 570-963-6590.

    WRITERS’ GROUP: Thursdays, 7 to 8:30 p.m., Dietrich Theater, 60 E. Tioga St., Tunkhannock, free, 18 and older. 570-996-1500.

    MUSEUM WITHOUT WALLS: activities for children, first Thursday of every month, 5:30 to 7:30 p.m., Ben-Mar Restaurant, 89 N. Main St., Carbondale, $10 per child. Visit www.theAHDC.com. 570-282-1771.

    EVERHART READS BOOK CLUB: third Thursday of the month, 6 p.m., Library Express, Mall at Steamtown. 570-346-7186.

    WEST PITTSTON LIBRARY EVENTS: weekly story time, Fridays, 1 p.m., free; book club, first Tuesday of the month, 6:45 p.m., free; West Pittston Library, 200 Exeter Ave., West Pittston. 570-654-9847.

    PIKE COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY EVENTS: The Columns mansion tours, Fridays, 6 to 8 p.m.; museum, Wednesdays and Fridays, 6 to 8 p.m., Saturdays and Sundays, 1 to 4 p.m. Visit www.pikecountyhistoricalsociety.org.

     

    TASTINGS AND DEMOS: Saturdays, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Mill Market, Hawley Silk Mill, Suite 111, 8 Silk Mill Drive, Hawley, free, info@millmarketPA.com. Visit MillMarketPA.com. 570-390-4440.

    HOUDINI MUSEUM TOUR AND MAGIC SHOW: weekends, 1 to 4:30 p.m., 1433 N. Main Ave., $17.95 adults/$14.95 children 11 and younger in advance, $20 at door, reservations recommended. Visit houdini.org. 570-342-5555.

    HISTORY MYSTERY TOUR MAGIC WORKSHOP: year-round, 10 a.m., Scranton Cultural Center at The Masonic Temple, 420 N. Washington Ave.

    A DAY AT THE CULTURAL CENTER: year-round, 10 a.m., Scranton Cultural Center at The Masonic Temple, 420 N. Washington Ave.

    Category: Accessories  Tags: ,  Comments off

    It’s Your Business: Sharing the Magic – Champaign/Urbana News

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    Professional magician Andy Dallas, who has escaped from water coffins and body bags, is now attempting his latest feat: extricating himself from his costume and magic business.

    Dallas is turning over management of Dallas Co. Costumes Magic to his son, Rob, and daughter-in-law, Ashley.

    “I’m really trying to push this as fast as I can, so I can pursue other things, magically and otherwise,” said Dallas, 65, whose costume shop has been at the corner of First Street and University Avenue in Champaign for about 35 years.

    Rob, 28, has been involved in the company since 2008. Now that he and wife Ashley are managing the business, they’ve reorganized the store.

    One of the changes: putting children’s costumes close to the ground, so kids can easily spy Captain America, Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles and characters from the Disney movie “Frozen.”

    Rob majored in entrepreneurship at Millikin University, graduating in 2008.

    While in college, he considered starting a watch-and-jewelry business and a car remodeling business. But he concluded that “starting a business was more difficult than running an established one.”

    Ashley went to nursing school, but decided she liked business better.

    Don’t expect the new management to alter the surreal, quirky and ghastly nature of Dallas Co.

    The store still has the 12-1/2-foot-tall angry gorilla lurking above the showroom; the 6-foot-tall sitting clown with a recorded laugh that once occupied a “fun house” in Benton Harbor, Mich.; and of course, the ever-popular “puking man” who regurgitates water when you press a button.

    And Dallas Co. still has its “haunted room,” where witches, zombies and a host of other nasties pop up and fly into your face as you pass through.

    “I didn’t want to make it a store, I wanted to make it a destination,” Andy Dallas said of his business at 101 E. University Ave.

    That’s exactly what it’s become, meriting mention on the roadsideamerica.com website, along with the Big Cheesy Noodle in front of the Kraft plant, the Giant Indian sculpture at Curtis Orchard and the Roger Ebert sculpture outside the Virginia Theatre.

    Dallas, who has been recovering from surgery earlier this year, has a list of things he wants to do once he is retired from the business.

    Lecturing and performing are high on the list. Dallas, who served as president of the Society of American Magicians in 2006-07, plans to lecture and teach a master class at next year’s convention.

    He’s also hoping to perform another series of shows at Busboom Castle in northwest Champaign County — plus he has plans for a new business that he’s not willing to talk about yet.

    After all, a magician doesn’t reveal his secrets.

    Dallas got into the costume business by happenstance. He initially owned a pinball arcade in Campustown. When he put a few masks on the wall, customers clamored for them.

    About that time, needles and razors started showing up in apples and candy put in trick-or-treat bags. Halloween suddenly changed from a children’s holiday to an adult holiday, Dallas said.

    “Everything converted to Halloween parties,” he said, and the demand for costumes was “male-dominated.”

    The business moved several times and adopted the Novelty Village name before landing at First and University under the Dallas Co. moniker.

    In the decades since, Dallas has seen numerous changes. A few years ago, the ratio of costumes to accessories was 60/40. Now it’s reversed.

    No longer is the costume business male-dominated. “Now most of the costumes are female,” Dallas said.

    In recent years, Mardi Gras-style eye masks have become popular. They’re even used at proms, he said.

    “It’s a pop-culture business,” Dallas said. “The movies bring in something new. First it was ‘bubba’ teeth, then vampires, now zombies are big.”

    That ever-changing demand for the latest trend kept Dallas on his toes.

    “It’s tricky, You have to keep your eye on the business. It changes on a dime,” he said.

    To succeed, he said, he found he needed to carry three types of goods:

    — Bread-and-butter items such as tooth black and spirit gum.

    — New items such as a “fan brush” that allows people to simultaneously paint red, white and blue stripes on their face.

    — Unique accessories — such as monocles — that other stores might not think of carrying.

    Dallas said Rob and Ashley are well-positioned going into Halloween season the next two years.

    Halloween falls on a Friday this year and on a Saturday in 2015, making those holidays potentially more lucrative for Dallas Co. than years when Halloween falls on a weekday.

    Jimmy Jimmy John John’s

    Danville staff writer Tracy Moss reports that a second Jimmy John’s will open in Danville this fall.

    Seth Hobbs, owner and manager of the Jimmy John’s at 3120 N. Vermilion St., said plans are in the works for a second, bigger store at 306 W. Fairchild St.

    That location would be next door to Papa John’s on the southeast corner of Fairchild and Gilbert streets.

    The layout and look of the new Jimmy John’s will be similar to the existing store, but will be able to seat more customers — about 50, Hobbs said.

    “It will extend our delivery zone big-time,” he added.

    Hobbs doesn’t know the exact delivery area for the new location, but he expects it to serve all medical facilities in the area and most of downtown.

    Renovations should begin soon, with the goal of being open in early November.

    Tentative hours will be 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. seven days a week.

    The new store is expected to employ about 35. There won’t be a drive-up, but in the spring, an outdoor seating area may be added.

    However, a drive-up will be considered at the store on North Vermilion Street, he added.

    Catering biz booming

    Hendrick House Catering is doing so much business these days, it’s adding a new catering kitchen at 801 W. Killarney St., U.

    “We’ve just expanded so much,” said Sue Dawson, vice president of food service for Hendrick Dorms Inc.

    “With the expansion of our catering business, our Greek food service business on campus, our farm operation and our food truck, we need more production space,” she said.

    Dawson said she hopes the new space, just off North Lincoln Avenue in Urbana, will be ready before Christmas.

    The building most recently housed Jericho Missionary Baptist Church, before its move to 1601 W. Bloomington Road, C.

    Hendrick House Catering is remodeling the southeast end of the building for the kitchen and eventually hopes to turn the other end of the building — the former sanctuary — into event space, Dawson said.

    The catering business is based at Hendrick House, 904 W. Green St., U, but operates from about 30 locations, including fraternities, sororities and residence halls.

    Most recently, the catering business began providing food service for Newman Hall, in addition to Armory House, Presby Hall and Nika House residence halls.

    The “farm operation” that Dawson mentioned started out two years ago as two 30-foot plots at Meadowbrook Park in Urbana.

    Last year, it graduated to a half-acre plot at the Student Sustainable Farm on campus.

    The farm provides the catering firm’s clients with tomatoes, green peppers, green beans and greens, such as spinach and kale. The rooftop garden atop Hendrick House furnishes herbs and cherry tomatoes.

    “Next year, we’re hoping to expand to 2 acres — and up to 3 or 4 acres,” Dawson said.

    Meanwhile, the Hendrick House food truck continues to serve chicken-and-waffles and side dishes at Market at the Square in Urbana and at events in the University of Illinois Research Park and Clark Park in Champaign.

    The truck is slated to appear at the Pygmalion Festival in late September and at events for fraternities, sororities and residence halls on campus.

    But the truck doesn’t keep a day-in, day-out schedule on campus during the school year.

    It’s mainly used “as a marketing tool and as backup for existing clients,” Dawson said.

    Hendrick House Catering has “175 employees and growing,” she added.

    Half-century party

    Caitlin Richardson, the 2013 winner of The Chorale Young Artist Scholarship Award, will provide musical entertainment for the 50th anniversary celebration of Renner-Wikoff Chapel’s Philo Road location.

    The event is set for 5 to 8 p.m. Saturday at 1900 S. Philo Road, U.

    Refreshments will be served, and a DVD outlining a history of the funeral home business will be shown.

    Stephen Ater, who has co-owned Renner-Wikoff with Matt Schable since 2012, said there will be tours of the building.

    He said he is often asked by visitors whether they can see the crematorium, and this will be a chance for them to see it if they wish.

    Ater said his research showed that two funeral directors by the names of Asbury Shuck and Samuel Fox did business in downtown Urbana — first at 116 W. Main St., and then at 157 W. Main St., before renting a building owned by the Enos Renner livery service at 206 E. Main St.

    Renner later purchased the funeral business and eventually moved it to the former home of Judge William Somers at Race and Green streets in Urbana.

    Renner provided ambulance service with horse-drawn vehicles, and after he moved the business to the Somers home, he ran the first motorized ambulance service in the area, Ater said.

    P.T. Wikoff acquired the business in 1930, and the Wikoff family moved the funeral home to Philo Road in the early 1960s after selling the downtown Urbana property for the development of Lincoln Square Mall.

    ‘Smoothies for Service’

    Public safety workers are getting a bonus from area McDonald’s stores.

    During the week of Sept. 8-12, McDonald’s Restaurants of Central Illinois will offer a free small McCafe Smoothie to local police officers, firefighters and emergency medical services workers.

    All the public safety workers have to do is show their state-issued identification card.

    The smoothies come in three flavors — blueberry-pomegranate, strawberry-banana and mango-pineapple — and are made with fruit, fruit juice and low-fat yogurt. But McDonald’s said the smoothies can also be made without the low-fat yogurt.

    Film showings offered

    The Reading Group in Champaign has acquired public performance rights to show “The Big Picture: Rethinking Dyslexia,” a one-hour film about the learning disability.

    The organization is offering to show the film to area groups interested in learning more about dyslexia.

    The organization has already shown the movie at the Art Theater, the Champaign Public Library, the Urbana Free Library and Stone Creek Church.

    The film, directed by Robert Redford’s son James, discusses myths, stigmas and truths surrounding dyslexia, clears up misconceptions and provides information on new scientific and neurological research.

    It shows how dyslexics can learn and also points out advantages that can accompany the condition.

    For more information, contact The Reading Group’s executive director, Jennifer Bell, 351-9144.

    Contact Don Dodson at 351-5227; by email at dodson@news-gazette.com; or by regular mail at The News-Gazette, c/o It’s Your Business column, P.O. Box 677, Champaign, IL 61824-0677.

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    NerdWallet: What not to buy on Labor Day

    You’re ready to hit the Labor Day sales. You made your list, you’ve compared deals and you’ve got your game face on. But there’s one thing you may not know: Sometimes, the smartest way to shop is not to.

    Indeed, certain items are actually best bought long after Labor Day sales have come and gone. Before you hit the stores this weekend, do your homework by browsing NerdWallet Shopping’s DealFinder to compare prices and avoid “deals” that aren’t really deals.

    Here are five things that you shouldn’t buy this Labor Day:

    Electronics

    Labor Day sale ads often tout deals on electronics, but the best time to get a deep discount on this stuff is later in the year, during the Black Friday sales frenzy. If you’re looking for televisions, computers, laptops, video game systems, camcorders, GPS navigators or digital cameras, the end-of-year discounts are worth the wait.

    Fall clothing

    Since Labor Day weekend is the unofficial start of fall, stores are rolling out their trendy cool-weather apparel—and often advertising them as being on sale. But fall and winter clothing will not reach its lowest price until later in the season. The higher priority for clothing stores is to get rid of summer clothing, which is quickly losing its usefulness and, in some cases, going out of style. So, at least for this weekend, you’re better off buying next year’s swimsuit than this year’s sweater.

    Patio furniture

    After Labor Day, it’s out with the old and in with the new when it comes to summer’s must-haves. Prices on patio furniture, outdoor accessories and pool supplies will hit rock bottom later in September. The further away from summer we get, the more desperate stores are to unload summer goods and make room for winter gear, which equals lots of clearances and discounts. If you’re thinking of updating your outdoor-living essentials, try to push your purchases as deep into September as possible.

    Toys

    For children’s toys, think Christmas: Toys reach their lowest prices in anticipation of the holiday season. For great deals on existing toy models, shop in October or November, when stores are making room for the hottest new toys. If you want one of those buzzy new items, alas; this year’s Zhu Zhu Pet or Big Hugs Elmo won’t be discounted until late December, when the hype has started to fade. So hold off on toy purchases for a month or two—if the kids in your life can wait.

    Cookware

    With the holiday season looming, now would seem a good time to beat the rush and stock up on cookware for your holiday feasting. But if you want the best deal on kitchen appliances and baking essentials, hold off a while longer. November and December are the best months of the year for purchasing cookware. This includes everything from cutlery and bakeware to small appliances.

    So go ahead and hit those Labor Day sales—there are plenty of deals to be had. Let this advice be your guide, and remember: Patience can be a shopping virtue.

    MORE: Labor Day sales 2014: The best deals and discounts

    MORE:Labor Day travel deals: The best getaway discounts

    MORE:9 bad financial habits you need to break right now

    NerdWallet is a USA TODAY content partner providing general news, commentary and coverage from around the Web. Its content is produced independently of USA TODAY.

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    Sunday business briefs – The News

    Stacy’s Golden Hanger open in Naples

    Stacy Braverman opened Stacy’s Golden Hanger at 2355 Vanderbilt Beach Road, Suite 168 in the Shoppes at Vanderbilt in Naples.

    The 1,800 square foot specialty shop offers a variety of ready-to-wear, special occasion and custom clothes for boys and girls of every age. The store sells also accessories, shoes and jewelry. Custom alterations as well as private appointments for custom clothing will also be available.

    For information, call 431-8440 or email stacysgoldenhanger@gmail.com.

    Waterside launches revamped website

    Waterside Shops has launched a revamped and enhanced website at watersideshops.com.

    The new website features a more fashion-centric look, tone and feel while offering a more user-friendly site for customers and retailers.

    The homepage will feature an enhanced listing of all Waterside Shops retailers, upcoming events, blog posts and a “Trend Spotter” section featuring fashion look books, videos and images from each retailer.

    For information, call 598-1605.

    Women in Business Wine Auction set

    The Greater Fort Myers Chamber of Commerce September Women in Business meeting is a signature event featuring a wine auction will take place on Wednesday from 4-6 p.m. at the new Scanlon Lexus building, 14200 S. Tamiami Trail, in Fort Myers.

    Guests can bid on silent auction items or participate in the live auction. Proceeds from auction benefit the Women in Business Scholarship Fund that supports nontraditional female students demonstrating financial need, with preference given to single, divorced or widowed women with children.

    Donated items are being accepted including wine, wine accessories, gift baskets, gift certificates, and gift cards.

    Admission is $10 for chamber members and $20 for future members.

    For information, call 332-3624 or visit fortmyers.org.

    Stevens completes building renovation

    Stevens Construction has completed the renovation of the 16,097-square-foot building located at 7381 College Parkway.

    The project included an upgrade of the entire exterior façade from the former Jalapeno’s restaurant to a new plaza which houses Physicians’ Primary Care and Blue Moon Pizza. The remaining tenant space is available for lease.

    Physicians’ Primary Care accommodates 10,612 square feet of the building and includes 22 exam rooms, eight physician offices, ultrasound, laboratory, nurse stations, staff lounge, reception and waiting areas. The tenant improvement was designed by Burt Hill/Pollock Krieg Architects, Inc.

    Blue Moon Pizza, a 3,474-square-foot pizza restaurant, includes a bar, dining area, kitchen, and take-out/curbside delivery room. Designed by Sheeley Architects, the restaurant also includes a 1,410-square-foot covered patio for outdoor dining.

    The Stevens Construction team consists of Trent Swartz as project manager, Mark Jackson and Will Houser as superintendents and Sue Ziengenfus as project administrator.

    FPRA board to be inducted Tuesday

    The Southwest Florida Chapter of the Florida Public Relations Association will induct the 2014-15 board of directors and leadership team at a lunch meeting Tuesday from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Crowne Plaza Hotel at Bell Tower Shops in Fort Myers.

    Heidi Taulman, executive director for Lee Building Industry Association Builders Care, Inc., will be named president of the Southwest Florida Chapter.

    The Southwest Florida Chapter of FPRA 2014-15 board of directors includes past president, Samantha Scott; president-elect, Trish Robertson; treasurer, Tiffany Whitaker; secretary, Vicki Collins; vice president of communications, Angie Strait; vice president of member relations, Jaimie Duthoy; vice president professional development, Kate Gooderham; and vice president of community relations, Jessica Boles.

    For information, visit fpraswfl.org.

    Expedia names Sanibel resort

    Sanibel Moorings Condominium Resort has been named to the Expedia Insiders’ Select list for 2014, an annual ranking of the best-reviewed hotels. The list recognizes the top-ranked hotels available worldwide on Expedia.

    The 2014 list names only 650 hotels as Insiders’ Select hotels from among the more than 290,000 bookable properties available on Expedia, Inc. websites worldwide.

    For information, visit expedia.com/insidersselect.

    Bennett’s to offer free coffee

    Beginning Monday, both Bennett’s Fresh Roast locations will offer a free 12-ounce cup of coffee with the purchase of a doughnut on weekdays to mark the beginning of school.

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