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June, 2017 |

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IKEA jobs in Jacksonville | WJAX-TV – Action News Jax

by: Danae Leake, Action News Jax
Updated: Jun 29, 2017 – 11:40 AM


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IKEA has begun hiring for its new location in Jacksonville.

The Swedish furniture company published a list of available jobs on its website.

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The nine specific job titles for the store at Interstate 295 and Gate Parkway include interior design coworker, customer resolutions specialist and graphic communications coworker. The store is expected to employ at least 250 workers.

 The company designs and sells ready-to-assemble furniture, kitchen appliances and home accessories. 


Related: Behind the scenes of the upcoming Jacksonville IKEA store


Some of the job titles require workers to either have an associate’s degree while others require a high school diploma or GED.

IKEA told Action News Jax that the company began recruiting its store leadership team earlier this year. The Jacksonville store is set to open in fall 2017.

Jacksonville’s IKEA will be its 44th store in the U.S. and the 393rd worldwide. The closest IKEA to Jacksonville is in Orlando.

To apply for the available positions, visit the store’s website.

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Ten Thousand Villages opens temporary location

Ten Thousand Villages has opened in Tanger Outlets Hershey but, the store won’t stay around for long. The store opened last month and the store is temporary and expects to close September 15.

The store opened in the 2,700 square foot former location of Bath Body Works between Rue 21 and the Ann Taylor Factory Store. Bath Body Works relocated to the space between Loft Outlet and Carter’s Babies and Kids. 

Ten Thousand Villages sells items from around the world and creates opportunities for artisans in developing countries, according to its website. The store sells a variety of items including jewelry, accessories, kitchen and dining items, handmade baskets, wall decor, items for the home, outdoor items, bath accessories, candles, games, toys, holiday items and stationery.

Tanger Outlets Hershey is open from 9 a.m. – 9 p.m., Monday through Saturday, and 10 a.m. – 7 p.m. Sunday.

Ten Thousand Villages is based in Akron, Lancaster County and has store across the country including a location in Upper Allen Township.

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The Mission’s eye-catching design destinations

The Mission’s eye-catching design destinations



June 30, 2017
Updated: June 30, 2017 1:35pm

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San Francisco’s Mission District has earned its reputation as the city’s creative hub: Residents have found innovative ways to beautify their homes and streets, either by refreshing weathered exteriors with vibrant murals, restoring and repurposing warehouses or transforming blacktops into compact parks and gardens. Now, the neighborhood has the city’s largest collection of shops and studios showcasing handcrafted works, from ceramics to botanicals. This is the place to haunt if you’re looking for the best of Bay Area design.


Heath Ceramics

In the trendy Mission Creek microhood, where most former factories are now condos, Heath Ceramics transformed a 100-year-old commercial laundry building into a feat of 21st century manufacturing and design. Browse the company’s timeless midcentury tile and dinnerware in an airy showroom by Commune Design in Los Angeles, and you’ll catch glimpses of tile production through soaring interior windows. Or wander over to the Boiler Room (a cavernous gallery named for its imposing metal boilers), which features yearlong programming from Tokyo’s famed Playmountain design shop. Eventually, the aromas of fresh-baked bread will lure you into Tartine Manufactory, a buzzworthy cafe and bakery that opened in the building late last year. 2900 18th St., www.heathceramics.com

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Parklet at Samovar Tea Bar

Parklets in San Francisco, which began as a clever experiment to convert metered parking spaces into small-scale models of creative design, have been embraced by the local planning department. The Mission features the city’s largest assortment — check out the rotating public-art concepts outside Luna Rienne Gallery and the shipwrecked hull at Ritual Coffee — with the latest example fronting the sleek Samovar Tea Bar. The cedar structure was designed and constructed by Oldani Art Studio, whose refined millwork can be seen at hot spots like the Progress and Sightglass Coffee. It features metal panels emblazoned with a bold, floral Jet Martinez painting, a visual link to a previous mural by the former Clarion Alley Mural Project director located just steps away. 411 Valencia St., www.samovartea.com/

Acacia

This pristine home-goods shop exudes the earthy, natural lifestyle that owner Lily Chau sought when she fled NYC for the West Coast. Her affinity for Japanese and Scandinavian style is apparent in modular dinnerware from Hasami Porcelain and Iittala’s sleek glassware. There’s plenty of local design, too, including Fellow Products’ copper pour-over kettles and Most Modest’s wooden power strips. The shop shares space with Heliotrope, a natural skin-care line whose organic balms and soaps are also made in San Francisco. 415 Valencia St., www.acaciasf.com

Lila B. Design

The lush, plum tree-lined courtyard adjacent to Stable Cafe — a former mayor’s 19th century carriage house repurposed by architect Malcolm Davis in 2008 — is a happy discovery along an industrial strip. Beyond a charming spot to sip coffee al fresco, it serves as the garden showroom for Baylor Chapman’s botanical design studio. “I was raised on a rural Illinois farm, mile-long driveway and all, so I love bringing greenery to urban spaces,” she says. Chapman, who penned the “Plant Recipe Book” (Artisan), also hosts on-site workshops where participants construct terrariums and centerpieces around an outdoor wood-burning fireplace. 2128 Folsom St., www.lilabdesign.com

Little Paper Planes

Before it occupied a Valencia Street storefront, Little Paper Planes was a wildly successful, pre-Etsy online shop that galvanized a community of independent artists and makers. Owner Kelly Lynn Jones is an enthusiastic advocate for fellow artists, filling her gallery-like space with handmade goods such as jewelry from Mission designer Hikaru Furuhashi and exclusive art prints from monthly featured artists. In April, the shop released print editions of S.F. painter Sofie Ramos’ playful, pop art-inflected work. 855 Valencia St., www.littlepaperplanes.com

Windy Chien

For her fine-art take on macrame, Chien taps a variety of influences: Her Circuit Board wall hangings were inspired by electronic circuitry and Massimo Vignelli’s classic NYC subway map. And last year, armed with a book of old sailing hitches and a vow to learn a new knot each day, she produced 366 elegantly tied pieces (2016 was a leap year) for her mesmerizing Year of Knots installation. “If you’re a guitarist who only knows three chords, you can play the Ramones, but if you want to cover Neil Young, you need to learn more,” she says, referring to the limits of traditional macrame. Her works are featured at the Mission’s Satellite of Love gallery (766 Valencia St.); prospective buyers are invited to arrange studio visits via her site, www.windychien.com

Peace Industry

After discovering felted lamb’s wool rugs, a handmade nomadic tradition that predates weaving, Melina and Dodd Raissnia established a workshop to give the lost craft a stylish reboot. Their dense, tactile rugs, dyed in warm earth tones, resemble large modernist paintings. Remnants get a second life in the form of choobs, felt poufs named after the Farsi word for “log.” The shop owners plan to follow up their recent Heath collaboration with a series featuring local designer Alison Damonte and architecture-design firm Marmol Radziner. 2235 Mission St., www.peaceindustry.com

Aesthetic Union

The rich, retro look of this cozy letterpress and retail shop stems from owner James Tucker’s childhood fascination with the drafting tool-filled work space of his engineer mother. Yet Tucker, who studied printing and design at the Maryland Institute College of Art, is keen on pushing the limits of the 500-year-old craft, using digital technologies to produce modern debossed prints from his three hulking Heidelberg presses. He invites passersby to wander in, browse a micro gallery of previous work and ask questions. “I’ve worked in too many solitary, basement-confined printing shops,” Tucker says. “I really like talking to people.” 555 Alabama St., www.theaestheticunion.com

Garrick Ramirez is a San Francisco writer and photographer. Email: home@sfchronicle.com

Where the pros dine in style

From Michelin-starred restaurants such as Al’s Place and Lazy Bear to the burritos at La Taqueria (ranked the nation’s best by the data geeks at FiveThirtyEight), the Mission is noted for its dynamic food scene. Here are some recommendations on where to refuel.

Catherine Bailey, Heath Ceramics: “The soft serve at Tartine Manufactory is made with buffalo milk, so it’s rich and delicious. The flavors vary but the Askinosie chocolate is what I’m dreaming about at the moment.” 595 Alabama St., www.tartinemanufactory.com

Luigi Oldani, Oldani Art Studio: “The avocado toast at Samovar Tea Bar delivers every time.” 411 Valencia St., www.samovartea.com

Lily Chau, Acacia: “I’m not usually a turkey fan, but the turkey melt at Craftsman and Wolves, made on a crispy, salty focaccia with a tad-sweet apple mostarda, is sandwich perfection.” 746 Valencia St., www.craftsman-wolves.com

More Interior design

Baylor Chapman, Lila B. Design: “There’s a reason the soups at Stable Cafe sell out by 1:15 p.m.: They’re delicious! Also, the farm harvested hard-boiled eggs are straight from the owner’s Petaluma farm.” 2128 Folsom St., www.stablecafe.com

Kelly Lynn Jones, Little Paper Planes: “Mission Cheese is my happy-hour go-to, mainly because I love cheese with my beer. Ask for the Monger’s Choice and they’ll create a beautiful sampler of cheeses!” 736 Valencia St., www.missioncheese.net

Windy Chien: “The food at the Morris is incredible, but what I equally love are the ceramic serving pieces by Julia Lemke at Totem and Beth Katz at Mt. Washington Pottery that transport the dining experience to another level.” 2501 Mariposa St., www.themorris-sf.com

Dodd Melina Raissnia, Peace Industry: “Lolinda is our regular post-work spot for ceviche and the best beef empanadas.” 2518 Mission St., www.lolindasf.com

James Tucker, Aesthetic Union: “Farmhouse Kitchen is a great place to hang out after a long day. They have a rice wine-spiked punch called the Kickboxing Bowl that’s perfect to share with friends.” 710 Florida St., www.farmhousesf.com

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KitchenAid mixer and other amazing deals from Amazon

Every day, Amazon highlights the best deals and limited-time sales on their site, but with endless pages of products, no one has time to scroll through them all. To save you the headache, we’ve done the hard work for you and rounded up the day’s best finds from Amazon. From best-selling gadgets to household items, take advantage of these stellar deals before it’s too late!

Shop Amazon daily deals

Made from recycled rubber, add a welcoming addition to your home with this chic outdoor floor mat.

Save 73% today!

This packing cube set includes three travel cubes, three pouches, and one shoe bag.

Save 60% today!

This sleek feature hamper features two compartments make it easy to sort your laundry!

Save 29% today!

Head to the beach in style with this durable and water resistant canvas beach bag.

Save 33% today!

This KitchenAid mixer features 15 optional attachments so you can create all of your favorite meals!

Save 53% today!

Product prices are subject to change and reflect the date the article was published.

RELATED: Everything we’re buying this summer from Amazon

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Channeling the funky ’50s in updating a Virginia house

Amissville, Virginia — The pink stucco house was a time capsule from the 1950s, with its original metal kitchen cabinets, aluminum bathroom tiles, wood paneling and parquet floors. But it was in the last place you’d expect to find it: on a woodsy 25-acre lot along the Rappahannock River nestled in Virginia’s Hunt Country.

Siobhan and Sander Mueller, a suburban Washington couple looking for a weekend getaway, were immediately hooked when they saw the listing in 2013, even though the property was a little rundown.

“We thought, ‘What could a house like this house be doing in the woods outside of Warrenton?’ ” Siobhan says. “This house wants to be in Palm Springs.” They realized the house would need some careful restoration and a small addition by an architect to accommodate their family. They were prepared to pay for that, but to stay on budget, they decided to take on the decorating themselves.

Using primarily online-shopping sites and blogs and sharing selections on Pinterest, the couple found the tools to create the mid-century vibe they wanted.

Sander, 50, chief strategy officer at Anybill, which provides accounts payable and payment services to businesses, and Siobhan, 46, a senior vice president at Widmeyer Communications, plunged into the project with a sense of adventure; the quirky property was so different from their traditional Colonial home. Their mission became to be good stewards of its unusual design legacy. They hired architect Dwight McNeill of McNeill Baker Design Associates.

The original owner, an artist and composer who traveled much of the year and whom the Muellers have come to refer to as Uncle Buddy, had this house custom-built. It has an open floor plan, the centerpiece a 40-by-28-foot great room paneled in red-gum plywood with 12-foot ceilings. The focal point is a large fireplace featuring exotic Chinese Chippendale motifs and trimmed with hand-carved dogwood blossoms. The wacky overscale blossoms also appear as a surround for sliding doors.

McNeill and the Muellers made contact with one of Uncle Buddy’s relatives who still lived in the area. They delighted in seeing photographs of how the house was furnished in the 1950s and 1960s. Although the look is mid-century, Warrenton architect Washington Reed, who designed the home with lots of input from Uncle Buddy, had been part of the restoration team at Colonial Williamsburg. This might explain the serpentine brick garden walls and Colonial-style brick shed.

The house had only two bedrooms, and the Muellers wanted a couple more; they have two children, Beck, 12, and Lulu, 9. They also needed a larger kitchen and had to fix burst pipes and buckling floors and replace the septic system.

Siobhan and Sander sourced most things from the Internet and soaked up inspiration from blogs such as Retro Renovation (retrorenovation.com) and Remodelista (remodelista.com). They found less expensive versions of classic mid-century-style dining chairs in molded plastic and leather and plywood loungers. They played with floor plans and picked out Ikea kitchen fittings. Siobhan sought out affordable touches: On HM Home (hm.com), she found cool accessories under $10, such as tea-light holders and vases.

Although their Colonial is stuffed to the brim with the things a family of four accumulates, here in the country they appreciated the spareness of the space and didn’t want to overfurnish it. Here’s the Muellers’ take, edited from conversations and emails, on how the house came together.

Q: How did you approach the furnishings?

Siobhan: I am all about the look for less. You can fall in love with everything at Mitchell Gold and Bob Williams, but unless money is no object, you get two chairs from them and then surround them with cheaper things you find online. Buying furniture gets really expensive really fast.

Q: This house is a bit of a mix of mid-century modern decorating elements. How did you decide which direction to go?

Siobhan: Everyone loves mid-century modern, but true mid-century modern is a little bland. It’s woody, tweedy and masculine. Uncle Buddy seems to have been influenced by Dorothy Draper [a prolific designer in the 1930s and 1940s, famous for her use of bright colors, bold prints and lacquered panel doors]. We wanted to connect to the hand-carved pagoda frame and dogwood blossoms. So we added a few unexpected things, such as a Kelly-green lacquered chest and some pillows with palm tree fabric, plus a few bursts of orange accessories.

Q: The house already had such a strong design identity. What attracted you to that particular house?

Sander: We had been looking in the area for several years. I didn’t want the type of weekend house with deer heads on the walls and pictures of fox hunts. We were intrigued by the history of the house and the design, and the more we got into it, you could feel the character of the man who lived there. We felt a connection to it.

Q: How did you two collaborate on so many decisions?

Sander: We would sit in bed with our laptops open and go through stuff. She would show me something, and I would say, “I hate it.” I would show her something, and she would say, “Maybe.” Anyway, in the end, we compromised pretty well. I love to cook so I picked out the appliances, but she laid out the kitchen.

Q: You replaced the small galley kitchen by expanding it into what was a porch area using Ikea components. How did that work?

Siobhan: I used the online Ikea tool, and it’s fairly intuitive. The goal was to have multiple work and prep areas, with Sander having his own cooking area. During the holidays, when the house is filled with family, we magnet recipes to the stainless-steel shelves. It’s like working the line in a diner.

Q: Did you install the kitchen yourselves?

Siobhan: No, the thought of install was terrifying. We called Expert Design Kitchen Cabinets Installation. They were awesome, and the counsel they gave me on the design was invaluable. There are little tricks, such as ordering extra filler panels to ensure spacing, extra parts needed to do a drawer microwave, pieces they include but you don’t actually need. It was the kind of inside advice that saves you money and saves them hassle.

Q: How did you deal with furnishing the great room?

Sander: It was a challenge to fill that space. We started out simply. Siobhan knew the center rug she wanted, a Moroccan shag. She said, “Let’s get the two longest couches possible and anchor the thing and build around it.” The dining room table was a splurge. I didn’t want a wood table, so I found a metal one from Italy. It can seat 12 people for dinner.

Siobhan: Uncle Buddy loved to entertain, and anybody who ever lives in a house leaves some of themselves there. We feel his spirit, and we have a picture of him on the bookcase, plus a photo of the family we bought the house from. We find these to be a real connection to the past, which is something important to us about this house. We love to cook and have people over, and our kids love having puppet shows here and game nights. Uncle Buddy often wore a red silk kimono when he hosted parties. Last year, his niece gave the kimono to us.

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Bed Bath & Beyond opens new Middletown store

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CLOSEWHAT’S GOING THERE IN MONMOUTH AND OCEAN?Bed Bath Beyond opens a new store in Middletown | 1:00

Bed Bath Beyond’s new store in Middletown is the company’s latest with many updated features.
DAVID P. WILLIS

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CLOSEWHAT’S GOING THERE IN MONMOUTH AND OCEAN?Wawa coming to South Toms River | 0:52

Wawa is building a new store with fuel pumps on Dover Road in South Toms River.
DAVID P. WILLIS

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CLOSEWHAT’S GOING THERE IN MONMOUTH AND OCEAN?Jersey Mike’s coming to Neptune | 1:00

Jersey Mike’s is opening a sub shop on June 30 on Route 71 in Neptune.
DAVID P. WILLIS

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CLOSEWHAT’S GOING THERE IN MONMOUTH AND OCEAN?Livoti’s Old World Market to open in Middletown | 0:52

Livoti’s Old World Market opens in Middletown, it’s third store. Here’s some of what customers can expect.
DAVID P. WILLIS | WOCHIT

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CLOSEWHAT’S GOING THERE IN MONMOUTH AND OCEAN?Hobby Lobby comes to Holmdel | 0:36

Hobby Lobby is renovating a store in Holmdel, it’s third location at the Jersey Shore. Video by David P. Willis
Wochit | David P. Willis

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CLOSEWHAT’S GOING THERE IN MONMOUTH AND OCEAN?AutoZone coming to Wall | 0:51

An AutoZone store is under construction on Route 35 in Wall. Video by David P. Willis
Wochit | David P. Willis

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CLOSEWHAT’S GOING THERE IN MONMOUTH AND OCEAN?Michaels coming to Brick Plaza | 0:59

Michaels Stores will move into part of the former AP building at Brick Plaza. Video by David P. Willis
Wochit | David P. Willis

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CLOSEWHAT’S GOING THERE IN MONMOUTH AND OCEAN?Starbucks coming to Aberdeen | 0:31

Starbucks is opening a cafe on Route 34 in Aberdeen. Video by David P. Willis
Wochit

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CLOSEWHAT’S GOING THERE IN MONMOUTH AND OCEAN?Walmart renovations | 0:50

Walmart will begin renovating its store in Neptune in August and recently finished a project in Stafford. Here’s what you’ll see. Video by David P. Willis
Wochit

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CLOSEWHAT’S GOING THERE IN MONMOUTH AND OCEAN?New home for Northern Ocean Habitat for Humanity ReStore | 0:55

Northern Ocean Habitat for Humanity ReStore will move into the former Bob Kislin’s Outdoor Sports store in August. Video by David P. Willis
Wochit

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CLOSEWHAT’S GOING THERE IN MONMOUTH AND OCEAN?Greenleaf at Howell is growing | 0:52

LA Fitness plans to open a fitness center at Greenleaf at Howell. Video by David P. Willis
Wochit

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CLOSEWHAT’S GOING THERE IN MONMOUTH AND OCEAN?Wall Promenade is coming | 0:45

Demolition of the old Levitz store on Route 35 in Wall and construction of Wall Promenade, a new shopping center, has begun.
Wochit

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CLOSEWHAT’S GOING THERE IN MONMOUTH AND OCEAN?McDonald’s of Aberdeen changing | 0:25

A new McDonald’s is rising on Route 35. In this video supplied by McDonald’s of Aberdeen, workers start pouring the foundation.
Wochit

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CLOSEWHAT’S GOING THERE IN MONMOUTH AND OCEAN?Sickles coming to Anderson building in Red Bank | 0:53

A Sickles market will soon find a home in Red Bank’s old Anderson building.
Wochit

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CLOSEWHAT’S GOING THERE IN MONMOUTH AND OCEAN?Renovations underway at McLoone’s restaurants in Asbury Park | 0:50

Big changes are coming to McLoone’s Asbury Grille and Tim McLoone’s Supper Club in Asbury Park. Video by David P. Willis
David P. Willis

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CLOSEWHAT’S GOING THERE IN MONMOUTH AND OCEAN?Big changes for Seaview Square Shopping Center | 0:51

Changes are happening again at Seaview Square Shopping Center. Here’s a bit of history about Ocean Township’s largest shopping center. Staff Video by David P. Willis
Wochit | David P. Willis

  • Bed Bath  Beyond opens a new store in Middletown
  • Wawa coming to South Toms River
  • Jersey Mike's coming to Neptune
  • Livoti's Old World Market to open in Middletown
  • Hobby Lobby comes to Holmdel
  • AutoZone coming to Wall
  • Michaels coming to Brick Plaza
  • Starbucks coming to Aberdeen
  • Walmart renovations
  • New home for Northern Ocean Habitat for Humanity ReStore
  • Greenleaf at Howell is growing
  • Wall Promenade is coming
  • McDonald's of Aberdeen changing
  • Sickles coming to Anderson building in Red Bank
  • Renovations underway at McLoone's restaurants in Asbury Park
  • Big changes for Seaview Square Shopping Center

MIDDLETOWN – Bed Bath Beyond has opened its new Middletown store on Route 35, a new anchor store at what is now the Marketplace at Middletown shopping center.

The domestic and home furnishing store recently closed its store at Harmony Road and Route 35 in Middletown after its lease expired to move further south on the highway.

The larger 35,000-square-foot store has Bed Bath Beyond’s latest look with several new specialty departments.

More: Livoti’s opening 3rd food market in Middletown

More: Can T.J. Maxx save the Shore’s aging strip centers?

It includes Face Values Health and Beauty, which has items typically found at Harmons Face Values stores.

There’s also a new beverage shop featuring coffee makers and coffees that customers can try before they buy. A seating area with tables and chairs is nearby.

A new interactive bedding sales area showcases an assortment of products available online that customers can feel and see in the store.

Other touches include new fixtures, flooring and lighting designs. The store also was designed to offer a high level of customer service, including in-store experts and more differentiated services and solutions, the company said.

The store also sells bed linens, bath accessories, window treatments, framed art, cookware, dinnerware and glassware, lifestyle accessories, closet and storage items and baby items, among other merchandise.

As part of the opening, the store is holding a ribbon cutting on Saturday at 9 a.m. with Mayor Gerald P. Scharfenberger.

As for its old store, Bed Bath Beyond said it is not replacing the tenant with another one of it retail stores. Posts on social media have included speculation about Christmas Tree Shops.


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KitchenAid Artisan Toaster 5KMT2204 review

What is the KitchenAid Artisan Toaster?

The KitchenAid Artisan Toaster is a striking-looking two-slot toaster with a bold, curvaceous design that’s available in a range of bright colours. It’s also very expensive.

Before testing, I feared this toaster would be style over substance, but in fact you get both. Your money buys solid build quality and impressive performance as well as looks. It’s hard to justify spending this much on a toaster… but it’s tempting nonetheless.

Related: Best stand mixers

KitchenAid Artisan Toaster – Design and features

The KitchenAid looks stunning: this curvaceous toaster really will turn heads. I tested it in a glossy empire red, reminiscent of a London bus. It’s available in seven other colours: onyx black, almond cream, candy apple, frosted pearl, raspberry ice and cast iron black.

It’s solidly built, very heavy and takes up a lot of space for a two-slot toaster.

Controls are on one end, so it’s ideally placed with those facing you, but you could turn it sideways on. The power cable is an outstanding 145cm long from the back and there’s cable management underneath to store any excess.

There’s a slider to select browning level, from 1 to 7 and anywhere in between, then four buttons: bagel, defrost, sandwich and toast/cancel. There is no lever to start or finish toasting – you press this button and the bread is mechanically lowered or lifted.

It comes with a sandwich cage and an instruction manual bigger than the one you’d get with most cars. Thankfully it’s in 17 languages, so there are only 16 pages to digest in English.

Related: Best toasters

KitchenAid Artisan Toaster – What’s it like to use?

It’s not just the KitchenAid’s looks that will turn heads, the features will wow too. For example, put bread in the slots and the toaster automatically senses them, lowers them and starts toasting. This worked just fine for me, but if your toastables are so light that this doesn’t trigger you can hit the toast/cancel button.

When your toast is done, the KitchenAid lifts it up in the slot… but if it’s not removed within 45 seconds it automatically lowers and goes on a keep warm cycle for 3 minutes.

So far, so many bragging rights, but what about the results? I toasted one slice of white bread vertically and one horizontally to test evenness. It beeps at the start and finish, sounds like an elevator reaching its desired floor. Which seems fitting, as the bread is lifted up and down.

The toast emerged after just 1 minute 40 seconds, which is very quick, and browning was perfect and impressively even, the best on test. The top of the vertical slice had some stripes on it, but it was still browned perfectly, all the way to the top.

Its 3cm side slots (narrowing to 1cm when clamping toast) held crumpets well. Again toasting was even and the keep-warm function was much appreciated. With no lever, there’s no high lift, though, which means you can only just reach your hot crumpet. And inspecting toast means pressing cancel then waiting a few seconds for the motorised lift. This is an automated toaster that’s designed for the time-poor but it’s not for the impatient.

Related: Best BBQ

Bagels were cooked nicely on one side, with slightly uneven browning but better than most. And sandwiches were delicious and easy to handle in the sandwich cage. At 1 minute 40 seconds bread seemed a little underdone and browning was more towards the bottom. But it tasted great: melt-in-the-mouth cheese, lots of soft crumb but crispy on the outside. Next time I’d turn up the browning slightly.

The sides of the toaster get warm but certainly not hot enough to burn. And its crumb tray is accessed from the right-hand side and is sturdy but shallow, it won’t hold much.

Related: Best fans

Should I buy the KitchenAid Artisan Toaster?

If money’s no object then buy this. It’s beautiful, performance is impressive and the motorised lift and keep-warm function make it good for the time-poor.

But it costs a lot and only has two slots. There is a four-slot Artisan toaster but it’s less beautiful and even pricier. For a great toaster at half the price, consider the Dualit 4 Slot Lite or the Hotpoint TT 44E UP0. If you’re on a budget, consider the Morphy Richards Rose Gold Toaster. Keen on a two-slice toaster? Check out the Sage A Bit More 2 Slice.

Verdict

Stunning looking, superb performance, but very pricey – one for the wedding list?

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