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August 1, 2017 |

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Bon-Ton Stores Seek Locally-Sourced and Themed Products from Local Makers, Artisans & Entrepreneurs

MILWAUKEE, Aug. 1, 2017 /PRNewswire/ – The Bon-Ton Stores, Inc. (NASDAQ: BONT), which operates Bon-Ton, Bergner’s, Boston Store, Carson’s, Elder-Beerman, Herberger’s and Younkers stores, announced today that it seeks locally-sourced and themed products from local artists and designers, makers, artisans, and entrepreneurs for its growing “Close to Home” program. The retailer once again invites vendors with established businesses and galleries interested in having their products sold in “Close to Home” shops to apply online now through August 31 during Bon-Ton’s second Online Sourcing Fair.

Milwaukee, WI Close to Home shop

Available in-store and online, “Close to Home” shops feature locally-sourced and themed products many of which are hand-crafted or upcycled. Bon-Ton launched its first Online Sourcing Fair earlier this year as part of an ongoing effort to provide shoppers with a broader selection of local products by developing more relationships with area makers in communities they serve. During the first Online Sourcing Fair, more than 1,250 artists, designers, makers, artisans and entrepreneurs submitted applications in more than a dozen product categories with jewelry, artwork, home décor, kitchen and bar, apparel, and accessories topping the list.

“We were thrilled by the number of submissions and the level of creativity and quality we found in our first Online Sourcing Fair and are very excited to develop more partnerships with makers,” said Chad Stauffer, Executive Vice President, Chief Merchandising Officer for The Bon-Ton Stores, Inc. “Our ‘Close to Home’ shops allow local artisans to reach a much wider marketplace and offer our customers the true local flavor and personalized offerings they want from their hometown shopping destination.”

To date, the “Close to Home” initiative has provided more than 325 small businesses with the opportunity to sell products in a major department store. “Close to Home” is part of Bon-Ton’s broader commitment to support the communities where its stores are located. Since opening in 45 stores in fall 2016, Bon-Ton has more than tripled the number of “Close to Home” shops to 148 and plans to open an additional 40 in-store shops in early fall.

“Close to Home” shops offer new items frequently and seasonally to provide shoppers with a fun, fresh and unique product selection. Shoppers will find custom-designed and locally themed products and one-of-a-kind creations such as artwork, jewelry, home deÌ�cor, kitchen and barware, ceramics, bath body products and other items crafted by local artists.

The current Online Sourcing Fair is open through August 31, 2017 at closetohome.bonton.com. Interested applicants must reside in one of Bon-Ton’s 25 states to apply for this exclusive opportunity.

About The Bon-Ton Stores, Inc.
The Bon-Ton Stores, Inc., with corporate headquarters in York, Pennsylvania and Milwaukee, Wisconsin, operates 261 stores, which includes 9 furniture galleries and four clearance centers, in 25 states in the Northeast, Midwest and upper Great Plains under the Bon-Ton, Bergner’s, Boston Store, Carson’s, Elder-Beerman, Herberger’s and Younkers nameplates. The stores offer a broad assortment of national and private brand fashion apparel and accessories for women, men and children, as well as cosmetics and home furnishings. The Bon-Ton Stores, Inc. is an active and positive participant in the communities it serves. For further information, please visit thebontonstoresinc.com or the company’s web site at bonton.com. Join the conversation and be inspired by following Bon-Ton on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and Pinterest.

 

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SOURCE The Bon-Ton Stores, Inc.

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MSU’s Adkerson receives national PGA honor

Contact: James Carskadon

STARKVILLE, Miss.—Jeff Adkerson, director of Mississippi State’s PGA Golf Management program, is the 2017 recipient of the Professional Golfers’ Association National Horton Smith Award. The honor recognizes golf professionals for outstanding and continuing contributions to professional education.

Adkerson will be recognized during an awards ceremony in conjunction with the 101st PGA of America Annual Meeting this November. The two-time MSU alumnus has received the Gulf States PGA’s Horton Smith Award four times.

“It is a tremendous honor to be recognized by the PGA of America as the National Horton Smith Award recipient,” Adkerson said. “Supporting PGA Professionals and those aspiring to become PGA members through education only grows our profession and the game of golf. Professionally, there is no greater reward than seeing our students achieve the goals they have established in their careers. To think I may have played a small part in their development and growth is a true honor.”

Earlier this year, Adkerson became one of approximately 350 people since 1969 to earn the PGA’s Master Professional in Golf Operations distinction, given to PGA Professionals that demonstrate the highest degree of excellence. Adkerson joined the MSU College of Business’ PGA Golf Management program in 2003 and became the program’s director in 2007. He currently serves as president of the Gulf States PGA and was named Mississippi Golf Professional of the Year in 2009 and 2011.

MSU’s PGA Golf Management program, housed in the university’s College of Business, is the second oldest program sanctioned by the PGA in the country and boasts 100 percent job placement among its graduates. Adkerson is the second graduate of MSU’s PGA Golf Management program to receive a national PGA award. Alumnus Rod Perry was named PGA Professional Player of the Year in 2012 and 2013. For more on MSU’s PGA Golf Management program, visit www.msupgm.com.

The PGA of America is the world’s largest sports organization, comprised of 28,000 men and women golf professionals who are the recognized experts in teaching and growing the game. Founded in 1916, the PGA of America has enhanced its leadership position by conducting premier spectator events – PGA Championship, Ryder Cup, Senior PGA Championship presented by KitchenAid and KPMG Women’s PGA Championship – as well as significant philanthropic outreach initiatives and award-winning golf promotions.

MSU is Mississippi’s leading university, available online at www.msstate.edu.

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This Stunning High-Rise Home is an Urban Oasis

“I don’t live in a high-rise, but I have a fondness for them,” says interior designer Vaughn Connerty. “The views remind me of growing up on the Gulf and seeing endless sky; I love the feeling of endlessness there.” The Atlanta-based designer recently worked on this high-rise beauty in Buckhead’s Terminus building, with views looking down iconic Peachtree Road towards Midtown.

A sofa by Hickory Chair and end tables from Mrs. Howard are classic styles that distinguish this high-rise living room but don’t distract from the Buckhead view.

An eye-catching painting by internationally known artist Jamali (his collectors include Oprah) adds a burst of energy to the living room.

High-rise home

Side lamps made of glass allow natural light to radiate the room.

Vaughn’s clients use the condo as a second home to visit family in Atlanta, as well as enjoy city life. “Most of my clients with homes in buildings are there for the convenience, amenities and the view,” she says. “I love designing condos because of the clean architectural lines, but I also appreciate the challenge of making enjoyable multipurpose spaces.” Comfort and style are paramount for a high-rise, much like with any home, she says. But because the spaces can be more compact, it’s important to choose beautiful, functional pieces that are complementary in color and form from one room to another.

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Since condos are all about the view, Vaughn often starts with the window treatments. “I typically like to frame the windows with curtains that enhance the view and accentuate the setting,” she says. “This particular condo has several unusually set different windows, so the best solution for maximizing the view and unifying the space was to install recessed motorized shades for light control and privacy.”

One view of the dining area overlooks an accent wall in the living room. The horizontal lines of an antique Art Deco cabinet fill the recessed space. The oval-shaped dining table is from Julian Chichester.

“The master bedroom was inspired by beautiful Pratesi linens,” says interior designer Vaughn Connerty. “We created a pale periwinkle envelope with soft ivory furnishings that are an extension of the sky on a beautiful evening.”

Embroidered pillows add texture and pattern to the peaceful master bedroom.

This project entailed a quick turnaround, and because it was new, only required a little paint, some lighting changes and a few cosmetic kitchen upgrades, recalls the designer. The furniture and accessories were purchased off the floor at Mrs. Howard and Max and Company, as well as other companies that offered quick turnaround on custom work. “The living room furnishings were kept neutral — in durable materials with tone and texture,” says Vaughn. “That allowed the view and artwork — a favorite piece by Jamali — to shine.” Because space is at a premium, the designer needed to mount the television directly on the wall, but she kept the look high-style by painting the wall Farrow and Ball “Black Blue.” “That color let the TV blend in with the space behind it and also offered a magnified backdrop for an amazing Art Deco cabinet found on a trip to New York,” says Vaughn. The adjacent dining area is in a high-traffic space, so she chose an oval dining table that had ample seating for entertaining, while still allowing enough room for moving around.

The guest bedroom was created as a gender-neutral space where family and friends can stay in comfort, says the designer. The bed is from Mitchell Gold + Bob Williams.

An office area is adjacent to the kitchen. “I chose this adjustable height metal desk to play off the stainless kitchen appliances,” says Vaughn. “The photographs are my client’s personal photography and help to bring a little bit of the outdoors to this windowless space.” The desk is from Mrs. Howard and the chair is Design Within Reach.

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Vaughn’s tips on high-rise decorating are actually good advice for any space: It’s important to recognize the architectural envelope of the space and keep the design consistent to that voice. In spaces like this, where most things are visible from almost everywhere, use quality pieces that are loved. Treat the windows; they are often the reason you are living in a building, so frame your views! Maximize storage with large case goods and custom built-ins … contain the clutter. And a biggie for Vaughn: Invest in artwork. “A large piece of art serves as a focal point in any space,” she says. “It is one of the truest reflections of a person.”

Interior designer Vaughn Connerty got her start with renowned decorator and store owner Phoebe Howard. “I moved to Atlanta out of high school to attend Emory and found myself wondering what I would do as a career,” she says. “I’ve always been a pragmatic creative. Once I found interior design, I enrolled in some classes at The Art Institute and never looked back.”

Special thanks to Chris Little Photography for the gorgeous interior photos. And thanks to Heidi Geldhauser for the portrait of Vaughn.

**********

Be inspired by more Southern interiors — check out our “Homes” section!

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This Stunning High-Rise Home is an Urban Oasis

“I don’t live in a high-rise, but I have a fondness for them,” says interior designer Vaughn Connerty. “The views remind me of growing up on the Gulf and seeing endless sky; I love the feeling of endlessness there.” The Atlanta-based designer recently worked on this high-rise beauty in Buckhead’s Terminus building, with views looking down iconic Peachtree Road towards Midtown.

A sofa by Hickory Chair and end tables from Mrs. Howard are classic styles that distinguish this high-rise living room but don’t distract from the Buckhead view.

An eye-catching painting by internationally known artist Jamali (his collectors include Oprah) adds a burst of energy to the living room.

High-rise home

Side lamps made of glass allow natural light to radiate the room.

Vaughn’s clients use the condo as a second home to visit family in Atlanta, as well as enjoy city life. “Most of my clients with homes in buildings are there for the convenience, amenities and the view,” she says. “I love designing condos because of the clean architectural lines, but I also appreciate the challenge of making enjoyable multipurpose spaces.” Comfort and style are paramount for a high-rise, much like with any home, she says. But because the spaces can be more compact, it’s important to choose beautiful, functional pieces that are complementary in color and form from one room to another.

We love our sponsors!

Since condos are all about the view, Vaughn often starts with the window treatments. “I typically like to frame the windows with curtains that enhance the view and accentuate the setting,” she says. “This particular condo has several unusually set different windows, so the best solution for maximizing the view and unifying the space was to install recessed motorized shades for light control and privacy.”

One view of the dining area overlooks an accent wall in the living room. The horizontal lines of an antique Art Deco cabinet fill the recessed space. The oval-shaped dining table is from Julian Chichester.

“The master bedroom was inspired by beautiful Pratesi linens,” says interior designer Vaughn Connerty. “We created a pale periwinkle envelope with soft ivory furnishings that are an extension of the sky on a beautiful evening.”

Embroidered pillows add texture and pattern to the peaceful master bedroom.

This project entailed a quick turnaround, and because it was new, only required a little paint, some lighting changes and a few cosmetic kitchen upgrades, recalls the designer. The furniture and accessories were purchased off the floor at Mrs. Howard and Max and Company, as well as other companies that offered quick turnaround on custom work. “The living room furnishings were kept neutral — in durable materials with tone and texture,” says Vaughn. “That allowed the view and artwork — a favorite piece by Jamali — to shine.” Because space is at a premium, the designer needed to mount the television directly on the wall, but she kept the look high-style by painting the wall Farrow and Ball “Black Blue.” “That color let the TV blend in with the space behind it and also offered a magnified backdrop for an amazing Art Deco cabinet found on a trip to New York,” says Vaughn. The adjacent dining area is in a high-traffic space, so she chose an oval dining table that had ample seating for entertaining, while still allowing enough room for moving around.

The guest bedroom was created as a gender-neutral space where family and friends can stay in comfort, says the designer. The bed is from Mitchell Gold + Bob Williams.

An office area is adjacent to the kitchen. “I chose this adjustable height metal desk to play off the stainless kitchen appliances,” says Vaughn. “The photographs are my client’s personal photography and help to bring a little bit of the outdoors to this windowless space.” The desk is from Mrs. Howard and the chair is Design Within Reach.

We love our sponsors!

Vaughn’s tips on high-rise decorating are actually good advice for any space: It’s important to recognize the architectural envelope of the space and keep the design consistent to that voice. In spaces like this, where most things are visible from almost everywhere, use quality pieces that are loved. Treat the windows; they are often the reason you are living in a building, so frame your views! Maximize storage with large case goods and custom built-ins … contain the clutter. And a biggie for Vaughn: Invest in artwork. “A large piece of art serves as a focal point in any space,” she says. “It is one of the truest reflections of a person.”

Interior designer Vaughn Connerty got her start with renowned decorator and store owner Phoebe Howard. “I moved to Atlanta out of high school to attend Emory and found myself wondering what I would do as a career,” she says. “I’ve always been a pragmatic creative. Once I found interior design, I enrolled in some classes at The Art Institute and never looked back.”

Special thanks to Chris Little Photography for the gorgeous interior photos. And thanks to Heidi Geldhauser for the portrait of Vaughn.

**********

Be inspired by more Southern interiors — check out our “Homes” section!

Category: Accessories  Tags: ,  Comments off

5 ways to simplify your life

Chances are, your life is messy.

One out of 10 Americans rent a storage unit, according to the Self Storage Association, and 25 percent of people with two-car garages don’t even have room to park inside them.

You don’t have to go to extremes a la Marie Kondo and her “The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up.” There are ways to simplify your home and your mind without getting rid of everything that doesn’t provide extreme joy.

“When you simplify and just have the things around you that you like and need, you can stay focused,” said Marcia Ramsland, a San Diego-based organizing coach for business and for life. “Your mind stays focused, and you get a lot more done in a shorter amount of time.”

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5 ways to simplify your life

Chances are, your life is messy.

One out of 10 Americans rent a storage unit, according to the Self Storage Association, and 25 percent of people with two-car garages don’t even have room to park inside them.

You don’t have to go to extremes a la Marie Kondo and her “The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up.” There are ways to simplify your home and your mind without getting rid of everything that doesn’t provide extreme joy.

“When you simplify and just have the things around you that you like and need, you can stay focused,” said Marcia Ramsland, a San Diego-based organizing coach for business and for life. “Your mind stays focused, and you get a lot more done in a shorter amount of time.”

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College Park artist builds conversation, community through dinnerware

LeAnn Siefferman uses her art to open up dinner conversations and participants’ minds.

Good food, good art and good conversation — these are the ingredients for an evening hosted by The Dinner Party Project, an Orlando-based company known for its unique take on the dinner party. This summer, The Dinner Party Project is collaborating with College Park artist LeAnn Siefferman for a series called Making Conversations.

“The Making Conversations series is a chance for people to gather and chat about some more in-depth, possibly sensitive subjects in a safe space with great moderation,” said Dana Marie Roquemore, founder and owner of the Dinner Party Project.

The series of dinners, which started in June, is aimed at creating meaningful, intentional conversations among the 12 strangers who attend. Each of the six dinners has a different topic.

“I make the dinnerware that reflects the topics,” Siefferman said. “The dinnerware’s designed and illustrated to provoke conversation on different issues.”

Siefferman started the Making Conversation series back in January, when she took a class on religion, peace, art and social change. A painter and ceramist by trade, she started creating plates with a theme of religious tolerance and religious literacy. Then she realized that the plates could actually be put to use, and the collaboration was born. Roquemore and the Dinner Party Project supply the food, the venue and the dinner party experience; Siefferman provides the plates and the conversation ideas.

“There’s something really special about being able to make the plates and the bowls that we’re eating out of,” Siefferman said. “They have a story already. It’s just a human connection.”

Those human connections are what Siefferman hopes to foster through the series. She wants to encourage people to talk to each other, learn about opinions that might contrast their own, and learn how to talk to people they disagree with.

“We need to start learning how to talk to one another,” she said. “We’ve got to learn to find this comfort in complexity. Everybody is so layered. You can’t ever truly know somebody, I don’t think. It’s a process; it’s not a destination.”

Each dinner has two moderators: one representative from Valencia’s Peace and Justice Institute who keeps the conversation moving forward and one content expert who can give insight into the topic. Siefferman stressed that she is not an expert in any of the topics the dinners cover — the project is a learning experience for her as well.

“I am doing all this so I can learn too,” she said. “I’m still in a permanent state of learning and trying to learn about other people. I have a lot of misconceptions I learn about every day. So this is a personal project for me too, to dispel my own misconceptions and assumptions about things.”

Ultimately, the goal of the series is that those who attend gain the same thing: a broadened worldview and a healthy way to deal with learning about one’s own shortcomings.

“The more connected we are the better it is, and the more diverse we are the better it is,” Roquemore said. “We’re always hoping more people will join us around the dinner table and share a meal with thinkers.”

To learn about the topics covered in Making Conversations or to sign up for a dinner, visit thedinnerpartyproject.co/making-conversations.

 

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