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August 7, 2017 |

Archive for » August 7th, 2017«

Target is selling fun and whimsical dinnerware for kids — and most of it costs under $20

The Insider Picks team writes about stuff we think you’ll like. Business Insider has affiliate partnerships so we may get a share of the revenue from your purchase.



Cheeky Kids Instagram

If you’ve ever visited the party supply and tableware aisles in a grocery store only to walk away empty-handed and disappointed, Cheeky CEO and cofounder PJ Brice understands exactly what you’re going through. In 2014, Brice decided to take this gap in fashionable tableware and turn a simple paper plate into so much more.

The mission of lifestyle brand Cheeky is “to make mealtime matter.” The company makes disposable and porcelain tableware, like plates, napkins, cups, dinnerware sets, and utensils, for kids and families.

Cheeky isn’t only trying to bring families back to the dinner table with its colorful and eye-catching dinnerware designs, but it’s also making mealtime a reality for millions of people around the country. For every Cheeky item purchased, the company gives one meal to someone in need through the organizations Feeding America and No Kid Hungry. Since launching in November 2014, Cheeky has helped provide over 14 million meals.

With its mission-driven focus and whimsical products, Cheeky is a brand that parents can’t help but get behind.

We rounded up some of its best baby, kids, and family products below — all under $20. See why kids and parents alike love Cheeky, then shop the full line of products at Target.

Category: Dinnerware  Tags: ,  Comments off

Target is selling fun and whimsical dinnerware for kids — and most of it costs under $20

The Insider Picks team writes about stuff we think you’ll like. Business Insider has affiliate partnerships so we may get a share of the revenue from your purchase.



Cheeky Kids Instagram

If you’ve ever visited the party supply and tableware aisles in a grocery store only to walk away empty-handed and disappointed, Cheeky CEO and cofounder PJ Brice understands exactly what you’re going through. In 2014, Brice decided to take this gap in fashionable tableware and turn a simple paper plate into so much more.

The mission of lifestyle brand Cheeky is “to make mealtime matter.” The company makes disposable and porcelain tableware, like plates, napkins, cups, dinnerware sets, and utensils, for kids and families.

Cheeky isn’t only trying to bring families back to the dinner table with its colorful and eye-catching dinnerware designs, but it’s also making mealtime a reality for millions of people around the country. For every Cheeky item purchased, the company gives one meal to someone in need through the organizations Feeding America and No Kid Hungry. Since launching in November 2014, Cheeky has helped provide over 14 million meals.

With its mission-driven focus and whimsical products, Cheeky is a brand that parents can’t help but get behind.

We rounded up some of its best baby, kids, and family products below — all under $20. See why kids and parents alike love Cheeky, then shop the full line of products at Target.

Category: Dinnerware  Tags: ,  Comments off

Here’s How To Get Discounted KitchenAid Tools Right Now

The KitchenAid Stand Mixer, also known as the only baking tool that matters, is not a cheap gadget. We use it in almost every recipe calling for ingredients to be mixed, but still cringe when we remember the price tag. In fact, Delish is constantly scouring the internet for ways to score big discounts on our beloved mixer, in case the one we have breaks or something.

That’s why when Williams Sonoma announced that “The Biggest Bake Sale” would include KitchenAid stand mixers our screams could be heard nationwide. Dramatics aside, the sale is pretty intense. If you’re looking for a new mixer, but don’t necessarily want to spend $600, you’re in for a treat. Use the code bake and watch $600 magically turn into a little over $500 dollars.

BUY A KITCHENAID NOW: KitchenAid Artisan Stand Mixer, $379.95, williams-sonoma.com.

The deal lasts until August 8, and includes a free KitchenAid attachment with the purchase of any mixer. And although not every single Kitchen Aid Stand Mixer is available through the sale, many of the crowd favorites are, like the Metallic Series, the Artisan Series, the Design Series, even the $1000 professional line is on sale. Other participating products are attachments to the mixers, like the spiralizer, food processor, food grinder, juicer, and the heat mixing bowl. Imagine the recipes you could try with all of those.

So you already know what we are up to.

Follow Delish on Instagram.

Download the Delish app.

Category: Kitchenaid  Tags: ,  Comments off

Here’s How To Get Discounted KitchenAid Tools Right Now

The KitchenAid Stand Mixer, also known as the only baking tool that matters, is not a cheap gadget. We use it in almost every recipe calling for ingredients to be mixed, but still cringe when we remember the price tag. In fact, Delish is constantly scouring the internet for ways to score big discounts on our beloved mixer, in case the one we have breaks or something.

That’s why when Williams Sonoma announced that “The Biggest Bake Sale” would include KitchenAid stand mixers our screams could be heard nationwide. Dramatics aside, the sale is pretty intense. If you’re looking for a new mixer, but don’t necessarily want to spend $600, you’re in for a treat. Use the code bake and watch $600 magically turn into a little over $500 dollars.

BUY A KITCHENAID NOW: KitchenAid Artisan Stand Mixer, $379.95, williams-sonoma.com.

The deal lasts until August 8, and includes a free KitchenAid attachment with the purchase of any mixer. And although not every single Kitchen Aid Stand Mixer is available through the sale, many of the crowd favorites are, like the Metallic Series, the Artisan Series, the Design Series, even the $1000 professional line is on sale. Other participating products are attachments to the mixers, like the spiralizer, food processor, food grinder, juicer, and the heat mixing bowl. Imagine the recipes you could try with all of those.

So you already know what we are up to.

Follow Delish on Instagram.

Download the Delish app.

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Medicine Center Pharmacy acquires Marlowe’s Compounding Center as owner retires

A longtime local pharmacy has been acquired by another as a medicine veteran with 56 years in the healthcare industry retires to focus on writing a cook book.

NEW PHILADELPHIA A longtime local pharmacy has been acquired by another as a medicine veteran with 56 years in the healthcare industry retires to focus on writing a cook book. 

Medicine Center Pharmacy in New Philadelphia finalized its purchase on June 27 of Marlowe’s Compounding Center in Dover. As of July 1, Medicine Center has been filling prescriptions and compounding needs for patients — including chickens — formally under the care of pharmacist Jerry Marlowe.

Marlowe, now in his 80s, eyed retirement to spend time with his seven grandchildren. The gourmand, who often switched between his white pharmacy lab coat and white chef’s suit to host cooking classes, said he wants to compile recipes for a cookbook and maybe even return to giving culinary lessons. 

“When you’re 81, you’ve done it all,” Marlowe said. “I thought, well, it’s time.”

Marlowe’s parents, William McKinley “Mac” and Frannie, started the family’s first drug store in 1931 in Dover. Marlowe’s Compounding Center opened over 10 years ago. 

Compounding is nothing new to Paul White and his son Brad White, both registered pharmacists, who bought Marlowe’s Compounding Center. Paul White opened his first of four Medicine Center retail pharmacies just over 40 years ago. Medicine Center Pharmacy has had a compounding center at its New Philadelphia location since 2005, so gaining another compounding center “was a natural fit for us,” said Brad White, who has been the pharmacy manager at the New Philadelphia store for 21 years.

“Since we joined forces with Jerry, we’ve done a lot more veterinary products for small animals — cats, dogs,” he added. “We got a couple chickens now, so it’s kind of fun.”

Medicine Center pharmacies are located in New Philadelphia, Canton, Minerva and Louisville. The compounding center became accredited in 2007 and is a non-sterile lab with trained pharmacists.

“Acquisitions work good for us when we can find a suitable partner,” Paul White said. “Jerry was a suitable partner because he was strictly in the compounding business.”

Compounding is different than a typical pharmacy filling a prescription. Essentially, pharmacists are crafting personalized medications.

“Sometimes, there’s a problem a patient may have that could be better served by a custom solution,” Brad White said.

For example, if a patient has difficulty swallowing pills, a special cream that can be applied topically can be manufactured with the same ingredients as the pill.

Compounded prescriptions are based on physician orders and prepared by mixing prescribed ingredients in specific strength and dosage forms required by each individual patient. The treat a wide range of medical conditions, including hormone therapy, impotence, weight loss, skin conditions, wart removal and prescribed pet medications. 

Inside the compounding lab at the Medicine Center in New Philadelphia, preparation of personalized medicine is done by professionals in white coats, hair nets, masks, gloves and shoe covers. There are multiple scales that integrate with computers to ensure there’s the right mix of chemicals and ingredients. Capsule machines fill the tiny medicine capsules and there’s an automated ointment mill to make creams and ointments that Brad White described as a glorified KitchenAid mixer. Powder containment hoods keep pharmacists and employees safe from inhaling bulk powders as well as keep prepared medicines protected from other chemicals.

In the next several months, the compounding center will be torn out and re-done because of new pharmaceutical standards, Brad White said. The facility will be upgraded to meet new standards of protection and air control. 

That’s also one of the reasons Marlowe looked to retire. As the healthcare field is evolving and with new standards approaching that would require more financial responsibility, “you either get bigger or you get out,” Marlowe said.

“I thought it was time to affiliate with Paul and Brad,” Marlowe said. “(Medicine Center) is three miles away (from Marlowe’s Compounding Center),” Marlowe added. “Many of my patients were from New Philadelphia and I thought I’d have no problem sending my patients three miles away. I have a lot of faith in Brad and his staff.”

Marlowe’s now former compounding center is closed. Prescription files and equipment has been re-located to New Philadelphia. All of Marlowe’s patients were notified of the acquisition through letters and phone calls. Marlowe had one other employee, Mike Miklos, who worked with him 20 hours a week, who also retired from the pharmacy industry.

Paul White said he’s known Marlowe for several years, with their acquaintance beginning in the 1970s. Marlowe reached out to the Whites to see if there would be any interest in Medicine Center purchasing his compounding center. The Medicine Center’s compounding non-sterile lab was accredited in 2007. Total, Medicine Center Pharmacy employs 14 full-time people in New Philadelphia. 

“Jerry has been a fixture in the community for so long, we know he has relationships with patients and providers that would be an addition to our pharmacy business, and help us gain new experience to continue to build our problem-solving skills,” Brad White said. “Jerry has owned other pharmacies in the past; Medicap Pharmacy was in Dover, and that is how our family got to know him. I feel it went a long way to building a relationship of trust to bring this merger together.”

Reach Alex at 330-364-8314 or alex.knisely@TimesReporter.com

On Twitter: @akniselyTR

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How to replace a wooden front door with one that has glass panels

Q: We recently moved into an interior rowhouse. Although we have plenty of windows in the side alley, as well as the front bay and transom windows, I am still desperate for more light. I would like to replace the four-panel front door with one that has glass panels. The house is quite old, and I fear that replacing the entire door will be difficult. Is it possible to take out the raised panels and replace them with glass? Could this be accomplished in just one day?

Washington

A: It is possible to cut out the raised panels and replace them with glass, but whether you would save money or time compared with just replacing the door is debatable. To remake the door, someone would need to visit to measure what size glass panels to order, wait for those to arrive, and then go back to take off the door, do the work and then reinstall the door. To replace the door, the installer would just need to have it available, take down the old door and install the new one. Installation might involve fiddling with hinge placement or planing off a bit of wood to get an exact fit. But these are familiar steps for anyone who installs doors.

For a vintage-looking door with glass panels, you might want to shop for a French door at a store that focuses on used building materials, such as Community Forklift, a nonprofit organization with a store in Edmonston, in the Hyattsville area (301-985-5180; communityforklift.org). The store doesn’t list inventory online, so you would need to go in person. But the store typically has “1,500 doors” to choose from, a spokeswoman said. Prices for glass doors, including French doors, start at $15-$25, but at the low end the doors usually are missing a pane or have some kind of damage. Glass doors in good condition usually cost $35 to $65, although they go up to $95 or more if they are in mint condition.

The store does not recommend installers, but it does have binders filled with business cards of people who do various kinds of repairs and welcome jobs that involve the types of salvaged materials that the store sells. You might want to start by finding an installer, then get that person to help you decide on a door that would be a good fit. Besides getting a door of the right height and width, the thickness needs to match and the hinges need to be on the side where they fit your doorway, with the door swinging inward.

You might need a workaround for the mail slot that’s in your door now. One solution to that might be to choose a door with glass only at the top.

Q: My KitchenAid freezer is stuck. I had cleaned it out entirely because there was a lot of ice built up on the side. Now it is sealed shut. Short of removing all refrigerator items and turning it off, are there other options? The model number is KFCS22EVMS4, and the serial number is K12820673.

Arnold, Md.

A: KitchenAid’s customer service folks recommend that you arrange for a technician to visit. That’s better than just unplugging the unit and waiting for everything to melt, because you could wind up with water on the floor that could lead to other problems, said Harpreet Johal, a customer service representative.

Johal looked up your model and serial number and found that it was purchased on Aug. 31, 2011. The warranty covers different things depending on the time since purchase. You are now in the six- to 10-year period, which means that KitchenAid is responsible for replacing certain equipment but not for labor costs. Covered items are the compressor, evaporator, condenser, dryer and connecting tubing.

You can arrange a service call through KitchenAid (800-422-1230; kitchenaid.com) or through a local appliance dealer. Through KitchenAid, a service call costs $80 to $100, Johal said. For a firm price, you would need to supply your address. If you hire someone locally and they determine that one of the covered parts is the problem, KitchenAid will mail the replacement part at no cost. But either way, you would need to pay to have it installed.

Besides offering phone help for care questions, KitchenAid also offers a chat service. Through that, Caleb H. in Tennessee suggested that the problem could have occurred because the gaskets were dirty or not thoroughly dried after cleaning. “They want to be sure their refrigerator is level,” he wrote. “If that checks out okay, they would need to have a service technician come out to address the issue to avoid any damage to the unit.”

Johal’s reaction to that advice? “This is a troubleshooting step we have to tell you. But I don’t think it’s going to help.”

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I found more than I expected at the World’s Longest Yard Sale

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Category: Skillets  Tags: ,  Comments off