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October 3, 2017 |

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A second antique store joins the growing downtown Waterville arts scene

WATERVILLE — Ed West led a tour of his new shop on Appleton Street downtown, stopping at a wood-framed glass case containing a set of turquoise Royal Dalton dinnerware produced between 1912 and 1923.

“It’s a great color — aqua or turquoise,” he said. “I was attracted to the color. The color is amazing.”

Artwork greets customers at Lunanightday Antiques and Art business on Appleton Street in Waterville on Sept. 26.

Lunanightday Antiques and Art store offers customers fine furniture, art and bowls and vases at the business on Appleton Street in Waterville recently.

West and his partner, artist and photographer Mike Hidalgo, of Waterville, recently opened Lunanightday Antiques Art at 17 Appleton, right in the heart of a flurry of downtown revitalization that includes the new, $25 million residential complex being built by Colby College on Main Street and the college’s recently renovated historic Hains building just across the street.

A networker, West said he is interested in developing an antique and art route to help market niche businesses downtown such as the retro furniture shop Modern Underground and Heirloom Antiques Vintage clothing shop, both on nearby Temple Street. The route, he said, would help downtown become a destination place.

The shop also joins the recently opened Hathaway Mill Antiques at the Hathaway Creative Center.

The ideas of downtown revitalization, reviving historic buildings and promoting the arts in the city’s center appeal to West, 62, and Hidalgo, 54, who named the shop after Hidalgo’s mother’s maiden name, Lunanightday, which means “moon night day.”

The partners deal primarily in porcelain, glass and silver, as well as original artwork, but also carry furniture in a space that feels like an art gallery with its wood floors and freshly-painted walls in an art deco building that also houses Selah Tea. Many offices are in the building, which is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Hidalgo, who graduated last year from University of Maine, Augusta, with an art degree, displays his mixed media works around the shop. The pieces include pen and ink, oil and other media.

The shop features everything from silver tea sets, flatware and trays to porcelain dinnerware and glazed, jewel-toned Majolica pottery from the 1880s. Sets of bronze bells from Cosanti, the Arizona gallery and studio of Italian-American architect Paolo Soleri, lie in a case by the reception area. Included in the collection is a set of bronze wind chimes.

“You would hang them in the yard — basically if you had a place where there’s a good wind because they’re fairly heavy,” West said.

He nodded to a vintage 1960s walnut and ash dining table and two end tables by Lane Acclaim.

“It’s the top-selling pattern that they ever made,” he said.

There’s also a Jean Pouyat floral limoge bowl with gold trim from the 1880s; an old wood tool box, also from that period; a cinnamon-colored vintage Heywood Wakefield corner table from the 1960s and lots more.

The marriage of art and antiques works perfectly in the 585-square-foot former barbershop which has a storage space in the basement of equal size, according to Hidalgo and West. Since opening Sept. 1, they have felt at home and have been welcomed, they said. The building’s owner, Sid Geller, pitched in to help prepare the space. When Hidalgo and West were mulling over what type of light fixtures to suspend from the ceiling, building manager Bruce Fowler offered up a set of six unused art deco lights stored in the basement.

Business so far has been brisk.

“It’s been good,” West said. “We’ve gotten a steady stream of people coming in.”

West and Hidalgo are making new friends with employees of Colby and the technology company, CGI Group Inc., working in the Hains building across the street, people parking in the Colby-owned lot next door to the shop and those getting on and off a shuttle from the Colby campus.

“I think we’re here for the long-term because it’s not expensive to be here, and it gives us a place where we can display the things we have on eBay, and Mike can develop his artwork,” West said.

West, who also works for the U.S. Department of Education, is former chairman of the Gilman Street School Neighborhood Association. Several years ago, before the school was transformed into housing, he and the association helped identify what the neighborhood wanted and what it hoped would happen to the historic school building. At the time Colby students helped survey residents, many of whom were older and said they wanted to stay in the neighborhood, West recalled.

The city is partnering with Colby on revitalization efforts, which include helping to expand and strengthen the arts through Waterville Creates! and supporting existing art-related businesses.

Hidalgo said he likes the fact that new businesses are opening up downtown as part of revitalization and that parents of Colby students who live in the dorm may patronize the shop. West said the city has tried different approaches to revitalization and the current efforts will put more people downtown and help it thrive.

“I think we’ve waited many years for something like this to happen,” he said.

He and Hidalgo encourage people with questions to call the shop at 616-0096. The business is open five days a week, except Wednesdays and Thursdays, and typically opens at 10 a.m. and remains open through the afternoon.

The shop is the second antiques business to open in the city this year, with Hathaway Mill Antiques having opened recently at Hathaway Creative Center at 10 Water St.

The business, which occupies 10,000-square-feet of the building, is a sister shop of Cabot Mill Antiques in Brunswick and carries a variety of period antique furniture and accessories up to mid-century modern pieces. The multi-dealer shop has antique furniture, art, textiles, glassware, jewelry, pottery, books, china, lighting, stained glass windows and more.

Deborah Shufflebeam, who manages both the Hathaway and Cabot shops, said the Waterville site keeps adding items and hosted a grand opening last weekend.

“You’ll see a lot of additional dealers that have come in to set up booths and we’re expanding daily,” she said. “We’ve been received very well by the community — not only by the local community — we’re bringing in quite a tourist trade from the lakes area and Route 1, Camden, Rockland and Rockport.”

Like West and Hidalgo, Shufflebeam is optimistic about the local market for antiques and art. Shufflebeam said people are hungry for it.

“We’ve been really well-received, and I think we’re starting to be an anchor, not only for the building but for the city of Waterville as well,” she said.

North River Hathaway, doing business as Hathaway Mill Antiques, is part of Waterfront Maine, a New York-based real estate development firm that bought the Hathaway Creative Center from Hathaway Mill PO LLC in February for $20 million. North River owns the Brunswick mill, known as Fort Andross Mill, as well as other mills in Portland, Boston and New York. Ford Andross Mill formerly was known as the Cabot Mill.

Amy Calder — 861-9247

[email protected]

Twitter: @AmyCalder17

 


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Category: Dinnerware  Tags: ,  Comments off

Bunker Hill family calls for kid-friendly design

Caption

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Ryan Amor is just 4 years old, but he’s put nearly every piece of furniture in his parents’ new home to the test.

He’s smeared crayons, spilled food coloring and dropped messy burritos on chairs, rugs and the sofa.

When his parents, Karrie and Courtney Amor, bought their Bunker Hill home in May 2016, they considered it a fresh start after living in the Pearland home they’d shared since they were in their medical residencies here.


Karrie already knew her two sons, Ryan and his 9-year-old brother, Kyle, were messy kids. But she wanted nice furniture in her new home and knew she’d need an interior designer who understood children.

She Googled “kid-friendly designer” and found Karen Davis, who owns the Marker Girl interior design firm. She knows messy kids – she was one herself. Now, as a mom of two, she has a daughter who’s just as messy as she was.

Kid-friendly decorating tips

1. Kids will put fabric to the test. If you’re investing in nice furniture, invest in better fabric. It will resist stains, stand up to harsh light and will resist water, too.

2. Decide which furniture is most important and spend more on it. Then fill in with less expensive things to keep you on budget. Don’t be afraid to find things like lamps, mirrors or other accessories at places like Target, Home Goods or other retail chain stores.

3. One great hack on rugs is to find a carpet you like, then have a piece cut and bound to fit the size you need.

4. For artwork, try budget-friendly prints that can be sized to fit the scale you need. If you use inexpensive pre-made frames, give them an upgrade with better mattes and glass.

5. Love a piece but hate its drawer knobs or pulls? Swap them out with updated styles you can find in hardware and specialty stores.

6. If any room needs a makeover and you don’t know where to start, break it down into these steps: furniture, windows, rugs, paint color, lighting, art and accessories.

Sources: Karen Davis, Marker Girl interior design firm

 


The Davis-Amor collaboration happened in two phases. The first began when they bought the house and included the study, kitchen, family room and breakfast room in the design plans. They finished it up in September of that year, then picked up again in January 2017, spending a few months finishing off the dining room, music room and master bedroom.

Kid-friendly design meant putting cabinets in the places where kids do homework and play, so toys and games can come out when needed and be put away when the rooms need to look tidy.

Most important, though, was fabric. It had to hold up to all of those spills, be UV protected and also tolerate water and chlorine from the backyard pool.


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Translator

To read this article in one of Houston’s most-spoken languages, click on the button below.


Style


“I didn’t want to be yelling at them all of the time,” Karrie said of her sons. “The nice thing about this fabric, you get a wet sponge and it wipes right off.”

Her designer agreed. “Be adamant about the better fabric; it’s worth the upcharge,” Davis said.

The home’s main hub is the family room, breakfast area and kitchen.

A dark backsplash in the kitchen was replaced with Cararra marble tile that looked good with the black granite counters already in the room. Satin-nickel, lantern-style pendants over one counter lighten up the room, too.

Barstools that came with the house were dark and rustic, the opposite look the California natives wanted. They were all about light and soft, coastal cool colors – soft whites, blue-green and grays.

They lightened up the frames and swapped out upholstery and nailhead trim for light vinyl and a clean finish. That same vinyl covers a long bench on the boys’ side of the breakfast table.

Karrie Amor calls her family “couch people,” so a sturdy sectional sofa in the family room works for them. Instead of a hard coffee table, they opted for a vinyl ottoman, which the kids can climb on; it will hold up to anything.

Just behind the sofa is a console in a light-gray wood with antiqued mirror fronts. While it looks perfect aesthetically, it does some heavy lifting functionally, packed with puzzles, coloring books and games the boys likes to play.

And two highback chairs were created for Karrie’s parents, who visit from California frequently. Her father has had knee and hip replacements, so the chair needed to be protective and also easy for him to get in and out of.

The Amors hadn’t started collecting art, but they wanted pieces throughout the home. To stay on budget, they opted for prints and other pieces created in the size they wanted by Unique Arts.

One piece that Davis created for their foyer is a unique work of fiber art placed on fabric and framed. It’s beautiful and unique, and budget friendly.

That was another big factor: the budget. The family needed to fill a whole house but couldn’t overspend. They put more money into good furniture and saved on art and accessories.

One example is the music room. Davis encouraged them to buy an upright piano because it would leave room for seating. Two gray chairs sit on top of a blue rug, created by binding a piece of Stainmaster carpet. It was an easy and affordable way to get just the rug they wanted.

They did the same thing – bound carpet for rugs – in the family room and study, too, where the Amors do occasional work and the boys sit around a big square table to do homework or play games.

While they spent more on chairs and the piano, they saved on accessories: old sheet music was framed in panels of glass for art; mirrors, candlesticks and other items were found at great prices at stores like Pier 1, Kirklands, Target and HomeGoods.

A big, custom cabinet in the study was an investment piece, where they display old family photos and mementoes. One wall of the room is dedicated to Karrie and Courtney’s accomplishments: their college and medical school diplomas – she’s a dermatologist and he’s an orthopedic surgeon.

Another lesson – repurposing – came into play in the dining room. The Amors bought the dining table and chairs from the home’s previous owner but knew the lovely velvet slipcovered chairs would not pass the kid test.

They were reupholstered in Crypton fabric that holds up to any spill. While the table and chairs were custom pieces, everything else that finishes the room was more affordable. Two table lamps on a buffet were just $50 from Lowe’s, but look remarkably like Robert Abbey pieces that cost $300 or more.

In homes with active children, Davis said, those choices are smart choices.

She shopped all over for accessories, then showed them to the Amors without telling them what they cost or where they were from. Her only question: Do you like it?

“I tell people, trust me, it will look good,” she said. Accessories don’t have to come with big price tags. “When you have a child who’s 4 and he knocks over a $10 vase … I don’t want them stressing that the kids can’t run in the house. “

 

Category: Accessories  Tags: ,  Comments off

Bunker Hill family calls for kid-friendly design

Caption

Close


Ryan Amor is just 4 years old, but he’s put nearly every piece of furniture in his parents’ new home to the test.

He’s smeared crayons, spilled food coloring and dropped messy burritos on chairs, rugs and the sofa.

When his parents, Karrie and Courtney Amor, bought their Bunker Hill home in May 2016, they considered it a fresh start after living in the Pearland home they’d shared since they were in their medical residencies here.


Karrie already knew her two sons, Ryan and his 9-year-old brother, Kyle, were messy kids. But she wanted nice furniture in her new home and knew she’d need an interior designer who understood children.

She Googled “kid-friendly designer” and found Karen Davis, who owns the Marker Girl interior design firm. She knows messy kids – she was one herself. Now, as a mom of two, she has a daughter who’s just as messy as she was.

Kid-friendly decorating tips

1. Kids will put fabric to the test. If you’re investing in nice furniture, invest in better fabric. It will resist stains, stand up to harsh light and will resist water, too.

2. Decide which furniture is most important and spend more on it. Then fill in with less expensive things to keep you on budget. Don’t be afraid to find things like lamps, mirrors or other accessories at places like Target, Home Goods or other retail chain stores.

3. One great hack on rugs is to find a carpet you like, then have a piece cut and bound to fit the size you need.

4. For artwork, try budget-friendly prints that can be sized to fit the scale you need. If you use inexpensive pre-made frames, give them an upgrade with better mattes and glass.

5. Love a piece but hate its drawer knobs or pulls? Swap them out with updated styles you can find in hardware and specialty stores.

6. If any room needs a makeover and you don’t know where to start, break it down into these steps: furniture, windows, rugs, paint color, lighting, art and accessories.

Sources: Karen Davis, Marker Girl interior design firm

 


The Davis-Amor collaboration happened in two phases. The first began when they bought the house and included the study, kitchen, family room and breakfast room in the design plans. They finished it up in September of that year, then picked up again in January 2017, spending a few months finishing off the dining room, music room and master bedroom.

Kid-friendly design meant putting cabinets in the places where kids do homework and play, so toys and games can come out when needed and be put away when the rooms need to look tidy.

Most important, though, was fabric. It had to hold up to all of those spills, be UV protected and also tolerate water and chlorine from the backyard pool.


img {
width:100%;
}
#traductor p {
width: 100%;
}
.right{
text-align:right;
}
#google_translate_element {
border-bottom: 5px solid
padding-bottom:20px;
}
]]>

Translator

To read this article in one of Houston’s most-spoken languages, click on the button below.


Style


“I didn’t want to be yelling at them all of the time,” Karrie said of her sons. “The nice thing about this fabric, you get a wet sponge and it wipes right off.”

Her designer agreed. “Be adamant about the better fabric; it’s worth the upcharge,” Davis said.

The home’s main hub is the family room, breakfast area and kitchen.

A dark backsplash in the kitchen was replaced with Cararra marble tile that looked good with the black granite counters already in the room. Satin-nickel, lantern-style pendants over one counter lighten up the room, too.

Barstools that came with the house were dark and rustic, the opposite look the California natives wanted. They were all about light and soft, coastal cool colors – soft whites, blue-green and grays.

They lightened up the frames and swapped out upholstery and nailhead trim for light vinyl and a clean finish. That same vinyl covers a long bench on the boys’ side of the breakfast table.

Karrie Amor calls her family “couch people,” so a sturdy sectional sofa in the family room works for them. Instead of a hard coffee table, they opted for a vinyl ottoman, which the kids can climb on; it will hold up to anything.

Just behind the sofa is a console in a light-gray wood with antiqued mirror fronts. While it looks perfect aesthetically, it does some heavy lifting functionally, packed with puzzles, coloring books and games the boys likes to play.

And two highback chairs were created for Karrie’s parents, who visit from California frequently. Her father has had knee and hip replacements, so the chair needed to be protective and also easy for him to get in and out of.

The Amors hadn’t started collecting art, but they wanted pieces throughout the home. To stay on budget, they opted for prints and other pieces created in the size they wanted by Unique Arts.

One piece that Davis created for their foyer is a unique work of fiber art placed on fabric and framed. It’s beautiful and unique, and budget friendly.

That was another big factor: the budget. The family needed to fill a whole house but couldn’t overspend. They put more money into good furniture and saved on art and accessories.

One example is the music room. Davis encouraged them to buy an upright piano because it would leave room for seating. Two gray chairs sit on top of a blue rug, created by binding a piece of Stainmaster carpet. It was an easy and affordable way to get just the rug they wanted.

They did the same thing – bound carpet for rugs – in the family room and study, too, where the Amors do occasional work and the boys sit around a big square table to do homework or play games.

While they spent more on chairs and the piano, they saved on accessories: old sheet music was framed in panels of glass for art; mirrors, candlesticks and other items were found at great prices at stores like Pier 1, Kirklands, Target and HomeGoods.

A big, custom cabinet in the study was an investment piece, where they display old family photos and mementoes. One wall of the room is dedicated to Karrie and Courtney’s accomplishments: their college and medical school diplomas – she’s a dermatologist and he’s an orthopedic surgeon.

Another lesson – repurposing – came into play in the dining room. The Amors bought the dining table and chairs from the home’s previous owner but knew the lovely velvet slipcovered chairs would not pass the kid test.

They were reupholstered in Crypton fabric that holds up to any spill. While the table and chairs were custom pieces, everything else that finishes the room was more affordable. Two table lamps on a buffet were just $50 from Lowe’s, but look remarkably like Robert Abbey pieces that cost $300 or more.

In homes with active children, Davis said, those choices are smart choices.

She shopped all over for accessories, then showed them to the Amors without telling them what they cost or where they were from. Her only question: Do you like it?

“I tell people, trust me, it will look good,” she said. Accessories don’t have to come with big price tags. “When you have a child who’s 4 and he knocks over a $10 vase … I don’t want them stressing that the kids can’t run in the house. “

 

Category: Accessories  Tags: ,  Comments off

Hayburn & Co.’s 5 Golden Rules For Creating A Small Kitchen

The key to a making a small kitchen work well is sufficient storage and
careful planning, based on how you use the space day-to-day. Here are the
golden rules to follow when designing a small kitchen.


Be meticulous in your planning.

How much space will you need for tableware? How wide are your largest dinner plates? Your cupboards will need to be at least that depth. Do you have a lot of cookware? Is baking a priority for you? Allocate absolutely everything a space before you begin and consider placement. Keep everyday crockery and cutlery near your dining area and dishwasher for easy use, and look to wall-mounted utensils and knives near your cooker hob. The Hampton style kitchen from Hayburn Co. seen above and below, is known for its spacious and grand proportions, which can also work well in smaller, more modest homes.

Keep appliances hidden.

In a small kitchen, keeping lines clean is crucial. Hide any white goods, such as refrigerators and dishwashers, behind the kitchen joinery. The less a kitchen is broken up the bigger it will seem. Above is a perfect example, with only the oven and grill on display, from Hayburn Co.’s The Hampton Collection, which features oak veneered carcass and polished chrome hardware.

Consider your cupboard internals.

Give every item a home and tailor the inside of each cupboard to suit its contents. Deep saucepan drawers are ideal for storage of pots and pans. Dividers in a cupboard are a great way to store baking trays and chopping boards, they will all be visible and it will be much easier than stacking them. Consider tiered shelving, so all your food items will be on display and easily accessible. Installing a spice rack on the inside of a cupboard door frees up space makes them easy to reach.

Cupboard space is not always king.

Make sure a corner cupboard is functional as it’s likely going to be the largest space you have in a kitchen. However, elsewhere cupboards needn’t be large. If they are too big, you may spend forever searching for items and will be more likely to ‘double buy’ because you’re not sure what you already own – this goes for pots and pans, as well as food. Use smaller units, and store items you don’t use everyday, like large saucepans, slowcookers and serving dishes, out of the way in a nearby pantry, utility room or under the stairs.

Keep surfaces clear.

You’ll need to save as much space as you can for cooking prep. This means giving small electrical items like toasters and mixers a home in the cupboard, where easily accessible electrical sockets can live. This way, you won’t need to untangle unsightly wires. Breakfast larders are ideal for food and crockery storage, or if you are a keen baker then a larder is the perfect place to store baking ingredients, bowls, utensils and a mixer. The easier they are to access, the greater your chance of using them. Finally, a boiling water tap will remove the need for a kettle and free up valuable worktop space. With minimal clutter, eyes can be drawn to paint colours, worktop materials and the elegant handles that come in multiple choices in The Hampton kitchen, pictured above.


Hayburn Co. are based in Ballymena, Co. Antrim and offer an array of luxury joinery services, from custom kitchen and bathroom cabinets to deluxe home packages. For more design tips, visit Hayburn.com or call 0044 845 371 2420 and make an appointment with one of their experienced designers at the newly relaunched showroom.

Follow @hayburnco on Instagram for daily inspiration and look to Hayburn Co.‘s Pinterest for more visual ideas.

Category: Cookware Pots  Tags: ,  Comments off

Hayburn & Co.’s 5 Golden Rules For Creating A Small Kitchen

The key to a making a small kitchen work well is sufficient storage and
careful planning, based on how you use the space day-to-day. Here are the
golden rules to follow when designing a small kitchen.


Be meticulous in your planning.

How much space will you need for tableware? How wide are your largest dinner plates? Your cupboards will need to be at least that depth. Do you have a lot of cookware? Is baking a priority for you? Allocate absolutely everything a space before you begin and consider placement. Keep everyday crockery and cutlery near your dining area and dishwasher for easy use, and look to wall-mounted utensils and knives near your cooker hob. The Hampton style kitchen from Hayburn Co. seen above and below, is known for its spacious and grand proportions, which can also work well in smaller, more modest homes.

Keep appliances hidden.

In a small kitchen, keeping lines clean is crucial. Hide any white goods, such as refrigerators and dishwashers, behind the kitchen joinery. The less a kitchen is broken up the bigger it will seem. Above is a perfect example, with only the oven and grill on display, from Hayburn Co.’s The Hampton Collection, which features oak veneered carcass and polished chrome hardware.

Consider your cupboard internals.

Give every item a home and tailor the inside of each cupboard to suit its contents. Deep saucepan drawers are ideal for storage of pots and pans. Dividers in a cupboard are a great way to store baking trays and chopping boards, they will all be visible and it will be much easier than stacking them. Consider tiered shelving, so all your food items will be on display and easily accessible. Installing a spice rack on the inside of a cupboard door frees up space makes them easy to reach.

Cupboard space is not always king.

Make sure a corner cupboard is functional as it’s likely going to be the largest space you have in a kitchen. However, elsewhere cupboards needn’t be large. If they are too big, you may spend forever searching for items and will be more likely to ‘double buy’ because you’re not sure what you already own – this goes for pots and pans, as well as food. Use smaller units, and store items you don’t use everyday, like large saucepans, slowcookers and serving dishes, out of the way in a nearby pantry, utility room or under the stairs.

Keep surfaces clear.

You’ll need to save as much space as you can for cooking prep. This means giving small electrical items like toasters and mixers a home in the cupboard, where easily accessible electrical sockets can live. This way, you won’t need to untangle unsightly wires. Breakfast larders are ideal for food and crockery storage, or if you are a keen baker then a larder is the perfect place to store baking ingredients, bowls, utensils and a mixer. The easier they are to access, the greater your chance of using them. Finally, a boiling water tap will remove the need for a kettle and free up valuable worktop space. With minimal clutter, eyes can be drawn to paint colours, worktop materials and the elegant handles that come in multiple choices in The Hampton kitchen, pictured above.


Hayburn Co. are based in Ballymena, Co. Antrim and offer an array of luxury joinery services, from custom kitchen and bathroom cabinets to deluxe home packages. For more design tips, visit Hayburn.com or call 0044 845 371 2420 and make an appointment with one of their experienced designers at the newly relaunched showroom.

Follow @hayburnco on Instagram for daily inspiration and look to Hayburn Co.‘s Pinterest for more visual ideas.

Category: Cookware Pots  Tags: ,  Comments off

A second antique store joins the growing downtown Waterville arts scene

WATERVILLE — Ed West led a tour of his new shop on Appleton Street downtown, stopping at a wood-framed glass case containing a set of turquoise Royal Dalton dinnerware produced between 1912 and 1923.

“It’s a great color — aqua or turquoise,” he said. “I was attracted to the color. The color is amazing.”

Artwork greets customers at Lunanightday Antiques and Art business on Appleton Street in Waterville on Sept. 26.

Lunanightday Antiques and Art store offers customers fine furniture, art and bowls and vases at the business on Appleton Street in Waterville recently.

West and his partner, artist and photographer Mike Hidalgo, of Waterville, recently opened Lunanightday Antiques Art at 17 Appleton, right in the heart of a flurry of downtown revitalization that includes the new, $25 million residential complex being built by Colby College on Main Street and the college’s recently renovated historic Hains building just across the street.

A networker, West said he is interested in developing an antique and art route to help market niche businesses downtown such as the retro furniture shop Modern Underground and Heirloom Antiques Vintage clothing shop, both on nearby Temple Street. The route, he said, would help downtown become a destination place.

The shop also joins the recently opened Hathaway Mill Antiques at the Hathaway Creative Center.

The ideas of downtown revitalization, reviving historic buildings and promoting the arts in the city’s center appeal to West, 62, and Hidalgo, 54, who named the shop after Hidalgo’s mother’s maiden name, Lunanightday, which means “moon night day.”

The partners deal primarily in porcelain, glass and silver, as well as original artwork, but also carry furniture in a space that feels like an art gallery with its wood floors and freshly-painted walls in an art deco building that also houses Selah Tea. Many offices are in the building, which is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Hidalgo, who graduated last year from University of Maine, Augusta, with an art degree, displays his mixed media works around the shop. The pieces include pen and ink, oil and other media.

The shop features everything from silver tea sets, flatware and trays to porcelain dinnerware and glazed, jewel-toned Majolica pottery from the 1880s. Sets of bronze bells from Cosanti, the Arizona gallery and studio of Italian-American architect Paolo Soleri, lie in a case by the reception area. Included in the collection is a set of bronze wind chimes.

“You would hang them in the yard — basically if you had a place where there’s a good wind because they’re fairly heavy,” West said.

He nodded to a vintage 1960s walnut and ash dining table and two end tables by Lane Acclaim.

“It’s the top-selling pattern that they ever made,” he said.

There’s also a Jean Pouyat floral limoge bowl with gold trim from the 1880s; an old wood tool box, also from that period; a cinnamon-colored vintage Heywood Wakefield corner table from the 1960s and lots more.

The marriage of art and antiques works perfectly in the 585-square-foot former barbershop which has a storage space in the basement of equal size, according to Hidalgo and West. Since opening Sept. 1, they have felt at home and have been welcomed, they said. The building’s owner, Sid Geller, pitched in to help prepare the space. When Hidalgo and West were mulling over what type of light fixtures to suspend from the ceiling, building manager Bruce Fowler offered up a set of six unused art deco lights stored in the basement.

Business so far has been brisk.

“It’s been good,” West said. “We’ve gotten a steady stream of people coming in.”

West and Hidalgo are making new friends with employees of Colby and the technology company, CGI Group Inc., working in the Hains building across the street, people parking in the Colby-owned lot next door to the shop and those getting on and off a shuttle from the Colby campus.

“I think we’re here for the long-term because it’s not expensive to be here, and it gives us a place where we can display the things we have on eBay, and Mike can develop his artwork,” West said.

West, who also works for the U.S. Department of Education, is former chairman of the Gilman Street School Neighborhood Association. Several years ago, before the school was transformed into housing, he and the association helped identify what the neighborhood wanted and what it hoped would happen to the historic school building. At the time Colby students helped survey residents, many of whom were older and said they wanted to stay in the neighborhood, West recalled.

The city is partnering with Colby on revitalization efforts, which include helping to expand and strengthen the arts through Waterville Creates! and supporting existing art-related businesses.

Hidalgo said he likes the fact that new businesses are opening up downtown as part of revitalization and that parents of Colby students who live in the dorm may patronize the shop. West said the city has tried different approaches to revitalization and the current efforts will put more people downtown and help it thrive.

“I think we’ve waited many years for something like this to happen,” he said.

He and Hidalgo encourage people with questions to call the shop at 616-0096. The business is open five days a week, except Wednesdays and Thursdays, and typically opens at 10 a.m. and remains open through the afternoon.

The shop is the second antiques business to open in the city this year, with Hathaway Mill Antiques having opened recently at Hathaway Creative Center at 10 Water St.

The business, which occupies 10,000-square-feet of the building, is a sister shop of Cabot Mill Antiques in Brunswick and carries a variety of period antique furniture and accessories up to mid-century modern pieces. The multi-dealer shop has antique furniture, art, textiles, glassware, jewelry, pottery, books, china, lighting, stained glass windows and more.

Deborah Shufflebeam, who manages both the Hathaway and Cabot shops, said the Waterville site keeps adding items and hosted a grand opening last weekend.

“You’ll see a lot of additional dealers that have come in to set up booths and we’re expanding daily,” she said. “We’ve been received very well by the community — not only by the local community — we’re bringing in quite a tourist trade from the lakes area and Route 1, Camden, Rockland and Rockport.”

Like West and Hidalgo, Shufflebeam is optimistic about the local market for antiques and art. Shufflebeam said people are hungry for it.

“We’ve been really well-received, and I think we’re starting to be an anchor, not only for the building but for the city of Waterville as well,” she said.

North River Hathaway, doing business as Hathaway Mill Antiques, is part of Waterfront Maine, a New York-based real estate development firm that bought the Hathaway Creative Center from Hathaway Mill PO LLC in February for $20 million. North River owns the Brunswick mill, known as Fort Andross Mill, as well as other mills in Portland, Boston and New York. Ford Andross Mill formerly was known as the Cabot Mill.

Amy Calder — 861-9247

[email protected]

Twitter: @AmyCalder17

 


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Category: Dinnerware  Tags: ,  Comments off

Children’s plates, bowls recalled because of choking hazard

The maker of a line of children’s dinnerware has issued a recall because of a potential choking hazard.

Playtex Products is voluntarily recalling its plates and bowls, according to the company’s website.

The white polypropylene plates and bowls have designs such as cars, princesses, construction scenes and superheroes. They were sold separately and as sets from October 2009 to August 2017.

The clear plastic layer over the graphics can peel or bubble from the surface of the plates and bowls, posing a choking hazard to young children, said the Consumer Product Safety Commission.

Consumers should contact Playtex to return the products for a full refund. They can call 888-220-2075 from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. Central Time Monday through Friday or go online at www.playtexproducts.com.

The company has received 372 reports of the clear plastic layer bubbling or peeling, the CPSC said. There were 11 reports of pieces of the plastic found in children’s mouths, including four reports of choking on a piece of the clear plastic.

About 3.6 million were sold in the U.S., according to Playtex, at Babies“R”Us, Target, Wal-Mart, and other stores and online at Amazon.com.

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What to do if you think you have a recalled product

There are many numbers and dates on the foods, drugs, cosmetics, and other products we use every day. Some help manufacturers track inventory, while others help retailers ensure quality. But when unsafe products must be removed from the market, these numbers and dates can also help identify them quickly.
(Courtesy of U.S. Food and Drug Administration)

Category: Dinnerware  Tags: ,  Comments off