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October 4, 2017 |

Archive for » October 4th, 2017«

Home calendar for the week of Oct. 8-14

Monday, Oct. 9

Halloween boutique: Visit Roger’s Gardens and step into a world of Magic Mayhem. “Magical” creatures are for sale behind windows stacked with wands and broomsticks. Boutique available various times and dates through Oct. 28. 2301 San Joaquin Hills Road, Corona del Mar. 949-640-5800 or rogersgardens.com

Tuesday, Oct. 10

Kombucha Class: Learn about the history and benefits of kombucha as well as how to make the drink yourself. Light refreshments will be served. $35. 6-7:30 p.m. Fermentation Farm. 1125 Victoria St., Suite R, Costa Mesa. 949-650-0830 or fermfarm.com

Friday, Oct. 13

Christmas boutique: Get inspired by Joyeux Noël at Roger’s Gardens. Celebrate the diversity and richness of European Christmas traditions enhanced with modern influences and themes. Glass ornaments are hand blown and hand decorated in family workshops in Poland, Nutcrackers made in Germany accompany seasonal dinnerware from Portugal and Italy. Boutique open various times and dates through Dec. 23. 2301 San Joaquin Hills Road, Corona del Mar. 949-640-5800 or rogersgardens.com

Category: Dinnerware  Tags: ,  Comments off

How to create a no-build outdoor kitchen

The instant outdoor kitchen for those who can't be bothered to build an outdoor kitchen, it's the Jumbuck 4 Burner ...

Position a table like this next to your barbecue and you have an instant counter top. Better yet, have two and position ...

Hanging baskets are great for growing herbs for cooking. The Penny Drops baskets pictured are hand-coiled using cotton ...

The perfect size fridge for tucking away underneath a table. Made of stainless steel with a recessed handle, the Bull ...

It's simple - to cook, you need light. Bring industrial charm outdoors with the Kmart solar cage string lights, which ...

A rustic tray can be used to serve food, house pot plants or store glassware and plates. The Ploughmans oval serving ...

If you're grilling meats, you're going to need an apron. Combining utility and bohemian spirit, this striped apron with ...

Dress up your outdoor serving space with a sturdy drink dispenser filled with cocktails or mocktails prepared in bulk. ...

Everyone loves pizza, even those with small backyards. Ideal for petite outdoor spaces, you can roll it in and then roll ...

The Metal Peel by Firebox is the essential accessory didn't know you needed for getting the pizzas out of your outdoor ...

Made of aluminium, powder coated and finished with a teak seat, the Max outdoor bar stool is built to last. Line then up ...

The centrepiece of the outdoor kitchen is the barbecue. If you don't have one, a good 'family' size option that won't ...

Store your barbecue equipment in style at the end of the day with aged rimu magnetic holders by Billdan Design.  The ...

Or if you'd like to go for a truly cost-cutting alternative to an outdoor fridge, there's always a grand-scale ice ...

The instant outdoor kitchen for those who can’t be bothered to build an outdoor kitchen, it’s the Jumbuck 4 Burner Outdoor Kitchen from Bunnings. It’s got it all – a cast iron cooking grill and hotplate, 430 grade stainless steel hood, fascia and sink with tap, an enamel coated firebox, warming rack, storage for your gas bottle, plus hose and regulator. $998 from Bunnings and you didn’t have to pick up a hammer.

Position a table like this next to your barbecue and you have an instant counter top. Better yet, have two and position the second so guests can sit on the other side with stools. Made of solid Teak, the Bali 203B folding table from I-Furniture is $199.

Hanging baskets are great for growing herbs for cooking. The Penny Drops baskets pictured are hand-coiled using cotton rope, and finished with wooden beads. $23 each from The Market NZ.

The perfect size fridge for tucking away underneath a table. Made of stainless steel with a recessed handle, the Bull 508mm compact outdoor refrigerator is $699.

It’s simple – to cook, you need light. Bring industrial charm outdoors with the Kmart solar cage string lights, which will turn on automatically when it gets dark. $17.

A rustic tray can be used to serve food, house pot plants or store glassware and plates. The Ploughmans oval serving tray from French Country Collections even has iron handles for extra oldtime charm. $159.

If you’re grilling meats, you’re going to need an apron. Combining utility and bohemian spirit, this striped apron with pocket from Trade Aid is $39.99

Dress up your outdoor serving space with a sturdy drink dispenser filled with cocktails or mocktails prepared in bulk. Terrace pave drink dispenser, $69.99 from Farmers.

Everyone loves pizza, even those with small backyards. Ideal for petite outdoor spaces, you can roll it in and then roll it away. The Jumbuck charcoal pizza oven from Bunnings is $249.

The Metal Peel by Firebox is the essential accessory didn’t know you needed for getting the pizzas out of your outdoor pizza oven. $34.99 from Mitre 10.

Made of aluminium, powder coated and finished with a teak seat, the Max outdoor bar stool is built to last. Line then up along the other side of your ‘counter top’ for an instant outdoor kitchen island. $218.99 from Cintesi.

The centrepiece of the outdoor kitchen is the barbecue. If you don’t have one, a good ‘family’ size option that won’t break the bank is the Weber Spirit Premium E-310. $1299 from Outdoor Concepts.

Store your barbecue equipment in style at the end of the day with aged rimu magnetic holders by Billdan Design. The holders are easily mounted onto smooth surfaces using a double sided, heavy duty mounting tape. $19.95 each from The Market NZ.

Or if you’d like to go for a truly cost-cutting alternative to an outdoor fridge, there’s always a grand-scale ice bucket to pop on your table top. This 20L metal drink cooler from Kmart is just $12.

A second kitchen outdoors is a big-ticket style statement in a home.

But they’re also just fun and look fabulous for entertaining.

You can shop and style your way to an outdoor kitchen, no builders required.

Take the minimal or the maximal approach. Bigger budgets can splurge on BBQ technology, smaller budgets can get creative with accessories.

READ MORE:
* A dream outdoor kitchen
* 11 ways with fairylights
* Go glamping in Wales

Here’s how to get the outdoor kitchen look with less money and time required.


 – Homed

Next Garden story:

Taranaki’s garden warrior

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Michael Rakowitz aims to connect cultures with art and a food truck

How does “Backstroke of the West,” the Michael Rakowitz solo exhibition at the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, break the rules for an art show? Let us use bullets to enumerate the ways, a choice that seems appropriate for an exhibition that is in part about the connections between conflict and every-day life.

  • Its aesthetic, for Rakowitz’s high-concept riffs on Arab-American relations, recalls the workbench more than the art gallery. Unfinished wood is everywhere. Much of the text is Rakowitz’s own handwriting. Visitors enter through the exposed backside — the raw wooden framework — of a replica of the blue-tiled Ishtar Gate of ancient Babylon; you only see the front when you’ve entered the exhibition
  • Some of the “wall text,” the explanatory labels museums glue up to explain what we are seeing, is printed on the floor.
  • “Backstroke’s” newly commissioned work, a short film, features a GI Joe-like doll going to the Oriental Institute Museum at the University of Chicago and telling the Iraqi artifacts there they deserve to be free. This provocateur is not just any doll; it’s Special Ops Cody, a figure sold exclusively at U.S. bases in Iraq and Kuwait, Rakowitz said, that became famous when insurgents posed it as a hostage in a temporarily convincing video.
  • And then there is the matter of the food truck parked on the plaza outside the museum, decorated with a golden eagle emblem inspired by one found on Saddam Hussein’s dinnerware. Almost weekly since the exhibit opened in mid-September, the “Enemy Kitchen” truck has served Iraqi cuisine, recipes from Rakowitz’s Iraqi-Jewish mother, free to visitors. The servers are American Iraq War veterans, and the next serving is 6 p.m. Friday.

With “Enemy Kitchen,” the Iraqi-American artist, a 43-year-old native New Yorker who lives in Evanston and teaches at Northwestern, wanted to use cuisine to encourage dialogue. What does it mean to eat the food of the “enemy,” a question he first posed when he debuted the truck in 2003? What does it mean to eat it off the paper-plate replicas of Saddam’s china that Rakowitz has made?

Or, as the artist asks in the exhibition catalog, “How could this generous hospitality be the fruit of such hostility?”

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Cooking for a Cause – Odessa American: Food

If you love to entertain and want to support a good cause, now you can do both at the same time.

Currently in its 16th year, Cook for the Cure is a program that gives those with a passion for cooking a way to support the fight against breast cancer. Through culinary-based fundraising, events, auctions and the sale of select products, the partnership between KitchenAid and Susan G. Komen for the Cure® has raised more than $10.7 million for the cause.

“It adds another layer of purpose to one of life’s great pleasures, cooking and enjoying food with family and friends,” said Anthony Pastrick, brand manager for KitchenAid. “The program continues to fuel passionate cooks with simple, creative ways to support a meaningful cause.”

You can make a difference by hosting a party that lets you Cook for the Cure by raising awareness and funds for breast cancer research. Here are some ideas to get you started:

  • Invite guests for an evening of appetizers, such as these Mini Fruit Tarts, and drinks. Encourage fundraising by awarding a prize to the guest with the highest donation, or let donors enter their names into a drawing to win a restaurant gift certificate or spa treatment.
  • Organize a fundraising bake sale. Get the neighbors involved in baking, promoting and selling – it’s a great way to bring people together. Your contribution could be these Lemon Berry Cheesecake Bars.
  • Host a potluck brainstorming party. Invite people who share your passion for helping others to bring their favorite dish and think up creative ways to support the cause as a group. Vote on a project then let everyone pitch in to get started. Cooking good food, sharing time with friends and giving back to the community – that’s a recipe for a truly great party. Learn more at CookfortheCure.com.

Lemon Berry Cheesecake Bars

Recipe courtesy of Lindsay Conchar of Life, Love Sugar on behalf of KitchenAid

Makes: 12-16 bars

  • 1 1/2 cups graham cracker crumbs
  • 5 tablespoons butter, melted
  • 16 ounces cream cheese, at room temperature
  • 1 1/2 cups powdered sugar, divided
  • 3 tablespoons lemon juice
  • 1 tablespoon lemon zest
  • 1 1/4 cups heavy whipping cream, divided
  • fresh berries

Line 9-inch square cake pan with parchment paper, bringing up over sides.

Combine graham cracker crumbs and butter, and stir until well combined. Press crumb mixture evenly into bottom of cake pan. Set aside.

In bowl of stand mixer, beat cream cheese, 1 cup powdered sugar, lemon juice and lemon zest until smooth. In separate bowl, whip heavy whipping cream until it starts to thicken. Add remaining powdered sugar and continue to whip until stiff peaks form. Gently fold half the whipped cream into cheesecake mixture and place remainder in refrigerator to use later. Spread cheesecake mixture evenly in cake pan.

Refrigerate cheesecake at least 4 hours, or until firm.

Use parchment paper on sides to lift bars out of pan then cut into squares. Use remaining whipped cream to top cheesecake bars then add fresh berries, as desired. Refrigerate until ready to serve.


Mini Fruit Tarts

Recipe courtesy of Kelly Kwok of Life Made Sweeter on behalf of KitchenAid

Makes: 6 pastries

Pastries:

  • 1 frozen puff pastry sheet (17.3 ounces), thawed
  • 1 large egg
  • 1-2 teaspoons milk

Frosting:

  • 1/4 cup unsalted butter, at room temperature
  • 8 ounces cream cheese, chilled
  • 1-2 tablespoons coconut cream or full-fat canned coconut milk, plus additional (optional)
  • 1 teaspoon coconut extract
  • 1/2 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
  • 3-3 1/2 cups powdered sugar, plus additional (optional)

Toppings:

  • assorted fresh fruit
  • powdered sugar, for dusting (optional)

To make pastries: Heat oven to 400 F. Line baking sheet with parchment paper and set aside.

Place puff pastry sheet on lightly floured work surface and cut each sheet into 12 3-inch squares.

In small bowl, beat egg with milk to make egg wash and lightly brush onto each square.

Transfer pastries onto baking sheet and bake 10 minutes, until pastries have puffed up and are golden.

Cool completely on wire rack.

To make frosting: In stand mixer bowl fitted with flat beater, beat butter on medium speed until light and creamy, about 3 minutes.

Add cream cheese and beat until smooth and fully incorporated. Add coconut cream, coconut extract and vanilla extract, and beat until smooth.

Gently stir in powdered sugar until fully incorporated. Turn stand mixer on high and beat 1 minute, until fully combined. Add additional powdered sugar and coconut cream until desired consistency and level of sweetness is reached.

Spread or pipe coconut cream cheese frosting into middle.

Top with fresh fruit and another pastry square. Dust with powdered sugar, if desired.

Category: Kitchenaid  Tags: ,  Comments off

Panhandler’s Pizza to reopen in Fort Collins with new owners

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The storied pizzeria is vacated its original location in September.
Jacob Laxen

The storied Panhandler’s Pizza will live on in Fort Collins.

The trademarks and deep dish recipes of the 37-year-old pizzeria that closed on Sept. 24 have been sold to Tortilla Marissa’s co-owner and former Panhandler’s manager Louann DeCoursey.

She’s currently finalizing a lease for a new location in Midtown Fort Collins and is targeting a late November reopening.

“I couldn’t watch Panhandler’s go away,” said DeCoursey, a Fort Collins native and longtime patron of the pizzeria. “I know how much people love it. It is a piece of Fort Collins.”

DeCoursey has salvaged brick, wood and the fireplace mantle from the original 1220 W. Elizabeth St. Panhandler’s building in the Campus West development. She’s planning on keeping the same menu the restaurant has long been known for. 

More: Customers flock to Fort Collins’ Panhandler’s Pizza for last slices

“It’s been around for 37 years for a reason,” DeCoursey said. “You don’t mess with something that’s working.”

DeCoursey has owned the southwestern-themed Tortilla Marissa’s at 2635 S. College Ave. with her husband Mike Piotraschke since 2013.

Longtime Panhandler’s owner John Olson was told earlier this year that the original building had been sold and was about to become high-end student housing. He initially planned to keep the Panhandler’s tradition alive in a new building but later decided to retire.

More: On second thought, Panhandler’s owner decides to close

Olson said he was contacted by numerous parties interested in purchasing the restaurant. There was a spike business during the restaurant’s final weeks.

“It’s pretty exciting that the tradition will continue,” Olson said.

Steve and Pam Foster opened Panhandler’s Pizza in 1975. The original Panhandler’s pies, which were cooked in cast iron skillets that were also on display in the restaurant, were different than deep dish pies made in rectangular pans at Panhandler’s in recent decades.

Olson bought the store in March 1981, moving from Wisconsin where he had worked for a regional pizza chain called Rocky Rococo that still operates numerous stores.

Inspired by the menu at Rocky Rococo, Olson created the thick pastry-style dough that’s become Panhandler’s trademark. The Chicago-style sauce features tomatoes spiced with garlic, basil and oregano. Whole milk mozzarella is used as the main cheese.

Follow Jacob Laxen on Twitter and Instagram @jacoblaxen.

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Reno’s Stuart Smith placed third in the Senior PGA Professional …

 

Reno’s Stuart Smith placed third in the Senior PGA Professional Championship over the weekend, which earned him a spot in the KitchenAid Senior PGA Championship in May.

Smith, the director of golf at Somersett Golf Country Club, joined 34 other players in earning top spots at the 29th Senior PGA Professional Championship to advance to the 79th KitchenAid Senior PGA Championship on May 22-27, at Harbor Shores in Benton Harbor, Mich.

Smith finished with 76-71-67-68—282 (-6), placing third overall in the tournament at Desert Mountain in Scottsdale, Ariz.

“This was certainly a wonderful event. I always have high expectations and have been playing well of late. I played very good golf on the weekend and managed to come through unscathed from a few errant shots. Toss in a couple lucky breaks and some good putting from short distance led to 36 holes of bogey free golf on the weekend,” he said in a news release. “Third place is a great accomplishment for me. I’m anxious to get home to the family and our new clubhouse and get back to work.”

May’s tournament will be Smith’s fourth appearance in the Senior PGA Championship and his third at Harbor Shores. 

“It’s nice to have a couple carrots dangling out there for next season,” he said. “I am very excited to go back to Benton Harbor and for more good things to come.”

 

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Thame ‘food trail’ a success

People in Thame’s town centre on Saturday got a few extra treats, thanks to a Food Trail.

They got to sample food delicacies, drinks, and special offers put on for the day by town centre retailers.

Eighteen food and kitchen shops, cafes and pubs took part in the Trail, a new event organised by 21st Century Thame and sponsored by A Bell Co, Steamer Trading Cook Shop, Rumsey’s Chocolaterie, and the James Figg. 21st Century Thame produced a leaflet, handed out on the day by volunteers, with a map to guide people around the venues.

Places to visit on the Trail included Rumsey’s Chocolaterie, the Deli at No 5, AGA Thame, Umberto’s, the Cross Keys, Jack Alice, the Birdcage, What’s Cooking, Treacles Tea Rooms, and the Spread Eagle.

There were also displays of cookery books at the Book House and the Oxfam Bookshop, and live piano renditions of Elvis Presley numbers at the Coffee House.

The party atmosphere was enhanced by the Swervy World Band, entertaining everyone with music played on banjo, sousaphone, saxophone, percussion, plus vocals, right through the day.

Everyone taking part thought the Food Trail was a brilliant addition to town centre activities and had excellent feedback from the public.

Stephen Catherall of Steamer Trading Cook Shop said:

“We were really busy and thought the event in town perfectly complemented the Food Festival on the Showground, with the shuttle bus taking people between the two places.”

Cornfield Bakery also thought it was a great day, and their sourdough breads were eagerly devoured.

Dian Parker of A Bell Co said:

“It was a great idea, and we were delighted to have a visit from Linda Emery, Deputy Mayor, who enjoyed our tasty fruited tea bread baked in Miele ovens.”

Helen Johns of 21st Century Thame said:

“We have a fantastic variety of shops, restaurants, cafes, pubs and kitchen shops in Thame, and it was a pleasure to put together an event that showcased the fine food, wines, beers, and kitchen accessories they offer.

“We are very grateful for the support of our sponsors. The positive feedback suggests our Food Trail event will definitely not be the last!”

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