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November 5, 2017 |

Archive for » November 5th, 2017«

Changes a-comin’ to Open Class flower contest

Green thumbs around Fayette County will want to take note of some changes occurring with next year’s Open Class Flower competition at the Fayette County Free Fair.

Eva Stone, director of the Open Class Flower contest, announced this past week that there are some changes coming down the pike for the 2018 Fayette County Free Fair Open Class Flower event, with the hope that the advance notice lets those who participate get an advance start on planning their gardens for the event.

The biggest changes, per Stone, come in the arrangements categories. The theme for 2018 will be “Flowers of Beauty,” beginning with Class 27 Toolbox Bouquet, which will require an arrangement of flowers using an old toolbox as the container and accessories such as a hammer, nails, levels and other tools.

Class 28 will be “Blue Paradise,” which will require an arrangement of blue flowers in a vase, with white flowers as accessories. Class 29 will be “Wildflowers,” requiring an arrangement of various wildflowers in a kitchen container.

Class 30 will be “Basket of Succulents,” with the entrant’s choice of an arrangement of succulent plants in a decorative basket, while Class 31 will be “Herbs in a Box,” an arrangement of herbs in a 6 inch by 13 inch plastic or wood box.

“Red White or Blue” will be the theme of Class 32, with arrangements of red, white and blue flowers and the theme being the military, to include the use of flags, toy soldiers or other items; Class 33, meanwhile, will be “Truck Load of Flowers,” an arrangement of any type of flowers using a toy truck, with the flowers to fill the bed of the truck.

Among the final two categories will be Class 34, “Personal Choice,” which will ask entrants to use their favorite flowers, container and accessories for an arrangement.

And, finally, Class 35 will be “Tiny Treasurers,” where entrants will have to make an arrangement of small flowers in a small container, not exceeding 4 inches by 4 inches in finished size.

Other changes for 2018 will include a $25 award, courtesy of the Fayette County Master Gardeners, for the Open Class Flowers Grand Champion; Reserve Grand Champion to receive a flower arrangement from Rieman’s Flowers Shop; the champions of Divisions 3, 4, 5, 6 and 7 receiving one of the various items donated by Tractor Supply Company; the champions of sections 1 and 11 receiving $10 courtesy of the Fayette County Garden Club; and the reserve champions of sections 1 and 11 receiving ribbons only.

(Editor’s note: A prior version of this story included erroneously provided information regarding the changes to flower arrangements for 2018. This version has been revised with the correct information.)

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Amazon already has Black Friday deals


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The Amazon homepage is seen Nov. 5, 2017.


With 19 days to go until Black Friday, many retailers have launched sales — including Amazon.

Shoppers may visit Amazon.com or Amazon’s app, where they will find an “Explore Holiday” section on the homepage, and a “Countdown to Black Friday” section under that. Deals cover most departments, including kitchen, toys and games, computers and accessories, and more.

This year, Black Friday is Nov. 24. Deals on that date specifically have become less of a thing now that many retailers expand holiday shopping deals to the entire months of November and December.

Last year’s popular holiday shopping deals surrounded video game consoles such as the Xbox One S and PlayStation4 Pro, and this year’s will likely be no different. BFads.net, a Black Friday analysis and deals announcement website, predicts the Xbox One S consoles will be an even bigger deal as attention shifts to X Box One X Project Scorpio from Microsoft, coming out in early November.

Other deals BFAds.net says may happen this holiday shopping season include:
 Apple products, including the latest iPad, which released in March, and all the new products the company announced at a special event in late September.
• Televisions: These are usually the most-advertised deals each year at varying bog-box retailers, especially those luring shoppers on Thanksgiving Day
• Amazon devices of varying sorts, with an emphasis on becoming an Amazon Prime member to score the deals
• Google Home and Google Mini: Look for prices to compete with Amazon’s
• Home and kitchen items: Stores often fill their circular ads with these deals
• Toys: Standard Black Friday deal items; many toy sellers have already released their holiday catalogs

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Ferris eatery | Gramercy Kitchen | Mondrian Park Avenue


Get your news on the record. To submit company openings, moves or real estate deals, or to receive further information, email FTR@crainsnewyork.com or visit this page.


NEW IN TOWN

Ferris
44 W. 29th St.

The former executive chef of Le Turtle, on the Lower East Side, opened an American eatery inside the Made Hotel, in Chelsea.

Gramercy Kitchen
184 Third Ave.

The co-founders of TradingTable, an online purchasing platform for restaurants, have tweaked this former diner’s menu and name.

Intimissimi
601 Fifth Ave.

The Italian lingerie label opened its first U.S. store, in Midtown.

Madison Reed Color Bar
11 W. 18th St.

The San Francisco–based startup that makes at-home hair color products opened its first brick-and-mortar hair salon, in the Flatiron District. Prices start at $35.


MOVES AND EXPANSIONS

Mondrian Park Avenue
444 Park Ave. South

The luxury hotel chain introduced its second city-based location, in NoMad, with 189 guest rooms.

Next Models
15 Watts St.

The South Village modeling agency opened a men’s division. It has so far signed more than 60 models, musicians and actors.

Supreme
152 Grand St., Brooklyn

The skatewear brand with a store in SoHo opened a Williamsburg shop that has a giant built-in skate bowl.


BANKRUPTCIES

Maranatha Evangel Church
950 Van Duzer St., Staten Island

The church filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection Oct. 8 citing estimated assets of $500,001 to $1 million and liabilities of $100,001 to $500,000. Wendy Paniccioli is the creditor with the largest unsecured claim, owed $120,000.

SeamSpray Force Systems
108-02 Rockaway Beach Blvd., Queens

The pressure-washing company filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection Oct. 18. The filing cites estimated assets of $0 to $50,000 and liabilities of $100,001 to $500,000. The creditor with the largest unsecured claim is the Internal Revenue Service, owed $300,000.


REAL ESTATE


RETAIL

Arlee Home Fashions signed a lease for 15,805 square feet at 36 E. 31st St. to move its office and showroom. The household furnishings manufacturer plans to take the entire eighth floor and part of the seventh floor. Norman Bobrow Co. brokered the deal for the tenant. The landlord, Koeppel Rosen, was represented in-house. The asking rent for the 10-year lease was $56 per square foot.

NAPA Auto Parts signed a lease for 14,100 square feet at 1973 38th St., Queens. The auto parts store plans to use the space as a retail, wholesale and distribution facility. Katz Associates brokered the deal for the tenant. ABS Partners Real Estate represented the landlord,19-80 Steinway. The asking rent and lease duration were not disclosed.

Fu Da International renewed the lease on its 10,119-square-foot showroom at 525 Seventh Ave. The asking rent for the three-year deal was $60 per square foot. Savitt Partners represented the tenant, a wholesale clothing and accessories distributor. The landlord, Olmstead Properties, represented itself.

Weisman Enterprises agreed to take 7,750 square feet at 2375 Flatbush Ave., Brooklyn. The home- improvement brand that operates Weisman Home Outlets plans to open its fourth store. The asking rent and lease duration were not disclosed. The landlord, Maris Management, and the tenant were represented by M.C. O’Brien.

Christopher Wong, owner of Burger Inc. NYC, L.E.S. Kitchen and the Breakroom, will lease 2,450 square feet at 89 Greenwich Ave., where he plans to open a burger bar. The asking rent for the 15-year deal was $245 per square foot. Douglas Elliman Real Estate represented the landlord, 1 BK Street Corp. Sinvin Real Estate represented the tenant.


COMMERCIAL

The American Society for Composers, Authors and Publishers is planning to move its headquarters from1900 Broadway to 250 W. 57th St. The nonprofit signed a lease for 85,400 square feet over four floors. The asking rent was $67 per square foot for the 12th through 14th floors and $74 per square foot for the 20th floor. CBRE represented the tenant. The landlord, Empire State Realty Trust, was represented in-house and by Cushman Wakefield.

Squarespace agreed to take an additional 49,700 square feet at 225 Varick St. in Hudson Square The software company already occupies 93,000 square feet and plans to take two more floors. The asking rent for the 12-year deal was in the high $70s per square foot. CBRE represented the tenant and the landlords, Trinity Real Estate, Norges Bank Real Estate Management and Hines.

TheSkimm agreed to take 22,000 square feet at 50 W. 23rd St. The digital email newsletter company quadrupled the size of its former office across the street. The asking rent for the five-year sublease was in the mid-$60s per square foot. Colliers International represented the sublandlord, Grovo. Newmark Knight Frank brokered the deal for the subtenant.

GameChanger Media inked a deal for 16,906 square feet at 44 Wall St. The tech company, which runs a baseball and softball scorekeeping app, plans to relocate from 86 Chambers St. The asking rent was in the high $50s per square foot. Cushman Wakefield represented the tenant. The landlord, Equity Office, was represented in-house and by a team from CBRE.

Ferguson signed a 10-year lease for 13,263 square feet at 260 Furman St., Brooklyn. The Virginia-based plumbing wholesaler plans to open its second location in the borough. Commercial Retail Associates represented the tenant. CPEX Real Estate represented the landlord, RAL Cos.

Fujitsu America agreed to renew its 10,964-square-foot lease at 733 Third Ave. for 10 years. The Tokyo-based information technology equipment and services company has been a tenant in the building since 2004. The asking rent was $68 per square foot. Newmark Knight Frank represented the tenant. The landlord, the Durst Organization, was represented in-house. 

Bankruptcy filings from the eastern and southern districts of New York are listed alphabetically. Stock transactions are insider transactions at New York companies obtained from Thomson Reuters and listed by size. Real estate listings are in order of square footage.

Category: Accessories  Tags: ,  Comments off

Ferris eatery | Gramercy Kitchen | Mondrian Park Avenue


Get your news on the record. To submit company openings, moves or real estate deals, or to receive further information, email FTR@crainsnewyork.com or visit this page.


NEW IN TOWN

Ferris
44 W. 29th St.

The former executive chef of Le Turtle, on the Lower East Side, opened an American eatery inside the Made Hotel, in Chelsea.

Gramercy Kitchen
184 Third Ave.

The co-founders of TradingTable, an online purchasing platform for restaurants, have tweaked this former diner’s menu and name.

Intimissimi
601 Fifth Ave.

The Italian lingerie label opened its first U.S. store, in Midtown.

Madison Reed Color Bar
11 W. 18th St.

The San Francisco–based startup that makes at-home hair color products opened its first brick-and-mortar hair salon, in the Flatiron District. Prices start at $35.


MOVES AND EXPANSIONS

Mondrian Park Avenue
444 Park Ave. South

The luxury hotel chain introduced its second city-based location, in NoMad, with 189 guest rooms.

Next Models
15 Watts St.

The South Village modeling agency opened a men’s division. It has so far signed more than 60 models, musicians and actors.

Supreme
152 Grand St., Brooklyn

The skatewear brand with a store in SoHo opened a Williamsburg shop that has a giant built-in skate bowl.


BANKRUPTCIES

Maranatha Evangel Church
950 Van Duzer St., Staten Island

The church filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection Oct. 8 citing estimated assets of $500,001 to $1 million and liabilities of $100,001 to $500,000. Wendy Paniccioli is the creditor with the largest unsecured claim, owed $120,000.

SeamSpray Force Systems
108-02 Rockaway Beach Blvd., Queens

The pressure-washing company filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection Oct. 18. The filing cites estimated assets of $0 to $50,000 and liabilities of $100,001 to $500,000. The creditor with the largest unsecured claim is the Internal Revenue Service, owed $300,000.


REAL ESTATE


RETAIL

Arlee Home Fashions signed a lease for 15,805 square feet at 36 E. 31st St. to move its office and showroom. The household furnishings manufacturer plans to take the entire eighth floor and part of the seventh floor. Norman Bobrow Co. brokered the deal for the tenant. The landlord, Koeppel Rosen, was represented in-house. The asking rent for the 10-year lease was $56 per square foot.

NAPA Auto Parts signed a lease for 14,100 square feet at 1973 38th St., Queens. The auto parts store plans to use the space as a retail, wholesale and distribution facility. Katz Associates brokered the deal for the tenant. ABS Partners Real Estate represented the landlord,19-80 Steinway. The asking rent and lease duration were not disclosed.

Fu Da International renewed the lease on its 10,119-square-foot showroom at 525 Seventh Ave. The asking rent for the three-year deal was $60 per square foot. Savitt Partners represented the tenant, a wholesale clothing and accessories distributor. The landlord, Olmstead Properties, represented itself.

Weisman Enterprises agreed to take 7,750 square feet at 2375 Flatbush Ave., Brooklyn. The home- improvement brand that operates Weisman Home Outlets plans to open its fourth store. The asking rent and lease duration were not disclosed. The landlord, Maris Management, and the tenant were represented by M.C. O’Brien.

Christopher Wong, owner of Burger Inc. NYC, L.E.S. Kitchen and the Breakroom, will lease 2,450 square feet at 89 Greenwich Ave., where he plans to open a burger bar. The asking rent for the 15-year deal was $245 per square foot. Douglas Elliman Real Estate represented the landlord, 1 BK Street Corp. Sinvin Real Estate represented the tenant.


COMMERCIAL

The American Society for Composers, Authors and Publishers is planning to move its headquarters from1900 Broadway to 250 W. 57th St. The nonprofit signed a lease for 85,400 square feet over four floors. The asking rent was $67 per square foot for the 12th through 14th floors and $74 per square foot for the 20th floor. CBRE represented the tenant. The landlord, Empire State Realty Trust, was represented in-house and by Cushman Wakefield.

Squarespace agreed to take an additional 49,700 square feet at 225 Varick St. in Hudson Square The software company already occupies 93,000 square feet and plans to take two more floors. The asking rent for the 12-year deal was in the high $70s per square foot. CBRE represented the tenant and the landlords, Trinity Real Estate, Norges Bank Real Estate Management and Hines.

TheSkimm agreed to take 22,000 square feet at 50 W. 23rd St. The digital email newsletter company quadrupled the size of its former office across the street. The asking rent for the five-year sublease was in the mid-$60s per square foot. Colliers International represented the sublandlord, Grovo. Newmark Knight Frank brokered the deal for the subtenant.

GameChanger Media inked a deal for 16,906 square feet at 44 Wall St. The tech company, which runs a baseball and softball scorekeeping app, plans to relocate from 86 Chambers St. The asking rent was in the high $50s per square foot. Cushman Wakefield represented the tenant. The landlord, Equity Office, was represented in-house and by a team from CBRE.

Ferguson signed a 10-year lease for 13,263 square feet at 260 Furman St., Brooklyn. The Virginia-based plumbing wholesaler plans to open its second location in the borough. Commercial Retail Associates represented the tenant. CPEX Real Estate represented the landlord, RAL Cos.

Fujitsu America agreed to renew its 10,964-square-foot lease at 733 Third Ave. for 10 years. The Tokyo-based information technology equipment and services company has been a tenant in the building since 2004. The asking rent was $68 per square foot. Newmark Knight Frank represented the tenant. The landlord, the Durst Organization, was represented in-house. 

Bankruptcy filings from the eastern and southern districts of New York are listed alphabetically. Stock transactions are insider transactions at New York companies obtained from Thomson Reuters and listed by size. Real estate listings are in order of square footage.

Category: Accessories  Tags: ,  Comments off

Ferris eatery | Gramercy Kitchen | Mondrian Park Avenue


Get your news on the record. To submit company openings, moves or real estate deals, or to receive further information, email FTR@crainsnewyork.com or visit this page.


NEW IN TOWN

Ferris
44 W. 29th St.

The former executive chef of Le Turtle, on the Lower East Side, opened an American eatery inside the Made Hotel, in Chelsea.

Gramercy Kitchen
184 Third Ave.

The co-founders of TradingTable, an online purchasing platform for restaurants, have tweaked this former diner’s menu and name.

Intimissimi
601 Fifth Ave.

The Italian lingerie label opened its first U.S. store, in Midtown.

Madison Reed Color Bar
11 W. 18th St.

The San Francisco–based startup that makes at-home hair color products opened its first brick-and-mortar hair salon, in the Flatiron District. Prices start at $35.


MOVES AND EXPANSIONS

Mondrian Park Avenue
444 Park Ave. South

The luxury hotel chain introduced its second city-based location, in NoMad, with 189 guest rooms.

Next Models
15 Watts St.

The South Village modeling agency opened a men’s division. It has so far signed more than 60 models, musicians and actors.

Supreme
152 Grand St., Brooklyn

The skatewear brand with a store in SoHo opened a Williamsburg shop that has a giant built-in skate bowl.


BANKRUPTCIES

Maranatha Evangel Church
950 Van Duzer St., Staten Island

The church filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection Oct. 8 citing estimated assets of $500,001 to $1 million and liabilities of $100,001 to $500,000. Wendy Paniccioli is the creditor with the largest unsecured claim, owed $120,000.

SeamSpray Force Systems
108-02 Rockaway Beach Blvd., Queens

The pressure-washing company filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection Oct. 18. The filing cites estimated assets of $0 to $50,000 and liabilities of $100,001 to $500,000. The creditor with the largest unsecured claim is the Internal Revenue Service, owed $300,000.


REAL ESTATE


RETAIL

Arlee Home Fashions signed a lease for 15,805 square feet at 36 E. 31st St. to move its office and showroom. The household furnishings manufacturer plans to take the entire eighth floor and part of the seventh floor. Norman Bobrow Co. brokered the deal for the tenant. The landlord, Koeppel Rosen, was represented in-house. The asking rent for the 10-year lease was $56 per square foot.

NAPA Auto Parts signed a lease for 14,100 square feet at 1973 38th St., Queens. The auto parts store plans to use the space as a retail, wholesale and distribution facility. Katz Associates brokered the deal for the tenant. ABS Partners Real Estate represented the landlord,19-80 Steinway. The asking rent and lease duration were not disclosed.

Fu Da International renewed the lease on its 10,119-square-foot showroom at 525 Seventh Ave. The asking rent for the three-year deal was $60 per square foot. Savitt Partners represented the tenant, a wholesale clothing and accessories distributor. The landlord, Olmstead Properties, represented itself.

Weisman Enterprises agreed to take 7,750 square feet at 2375 Flatbush Ave., Brooklyn. The home- improvement brand that operates Weisman Home Outlets plans to open its fourth store. The asking rent and lease duration were not disclosed. The landlord, Maris Management, and the tenant were represented by M.C. O’Brien.

Christopher Wong, owner of Burger Inc. NYC, L.E.S. Kitchen and the Breakroom, will lease 2,450 square feet at 89 Greenwich Ave., where he plans to open a burger bar. The asking rent for the 15-year deal was $245 per square foot. Douglas Elliman Real Estate represented the landlord, 1 BK Street Corp. Sinvin Real Estate represented the tenant.


COMMERCIAL

The American Society for Composers, Authors and Publishers is planning to move its headquarters from1900 Broadway to 250 W. 57th St. The nonprofit signed a lease for 85,400 square feet over four floors. The asking rent was $67 per square foot for the 12th through 14th floors and $74 per square foot for the 20th floor. CBRE represented the tenant. The landlord, Empire State Realty Trust, was represented in-house and by Cushman Wakefield.

Squarespace agreed to take an additional 49,700 square feet at 225 Varick St. in Hudson Square The software company already occupies 93,000 square feet and plans to take two more floors. The asking rent for the 12-year deal was in the high $70s per square foot. CBRE represented the tenant and the landlords, Trinity Real Estate, Norges Bank Real Estate Management and Hines.

TheSkimm agreed to take 22,000 square feet at 50 W. 23rd St. The digital email newsletter company quadrupled the size of its former office across the street. The asking rent for the five-year sublease was in the mid-$60s per square foot. Colliers International represented the sublandlord, Grovo. Newmark Knight Frank brokered the deal for the subtenant.

GameChanger Media inked a deal for 16,906 square feet at 44 Wall St. The tech company, which runs a baseball and softball scorekeeping app, plans to relocate from 86 Chambers St. The asking rent was in the high $50s per square foot. Cushman Wakefield represented the tenant. The landlord, Equity Office, was represented in-house and by a team from CBRE.

Ferguson signed a 10-year lease for 13,263 square feet at 260 Furman St., Brooklyn. The Virginia-based plumbing wholesaler plans to open its second location in the borough. Commercial Retail Associates represented the tenant. CPEX Real Estate represented the landlord, RAL Cos.

Fujitsu America agreed to renew its 10,964-square-foot lease at 733 Third Ave. for 10 years. The Tokyo-based information technology equipment and services company has been a tenant in the building since 2004. The asking rent was $68 per square foot. Newmark Knight Frank represented the tenant. The landlord, the Durst Organization, was represented in-house. 

Bankruptcy filings from the eastern and southern districts of New York are listed alphabetically. Stock transactions are insider transactions at New York companies obtained from Thomson Reuters and listed by size. Real estate listings are in order of square footage.

Category: Accessories  Tags: ,  Comments off

Ferris eatery | Gramercy Kitchen | Mondrian Park Avenue


Get your news on the record. To submit company openings, moves or real estate deals, or to receive further information, email FTR@crainsnewyork.com or visit this page.


NEW IN TOWN

Ferris
44 W. 29th St.

The former executive chef of Le Turtle, on the Lower East Side, opened an American eatery inside the Made Hotel, in Chelsea.

Gramercy Kitchen
184 Third Ave.

The co-founders of TradingTable, an online purchasing platform for restaurants, have tweaked this former diner’s menu and name.

Intimissimi
601 Fifth Ave.

The Italian lingerie label opened its first U.S. store, in Midtown.

Madison Reed Color Bar
11 W. 18th St.

The San Francisco–based startup that makes at-home hair color products opened its first brick-and-mortar hair salon, in the Flatiron District. Prices start at $35.


MOVES AND EXPANSIONS

Mondrian Park Avenue
444 Park Ave. South

The luxury hotel chain introduced its second city-based location, in NoMad, with 189 guest rooms.

Next Models
15 Watts St.

The South Village modeling agency opened a men’s division. It has so far signed more than 60 models, musicians and actors.

Supreme
152 Grand St., Brooklyn

The skatewear brand with a store in SoHo opened a Williamsburg shop that has a giant built-in skate bowl.


BANKRUPTCIES

Maranatha Evangel Church
950 Van Duzer St., Staten Island

The church filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection Oct. 8 citing estimated assets of $500,001 to $1 million and liabilities of $100,001 to $500,000. Wendy Paniccioli is the creditor with the largest unsecured claim, owed $120,000.

SeamSpray Force Systems
108-02 Rockaway Beach Blvd., Queens

The pressure-washing company filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection Oct. 18. The filing cites estimated assets of $0 to $50,000 and liabilities of $100,001 to $500,000. The creditor with the largest unsecured claim is the Internal Revenue Service, owed $300,000.


REAL ESTATE


RETAIL

Arlee Home Fashions signed a lease for 15,805 square feet at 36 E. 31st St. to move its office and showroom. The household furnishings manufacturer plans to take the entire eighth floor and part of the seventh floor. Norman Bobrow Co. brokered the deal for the tenant. The landlord, Koeppel Rosen, was represented in-house. The asking rent for the 10-year lease was $56 per square foot.

NAPA Auto Parts signed a lease for 14,100 square feet at 1973 38th St., Queens. The auto parts store plans to use the space as a retail, wholesale and distribution facility. Katz Associates brokered the deal for the tenant. ABS Partners Real Estate represented the landlord,19-80 Steinway. The asking rent and lease duration were not disclosed.

Fu Da International renewed the lease on its 10,119-square-foot showroom at 525 Seventh Ave. The asking rent for the three-year deal was $60 per square foot. Savitt Partners represented the tenant, a wholesale clothing and accessories distributor. The landlord, Olmstead Properties, represented itself.

Weisman Enterprises agreed to take 7,750 square feet at 2375 Flatbush Ave., Brooklyn. The home- improvement brand that operates Weisman Home Outlets plans to open its fourth store. The asking rent and lease duration were not disclosed. The landlord, Maris Management, and the tenant were represented by M.C. O’Brien.

Christopher Wong, owner of Burger Inc. NYC, L.E.S. Kitchen and the Breakroom, will lease 2,450 square feet at 89 Greenwich Ave., where he plans to open a burger bar. The asking rent for the 15-year deal was $245 per square foot. Douglas Elliman Real Estate represented the landlord, 1 BK Street Corp. Sinvin Real Estate represented the tenant.


COMMERCIAL

The American Society for Composers, Authors and Publishers is planning to move its headquarters from1900 Broadway to 250 W. 57th St. The nonprofit signed a lease for 85,400 square feet over four floors. The asking rent was $67 per square foot for the 12th through 14th floors and $74 per square foot for the 20th floor. CBRE represented the tenant. The landlord, Empire State Realty Trust, was represented in-house and by Cushman Wakefield.

Squarespace agreed to take an additional 49,700 square feet at 225 Varick St. in Hudson Square The software company already occupies 93,000 square feet and plans to take two more floors. The asking rent for the 12-year deal was in the high $70s per square foot. CBRE represented the tenant and the landlords, Trinity Real Estate, Norges Bank Real Estate Management and Hines.

TheSkimm agreed to take 22,000 square feet at 50 W. 23rd St. The digital email newsletter company quadrupled the size of its former office across the street. The asking rent for the five-year sublease was in the mid-$60s per square foot. Colliers International represented the sublandlord, Grovo. Newmark Knight Frank brokered the deal for the subtenant.

GameChanger Media inked a deal for 16,906 square feet at 44 Wall St. The tech company, which runs a baseball and softball scorekeeping app, plans to relocate from 86 Chambers St. The asking rent was in the high $50s per square foot. Cushman Wakefield represented the tenant. The landlord, Equity Office, was represented in-house and by a team from CBRE.

Ferguson signed a 10-year lease for 13,263 square feet at 260 Furman St., Brooklyn. The Virginia-based plumbing wholesaler plans to open its second location in the borough. Commercial Retail Associates represented the tenant. CPEX Real Estate represented the landlord, RAL Cos.

Fujitsu America agreed to renew its 10,964-square-foot lease at 733 Third Ave. for 10 years. The Tokyo-based information technology equipment and services company has been a tenant in the building since 2004. The asking rent was $68 per square foot. Newmark Knight Frank represented the tenant. The landlord, the Durst Organization, was represented in-house. 

Bankruptcy filings from the eastern and southern districts of New York are listed alphabetically. Stock transactions are insider transactions at New York companies obtained from Thomson Reuters and listed by size. Real estate listings are in order of square footage.

Category: Accessories  Tags: ,  Comments off

The Physics Experience

MADISON, Wis. (WMTV)– How can you have heat without fire? It’s not magic, it’s science. Specifically, the science of induction, where strong electric fields can create heat. Induction cook tops use this to heat food without any flames or direct heat, cooking more efficiently than their gas or conventional electric cousins. And this lack of direct heat makes them safer, too: you can even put paper between an induction cook top and a pan, and it won’t catch light.

They create heat in the base of the cookware.s quicker. They are also easier to clean, because the flat glass or ceramic surface has no gaps or grills to collect spilled food, and the food doesn’t get burned onto the surface. If you spill something, one quick swipe with a damp cloth will clean it up. They are also quicker to control and more precise, again because the heat is generated inside the cookware, and so react quicker when you turn the dial up or down.

So why aren’t they more common? It’s partly a comfort thing; most US consumers don’t like them because they grew up on gas rings. Samsung has recently introduced an interesting solution to this problem: a cook top that projects an LED flame that shows the ring is on , and indicates the heating level. Induction cook tops are also more expensive, because they are more complex than the more common gas type.

But the main issue is with which cookware you can use with them. Because of the way they work, many types of pans just don’t heat up with induction cook tops. If you have copper bottom, glass or aluminum pans, they don’t get hot when you put them on an induction cook top.

How they work:
Induction cook tops use one of the odd quirks of electromagnetism: if you put certain materials into a rapidly alternating magnetic field, the material absorbs the energy and heats up. That’s because the field creates electrical currents inside the material, and the resistance of the material converts this electrical energy into heat, which is transferred to the food inside the pan.

Right underneath the cooking area of an induction cooktop is a tight spiral of cables, usually made of copper. The cooktop controller pushes an alternating current through this coil, which changes direction usually 20 to 30 times a second. This current flow creates a magnetic field above the coil. As the current alternates back and forth, the magnetic field does the same. If you put a pan on the surface (so it is just above the coil), this magnetic field induces (hence the name) an electrical current in the metal base of the pan. As the magnetic field alternates, this current flows back and forth (which is why it is often called an eddy current, as it swirls around like an eddy in a river). The metal resists this flow, and, like an electric heater, creates heat, which is conducted into the food through the metal of the pan. If you want to gently heat the food, the cook top pumps a lower current through the coil, so the cookware generates less heat, and the food warms slower.

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