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March 5, 2018 |

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CHANGE IT UP! Lively looks for home décor | Get Out | gvnews.com

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An Instruction Book on Six Basics of Cooking

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Jennifer Clair’s “Six Basic Cooking Techniques: Culinary Essentials for the Home Cook” uses straightforward text and photos.

Credit
Tony Cenicola/The New York Times

Jennifer Clair, who has taught small hands-on cooking classes in Manhattan since 2002, has assembled some essential lessons in a book. “Six Basic Cooking Techniques” uses straightforward text and photos to cover knife skills, meat cookery, pan sauces, roasting vegetables, blanching vegetables and preparing leafy greens. Each section gives a handful of recipes, mostly simple and very sound, and advice on equipment. But I was surprised that she does not mention cast iron as an option for skillets: “Six Basic Cooking Techniques: Culinary Essentials for the Home Cook” (HCNY Press, $19.95), homecookingny.com.

Follow NYT Food on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter and Pinterest. Get regular updates from NYT Cooking, with recipe suggestions, cooking tips and shopping advice.

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Kitchen area makeover: 7 steps to transform any room

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Parties, like the one my husband DC and I hosted last week, have many upsides: You meet interesting people. You help a cause. And you get a kick in the derriere to do those home improvements you’ve put off until the return of Halley’s Comet.

Story by

Marni Jameson

Special to NOLA.com|The Times-Picayune

All to say, for my newly redecorated kitchen eating area, I have the Orlando Philharmonic to thank.

Let me back up. Last December I ended a column with this line: “My new philosophy: care less. Entertain more. You only get now once.”

Before redecorating: The kitchen breakfast area did not show the room off to its full advantage. Furniture was not to scale. The wall art and area rug were too small, and the space lacked color.  

So, when a friend asked me if I would host a party to support our city’s philharmonic, a shindig for what turned out to be a mere 70 people in the home my husband and I had moved into just three months ago, I could not refuse. I was a victim of the press. My own press.

After my heart stopped defibrillating, I quickly converted panic into productivity and capitalized on the opportunity to make a dent in our home-improvement list.

The thought of all those cultured people in our home motivated DC, too, to join me in wrangling a dozen or so suddenly urgent tasks to the ground in just a few short weeks.

Fortunately, just for emergencies like this, I have my home improvement to-do list. Actually, my list has lists, one for each room, which I keep in a little book, which is never far from hand. So — folks, are you listening — when the time is right, and Mars is out of retrograde, and the stock market is up, and the Visa bill hasn’t yet come in, or you’re hosting a party, you can spring into action.

After redecorating: More color, to-scale furniture, bold art and drapery panels add softness, texture and pattern, helping this room realize its potential.  

As DC will confirm, I am always just one green light away from becoming a decorating dervish.

I pulled out my book of lists and consulted with DC. After some minor negotiations, we agreed on which projects to go for.

Finishing the kitchen eating area was clearly a priority because that’s where every party ends up. Plus, this was low-hanging fruit. We were halfway there.

When DC and I first toured the Happier Yellow House that became ours last fall, among the many features I loved was the sunny dining area. Though obviously under decorated, the room had loads of promise. (As I often remind DC, a room can be furnished but not decorated.)

However, as you and I both know, seeing a room’s potential and getting there is like wanting to run a marathon and crossing the finish line. To do either requires energy, determination, motivation and sweat. With a goal in mind, a list in hand, and the party as my finish line, the race was on.

When facing a room you want to redecorate, follow these seven steps, as we did with our kitchen eating area, and watch your dream room come true.

Start with the end in mind: Have a vision so you know where you’re going before you start. Don’t wing it. Then make your to-do list.

Focus on the assets: Look at what the room has going for it and doesn’t. Our 10-by-13-foot eating area had good proportions, great natural light and solid hardwood floors. All of that was important because they are tough to change. It also had handsome plantation shutters and a decent light fixture that needed new shades. We needed to add color, furniture that fit, softness and texture, art and accessories.

Fix surfaces first: Start from the floor and walls and move in. Before we moved in last November, we refinished the wood floors, taking them from aged yellow oak, to matte, mid-tone brown. We painted the walls a creamy yellow (Sherwin-Williams Belvedere Cream) and hung colorful artwork. We stopped there, stalled on second base, and might have stayed stuck, but for the party. 

Figure out furnishings: Before you buy furniture, create a floor plan, use painters tape to outline where pieces will go and select pieces that are the right scale. Because everything in the room was square, I wanted a round dining table to soften the edges. Given the volume and shape of this room, a 60-inch round table was the ideal fit.

Find your color palette: Following the common design maxim that every room needs a touch of black, I repainted my well-used brown wooden kitchen chairs black, which anchored the pale yellow walls and light wood furniture. I added black, chunky drapery hardware and pulled in drapery fabric to add pattern and color.

Finish your windows: Not every window needs a treatment, and for many, handsome blinds or shutters are enough. However, because this room had only hard finishes, adding a pair of stationary drapery panels gave the room much-needed color, softness and texture.

Follow with accessories: Artwork, greenery and other accent pieces are a room’s finishing touch.

Now to make sure you get it done, host a party.

Join me next week to find out how to make your home office reflect your life — in the best sense.

Syndicated columnist Marni Jameson is the author of three home and lifestyle books. Reach her at marnijameson.com.

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You Need Two Types of Frying Pans. Let an Expert Tell You Why

A few weekends ago, I sat and watched my friend Heather prepare breakfast for a host of other friends, with plans to make, among other things, hashbrowns. I watched her shred potatoes into beautiful little strings. Then, as we approached cooking time, she pulled a hefty non-stick pan from a cabinet under the sink.

Somewhere, cooking professionals, instructors, an armada of angry internet commenters and one Jake Kalick cried out in pain.

Kalick — co-founder of direct-to-consumer cookware company Made In — is intent on prying non-stick pans from the clutches of ‘one pan, one love’-types. His position is simple: “You can’t only use stainless steel or only use non-stick and expect the good results. They’re made with entirely different purposes in mind.”

Those purposes are spelled out in the very anatomy of the two pieces. If you were to take a microscope and zoom in on a stainless steel pan, or really any pan that isn’t non-stick, you’d see multitudes of tiny crevasses. When the pan is heated those crevasses expand and are filled by cooking oil and the food itself, making that food solidify and begin to grab hold of the pan. During the cooking process, the food itself will shrink, releasing it from the pan.

Conversely, a non-stick coating shields the food from those crevasse-ridden, heat-warping surfaces, and thereby allows it to move freely around the cooking area. This is the source of the magic that is watching your fried eggs gracefully slide around a non-stick cooking surface. It’s also why a non-stick cooking surface will fail to create a quality Maillard reaction in your cooking. The coating significantly lowers the R-value of the pan, making it lose heat dramatically when you put anything in it. The result is a surface too low-temp to dehydrate excess moisture from food.

This is not to say non-stick skillets are without place or purpose. For one, they allow for little to no oil or butter, lowering fat and calorie intake in a very real way. You can also throw easy cleanup to non-stick, as its very nature makes a rinse and wipe the most you’ll have to do. Certain foods also lend themselves to the cooking surface; Kalick provides the following suggestion: any delicate fish (think flounder or rainbow trout), egg dish that asks the egg to come out cleanly, crepe, pancake or food where a browning is not the desired outcome. All other foods, however, should have you reaching for stainless steel.

Variation between the two surfaces becomes greater the more you dive into the cookware industry. Cooking experiences change depending on the ply count, material type and quality of the metal-sourcing from company to company.

Made In uses a five-ply pan design (ply meaning layer) that creates what amounts to a metal sandwich. The top and bottom are both stainless steel, providing a non-reactive cooking surface, the trademark shiny look, but rather below-average heat conductivity. The second and fourth layer are aluminum, a fairly popular cookware material in its own right, which solves the steel’s problem by heating the pan faster by way of higher thermal conductivity. The middle layer is aluminum alloy, bringing more thermal conductivity (other companies may use all steel, or up the ante and use a copper core, like much of All-Clad’s cookware). Made In’s non-stick pieces are made in this same method, with a proprietary non-stick treatment applied to the cooking surface at the end.

“Home cooks are more educated than ever, with people spending $25 on grass-fed steaks at butchers and shopping for produce at Whole Foods and farmers markets,” Kalick says, “but there’s still this knowledge gap of not always using the best tools for the job, so that is the job, get people to that next step of understanding the tools of the trade.”

A cook is as only as good as his or her knowledge and, by extension, the gear they employ. By this point, if your knowledge leads you to cook hash browns in a non-stick pan, consider yourself early in your culinary journey. At the end of the day, nobody is clamoring for a damp mess of shredded potato.

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Are Jucy camper vans worth the effort?

New Zealand-based company Jucy converts minivans into camping vans. The backseat is turned into a versatile lounging and sleeping area and a kitchen is installed in the trunk. We tested one out on a camping trip in Big Sur.


Media: Alix Martichoux / SFGATE



You’ve probably seen one of these vans before. They’re pretty hard to miss.

New Zealand-based car rental company Jucy takes Dodge Grand Caravan minivans, paints them bright green and purple, takes out a row of seats, installs kitchens, and puts pop-up tents on the roofs. The effect is that of a miniature RV. The flashy slogans on the exterior of each car hint at what’s inside: “This Jucy RV comes with everything…including the kitchen sink.”

The branding promises an adventurous road trip without the hassle of pitching a tent and cooking over a campfire. It also gives a taste of the #vanlife lifestyle trend that’s tempting millennials away from stable jobs and mortgages in favor of flexibility, lower costs of living and adventure. Many young people are converting vans into makeshift mobile homes and hitting the road, telecommuting or working odd jobs along the way. (The hashtag has been used more than 2.6 million times on Instagram, the preferred platform for showing off one’s mobile way of life.)

I was curious if Jucy vans were really as turnkey as advertised, so my boyfriend, Nick, and I tested one out during a camping trip on the coast this winter. We planned to head 170 miles from Oakland down Highway 1 and camp on the Central Coast for a night.

While there were some hiccups along the way, I was genuinely surprised by how enjoyable camping in a Jucy van was — tacky branding aside. Here’s what you can expect if you decide to dip your toes into #vanlife with a similar rental for a few nights.


  • We tried out one of the vans by taking it on a camping trip in Big Sur. Photo: Alix Martichoux / SFGATE

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We tried out one of the vans by taking it on a camping trip in Big Sur.

We tried out one of the vans by taking it on a camping trip in Big Sur.

Photo: Alix Martichoux / SFGATE


People are taking Jucy vans all over the country. Here, a van parked in front of Cathedral Rock in Sedona, Arizona.

People are taking Jucy vans all over the country. Here, a van parked in front of Cathedral Rock in Sedona, Arizona.

Photo: Courtesy Jucy RV Rentals



The writing on the outside hints at what’s hidden in the trunk.

The writing on the outside hints at what’s hidden in the trunk.

Photo: Alix Martichoux / SFGATE




Juliana Linder and Richmond Hollen sit in their renovated Freightliner Sprinter van, along with their dog, Roscoe.

Scroll through the slideshow to view more photos of their travels and read more on their experiences of living in a van. 

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Juliana Linder and Richmond Hollen sit in their renovated Freightliner Sprinter van, along with their dog, Roscoe.

Scroll through the slideshow to view more photos of their travels and read more on their

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Photo: Courtesy Juliana Linder


Q: You have 128,000 followers on Instagram. What do you think is the attraction to following your adventures?

A: Everyone follows for different reasons. Some people just want to see Roscoe! Others are interested in the build, others in the destinations. It’s such a mixed bag, everyone projects their own desires onto our photos. It’s amazing what you’ll project onto a single photo when you have nothing more than just that visual information! Strangers make all kinds of assumptions about us, even though we put out (what we think to be) enough content telling it like it is.

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Q: You have 128,000 followers on Instagram. What do you think is the attraction to following your adventures?

A: Everyone follows for different reasons. Some people just want to see Roscoe! Others are interested

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Photo: Photos Are Courtesy Juliana Linder


(Answer, continued) Generally it seems that people have enjoyed our honesty and seeing how we’ve adapted to this lifestyle. A lot of comments we get are supportive, and they let us know that they are excited to see what’s next. That’s kind of what motivated us to continue posting in the very beginning. There was a lot of interest in our build out of the van. And we’d really like to help others get to the same point that we’ve gotten to, if we can, so we’re happy to do it.

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(Answer, continued) Generally it seems that people have enjoyed our honesty and seeing how we’ve adapted to this lifestyle. A lot of comments we get are supportive, and they let us know that they are excited to

… more
Photo: Photos Are Courtesy Juliana Linder


Linder and Hollen’s bed is placed on a mechanical lift, allowing the couple to raise or lower the mattress to create a space below. It is one of the van’s more unique features, and they plan to install another lift in their new van.

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Linder and Hollen’s bed is placed on a mechanical lift, allowing the couple to raise or lower the mattress to create a space below. It is one of the van’s more unique features, and they plan to install another

… more
Photo: Photos Are Courtesy Juliana Linder


Q: What are the reactions from strangers — and Bay Area folks — to your decision of living in a van?

A: A lot of strangers think it’s really cool and are excited to see the van. A lot of Bay Area folks were excited about it, and we found that a lot of them wanted to do similar things. We personally felt the need to take some time, similar to a sabbatical, to have an adventure and get the most out of life. A lot of people seem to relate to that feeling.

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Q: What are the reactions from strangers — and Bay Area folks — to your decision of living in a van?

A: A lot of strangers think it’s really cool and are excited to see the van. A lot of Bay Area folks were

… more
Photo: Photos Are Courtesy Juliana Linder


Q: Do either of you ever miss having an apartment?

A: As far as features go, we miss having an oven! But we’ll be installing a Dometic Cooktop stove/oven combo in our new van, which we’re excited about.

Q: Do either of you ever miss having an apartment?

A: As far as features go, we miss having an oven! But we’ll be installing a Dometic Cooktop stove/oven combo in our new van, which we’re excited about.

Photo: Photos Are Courtesy Juliana Linder


(Answer, continued) Oh, and a toilet/shower accessible at all times would be nice too. But we’ve gotten by without them for this long!

(Answer, continued) Oh, and a toilet/shower accessible at all times would be nice too. But we’ve gotten by without them for this long!

Photo: Photos Are Courtesy Juliana Linder



Q: What is the easiest part about living in a van?

A: We were initially really surprised by the ease with which we got acclimated to daily life in the van. It really felt like exactly where we were meant to be. And we were both really nervous about the transition beforehand so it was a relief to feel that way.

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Q: What is the easiest part about living in a van?

A: We were initially really surprised by the ease with which we got acclimated to daily life in the van. It really felt like exactly where we were meant to be.

… more
Photo: Photos Are Courtesy Juliana Linder


(Answer, continued) By far the easiest part for both of us was having all of our things with us at all times. It really simplified our life not having to worry about things all the time, where they were, if we had them on hand or not.

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(Answer, continued) By far the easiest part for both of us was having all of our things with us at all times. It really simplified our life not having to worry about things all the time, where they were, if we

… more
Photo: Photos Are Courtesy Juliana Linder


(Answer, continued) Life instantly became a lot simpler, just having less, and we noticed an increase in our happiness as a result. Literally a huge weight lifted off of us! Every so often we go through the van and see what more we can give away that hasn’t been used.

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(Answer, continued) Life instantly became a lot simpler, just having less, and we noticed an increase in our happiness as a result. Literally a huge weight lifted off of us! Every so often we go through the van

… more
Photo: Photos Are Courtesy Juliana Linder


Linder captured a photo of the streets of Todos Santos in Mexico, while on a yearlong trip down the West Coast.

Linder captured a photo of the streets of Todos Santos in Mexico, while on a yearlong trip down the West Coast.

Photo: Photos Are Courtesy Juliana Linder


Q: Is there a point when you both will return to living in a house/apartment?

A: For us, living in a van isn’t forever. We never intended for that to happen. Right now, it’s really just 1) our chosen lifestyle (we like not having much stuff and using less resources) and 2) a means to an end. We fully plan on taking advantage of our low costs (no rent) and lack of need for things, by saving as much money as we can.

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Q: Is there a point when you both will return to living in a house/apartment?

A: For us, living in a van isn’t forever. We never intended for that to happen. Right now, it’s really just 1) our chosen lifestyle

… more
Photo: Photos Are Courtesy Juliana Linder


(Answer, continued) With that money, our plan is to buy some land, and build a small house off-the-grid. We want to port over all of what we’ve learned living in the van and put it into practice. Even during this adjustment period, we want to have a safe and comfortable place to live and will be looking to rent a parking spot.

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(Answer, continued) With that money, our plan is to buy some land, and build a small house off-the-grid. We want to port over all of what we’ve learned living in the van and put it into practice. Even during

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Photo: Photos Are Courtesy Juliana Linder


(Answer, continued) We definitely want to put roots down, we value our time with loved ones most and it’s tough when you’re constantly moving. But we still love to travel and learn, so we’ll always be doing that no matter if we live in the van full-time or not. We’ll always be looking to strike a healthy balance there.

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(Answer, continued) We definitely want to put roots down, we value our time with loved ones most and it’s tough when you’re constantly moving. But we still love to travel and learn, so we’ll always be doing

… more
Photo: Photos Are Courtesy Juliana Linder


A memento of the couple’s travels, in needlepoint form.

A memento of the couple’s travels, in needlepoint form.

Photo: Photos Are Courtesy Juliana Linder


Linder and Hollen started their trip in British Columbia in March 2016, driving all the way down to Baja.

Linder and Hollen started their trip in British Columbia in March 2016, driving all the way down to Baja.

Photo: Photos Are Courtesy Juliana Linder


A view of the inside of the Sprinter van, with the white framing of the mechanical bed lift shown.

A view of the inside of the Sprinter van, with the white framing of the mechanical bed lift shown.

Photo: Photos Are Courtesy Juliana Linder


Linder and Hollen are now documenting the changes to their new van, a Ford Transit, which they are working on in Oregon.

Linder and Hollen are now documenting the changes to their new van, a Ford Transit, which they are working on in Oregon.

Photo: Photos Are Courtesy Juliana Linder


The plan is to build out a van that Hollen could finally stand up in; the couple says that the new van is taller than their previous Sprinter, which they used on the trip to Mexico.

The plan is to build out a van that Hollen could finally stand up in; the couple says that the new van is taller than their previous Sprinter, which they used on the trip to Mexico.

Photo: Photos Are Courtesy Juliana Linder


Linder and Hollen’s van can be seen in the background as their dog Roscoe takes a break outside the Sprinter.

Linder and Hollen’s van can be seen in the background as their dog Roscoe takes a break outside the Sprinter.

Photo: Photos Are Courtesy Juliana Linder


A view of the Sprinter van on the beach, complete with an awning attached to the right side.

A view of the Sprinter van on the beach, complete with an awning attached to the right side.

Photo: Photos Are Courtesy Juliana Linder


Another shot of the interior of the van, along with storage options attached to the wood-lined doors.

Another shot of the interior of the van, along with storage options attached to the wood-lined doors.

Photo: Photos Are Courtesy Juliana Linder


A recent photograph showing off a detour in Oregon, where the couple is now staying while they fix up their new van.

A recent photograph showing off a detour in Oregon, where the couple is now staying while they fix up their new van.

Photo: Photos Are Courtesy Juliana Linder


Linder and Roscoe sit in the new van’s swivel seats, as the couple continues to build out their car.

Linder and Roscoe sit in the new van’s swivel seats, as the couple continues to build out their car.

Photo: Photos Are Courtesy Juliana Linder




Getting started

We picked up the van from the company’s “San Francisco location,” which is actually in San Leandro, about three miles east of the Oakland Airport. We signed the paperwork, paid, and got the quick-and-dirty overview of the van from a staffer.

The driver’s seat and passenger side look like those of a normal car, but just about everything else had been modified. The middle row of seats was gone, allowing the back of the van to serve as a seating area, dining area, or bed.

When you pop the trunk, you’ll find a kitchenette installed in the rear with a small counter space above an array of drawers and cabinets. One drawer opens to a mini-fridge; another pulls out to reveal a gas burner. A sink you have to pump to operate sits on top of the counter. There’s a pop-up tent mounted on the roof that can serve as a bed for another two people.




The rear of Jucy vans unfolds into a kitchenette. Photo: Courtesy Jucy RV Rentals



Jucy typically requires a three-night minimum rental, but my boss wasn’t keen on springing for a full-on vacation, so the company made an exception for us.

After about 40 minutes of set-up and orientation, we were off.

On the road

Driving took some getting used to. The Grand Caravan is a lot larger than our Prius, but it’s not any harder to maneuver than your standard minivan.

A second car battery powers the mini-fridge and lights and allows you to charge your devices when the engine is off. Which leads me to the first major hiccup of the trip: the charging ports are USB only, meaning we couldn’t charge our camera or Nick’s phone (a Google Pixel, which is too futuristic for its own good with a USB-C hookup).

As we wound down Highway 17 through the Santa Cruz Mountains, my boyfriend and I postulated whether we would do this again soon. Then, during a pit-stop in Capitola, I became self-conscious: Was everyone staring at us? By the time we parked in downtown Monterey for lunch, it was clear that yes, everyone was gawking at our garish clown car.

Mostly unbothered by the extra attention, we took our time heading south on Highway 1, frequently pulling over for photo ops (and to let faster drivers pass). We arrived at our campsite at Limekiln State Park just in time to catch the sunset.

Meeting a vanlifer

To be clear, I have no idea what I’m doing when it comes to camping. Case in point: I accidentally reserved a “tent only” campsite that didn’t allow for RVs. I thought because the Jucy van was technically a minivan that it would be OK. I was wrong.

Luckily, the staff at Limekiln squeezed us into a spot near another van camper — who was more like a van-lifer — named Michael, who lives out of his converted cargo van full time.

“It’s the bitchingest lifestyle ever,” Michael said. “I wouldn’t do anything else.”

We chatted with him as we popped the trunk and started to make dinner. That’s when we realized we had forgotten a few things. The van comes with basic cookware — pots, pans, bowls, even a colander. We brought ravioli, sauce and a salad mix, but we didn’t bring a sponge or dish soap to clean up after ourselves. We also forgot a garbage bag, so we had to keep running to the shared trash cans down the hill.

At one point, Nick reached into a compartment for a slotted spoon and pulled out a sharp, unsheathed butcher knife. He breathed a sigh of relief, realizing he barely avoided slicing his hand. It was then we realized we were also missing a first aid kit (the vans don’t include them).

We unfolded a table tucked away in the backseat to convert the area into a dining room where we could enjoy our dinner.




Jucy is committed to the green and purple aesthetic. Even the bedding matches the van. Photo: Alix Martichoux / SFGATE

Jucy is committed to the green and purple aesthetic. Even the bedding matches the van.

Jucy is committed to the green and purple aesthetic. Even the…



Bedtime

We would have liked to sleep in the pop-up tent on the roof, but with temperatures expected to dip into the 30s overnight, we opted to sleep inside the van. Opening up the bed was easy enough. We slipped the memory foam pad into place and unfolded bedding included with the van. No surprise here: the sheets and comforter match the car’s green and purple aesthetic. The linens had a few small stains, but smelled like clean laundry right when we unzipped the carrying case.

Getting ourselves ready for bed proved a little trickier. There are privacy shields on the side and rear windows, and another for the windshield, that you can unroll and stick in place with suction cups. We went back outside and turned the kitchen into a makeshift vanity to take out contacts and pump water from the sink to wash our faces and brush our teeth.






When we finally lay down to sleep, we were cozy. The inside was just big enough for us to lie shoulder to shoulder and just barely long enough for our 5-foot-7-inch and 5-foot-9-inch frames to fully stretch out. Anyone taller than six feet probably wouldn’t be able to lay flat like we did.

One major challenge was heating. The car’s second battery doesn’t power the heat and air conditioning, so you actually have to start the engine to warm it up. Our strategy was to heat the car to an uncomfortably warm temperature, then turn the engine off, hoping that would last us through the night. The plan mostly worked, but I was grateful we brought extra blankets.

For what it’s worth, Jucy offers a winter kit for an extra charge, which includes a sub-zero sleeping bag, a thermos flask and a pair of hand warmers.

Rise and shine

When I reached to turn off my phone’s alarm at 7 a.m., I felt a crick in my neck. I had contorted myself into a strange position overnight in an attempt to stay warm and fit between my boyfriend and the cup holder in the backseat. A few of the window covers had slid out of place.

We hadn’t packed breakfast so we hit the road right away, back to civilization.

Is it worth it?

How much does this thing cost anyways? Well, it depends.

Jucy’s prices fluctuate based on demand, like airfare. During the winter low season, rates can be as low as $40 per night. In the summer, the price can jump to $110.

The rate for our trip in January was $66 per night for the rental plus an extra $25 fee for dropping off the van on a Sunday. I was surprised to find an extra $60 charge on my credit card a few days later. That’s because our trip only included 100 free miles of driving, so we were charged an additional 25 cents per mile for the extra distance we traveled.

On top of that, there were the costs outside of Jucy’s control ($43 for the campsite plus about $50 for gas), bringing the total cost to just short of $250.

Camping is supposed to be cheap, and this isn’t exactly a bargain. But for someone like me, who has never pitched a tent let alone owns one, our trip down Highway 1 in a tacky purple and green van let me get close to nature in one of the most beautiful parts of California — but not too close.

Category: Cookware Pots  Tags: ,  Comments off

Global Food Waste Disposer Market 2018 GE, Whirlpool, Emerson, Anaheim, Kitchenaid

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For Any Questions on Food Waste Disposer Market report, Ask at www.qymarketresearch.com/report/167761#inquiry-for-buying

This Report contains 15 Chapters to profoundly show the Global Food Waste Disposer Market:

Chapter 1, to explain Introduction, market review, market risk and opportunities, market driving force, product scope of Food Waste Disposer Market;
Chapter 2, to inspect the leading manufacturers (Cost Structure, Raw Material) with sales Analysis, revenue Analysis, and price Analysis of Food Waste Disposer Market;
Chapter 3, to show the focused circumstance among the best producers, with deals, income, and Food Waste Disposer market share in 2017 and 2018;
Chapter 4, to display the regional analysis of Global Food Waste Disposer Market with revenue and sales of industry, from 2018 to 2022;
Chapter 5, 6, 7, to analyze the key countries (United States, China, Europe, Japan, Korea Taiwan), with sales, revenue and market share in key regions;
Chapter 8 and 9, to display Regional Marketing Type Analysis, International Trade Type Analysis, Supply Chain Analysis;
Chapter 10 and 11, to analyze us market by-product type and application/end users (industry sales, share, and growth rate) during 2014 to 2018;
Chapter 12, to show Food Waste Disposer Market forecast by regions, forecast by type (Pulverizingtype, Dryingtype ) and forecast by application (Household, Commercial ) with revenue and sales, from 2018 to 2025;
Chapter 13, 14 15, to specify Research Findings and Conclusion, Appendix, methodology and data source of Food Waste Disposer market buyers, merchants, dealers, sales channel.

Geographically, This Food Waste Disposer Market report accommodates of regional Output, production, consumption, revenue (million USD), growth rate (CAGR) by Countries such as North America (United States, Canada, Mexico), South America (Argentina, Brazil, Ecuador, Chile), Europe (UK, France, Germany, Italy), Middle East, Africa (Turkey, Egypt, Saudi Arabia, Iran), Asia-Pacific (India, China, Japan, Korea) and more which are forecasts during 2018-2023.

Research Study Answers Following Questions:

• What are future funding possibilities in the Food Waste Disposer landscape investigating value patterns?
• How is the market anticipated to develop in the upcoming years?
• What are market openings and capable hazard related to Food Waste Disposer industry by evaluating trends?
• What are key factors that will impact development, containing future income projections?
• Which are most unique organizations with portfolios and current improvement in Food Waste Disposer industry until 2025?
• What are the essential research and development elements and information experiences to chargeable for developing market percentage?

Read Complete Food Waste Disposer Market Report at www.qymarketresearch.com/report/167761#report-details

In conclusion, Global Food Waste Disposer Market Report helps to describe the synopsis of all merchandise evolved in granular detail, with the significant perception of most recent innovations and milestones like companies presently performing in the market around the world. With last 5 years income figure the report gives a huge proposition for people and organizations about modern business investment opportunities of Food Waste Disposer market before evaluating its possibility.

Note: We also offer Regions/Countries and Sales/Industry reports versions, respectively.

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The best electric skillets you can buy

The Insider Picks team writes about stuff we think you’ll like. Business Insider has affiliate partnerships, so we get a share of the revenue from your purchase.

electric skillet 4x3Zojirushi/Business Insider

The Insider Pick:

  • The best electric skillets have even heat distribution, can cook a variety of dishes, and clean up effortlessly. The Presto 16-inch Electric Foldaway Skillet has all of these characteristics. Plus, its parts nest within each other for compact storage, and it can handle large meals.

I was first introduced to the electric skillet as a teen in my dad’s bachelor pad. He’d use it to cook up the finest Hamburger Helper cuisine while some sports game on the TV held our focus. You may be wondering, why would someone use an electric skillet instead of a burner on their stove? There are several reasons why this versatile appliance continues to find its way into homes. Electric skillets are excellent for use in the following situations:

  • RVs, tiny houses, and other living arrangements with limited kitchen space
  • Keep food warm during a potluck or other event (serving a similar role as a chafing dish)
  • Cooking side dishes on Thanksgiving or for other big meals when stove space is at a premium
  • Cooler cooking when the summer temps make using the oven or stove unbearable
  • Motel rooms, dorm rooms, or anyplace that has little to no kitchen access
  • People who just prefer even heating surfaces with a precise temperature gauge

Electric skillets are mainly designed for pan frying and sautéing, but they also brown meat nicely, deep fry, and serve as a griddle for your morning favorites. Many manufacturers offer electric skillet accessories that allow you to steam or grill.

What to Look for in an Electric Skillet

Most electric frying pans, as they are also commonly known, have the same basic design: a circular or rectangular pan, a tempered glass lid, and a power cord that comes unattached easily when yanked so you don’t have a Three Stooges-style mishap when you accidentally trip over it. The heat settings generally range from around 175 degrees Fahrenheit to at least 400 degrees Fahrenheit.

Aluminum is the most common material used in electric skillets and they’re usually covered by a non-stick coating of Teflon. You typically don’t want to use metal utensils on your pan because it can wear away the nonstick coating, which is a common problem with this appliance in the long term.

There are few game-changing unique features that set one skillet apart from another. So, when shopping for the best option for your needs, you should focus on size and performance. Many models suffer from uneven heating. Others do not maintain a consistent temperature over time. Others still do not live up to their “nonstick” credentials. Therefore, you need to do your research before you buy.

In our search for the best electric skillets, we looked closely at hundreds of expert and buyer ratings and reviews. In the end, we chose the five electric skillets in our guide based on how easy they are to clean, how versatile they are, and their track record of performance.

Read on in the slides below to learn why the Presto 16-inch Electric Foldaway Skillet is our top pick and why you might also like the Cuisinart GreenGourmet 14-Inch Nonstick Electric Skillet, the Zojirushi Gourmet d’Expert 1350-Watt Electric Skillet, the De’Longhi Electric Skillet, and the Presto 11-Inch Electric Skillet.

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