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March 16, 2018 |

Archive for » March 16th, 2018«

Low profile, high style – The Topeka Capital

Kitchens tend to be designed as star players on the residential stage. Their role is often aspirational — pro chef’s lair, for example, or the country kitchen from that Italian movie you loved.

But there’s a different story being played out by some kitchen designers today: kitchens that merge seamlessly into the rest of the main living space.

Sometimes, that’s because there are space limitations — a smallish apartment, for example, where the kitchen is cheek-to-jowl with every other room. Or there may be plenty of space, but no walls, so each living zone looks into the next.

Some new kitchens are nearly invisible; others employ decorative and design elements that assimilate them into the look of adjoining spaces.

Cabinetry is the same style, color, material and finish as other furniture. The color palette is the same or complementary. Lighting and accessories echo those in the principal rooms. Flooring is consistent throughout. Appliances are integrated. Even the island and countertops reflect materials used in adjoining spaces.

The Dunagan Diverio Design Group in Coral Gables, Fla., recently completed a Miami penthouse project with an open floor plan. The clients loved to cook and needed lots of space that functioned well.

“But they also wanted the kitchen to have clean lines and be completely integrated into the home’s design,” said firm co-founder Charlotte Dunagan. “We created a kitchen that flowed directly as part of the great room and living space. The concept we aimed for was to conceal as many of the appliances as possible, even going so far as to find a white oven to blend into the white cabinets.”

It was important to have the finishes all work together, says her partner, Tom Diverio.

“The kitchen really becomes part of the space, especially with the neutral oak wood flooring that continues throughout the home,” he said. “We were also careful to select finishes that were warm and inviting, which appear to be more like furniture.”

Pale walls in the open layout allowed for the residents’ art collection to carry through, further integrating the kitchen into the home.

Architect Dan Brunn in Los Angeles says he, too, keeps flooring the same throughout an open-plan home.

“The dining room and living room are typically connected to the kitchen, so we make the kitchen feel more ‘domesticated,’ less like a stainless steel lab,” he said. “One of my favorite things is to specify full custom-front appliances.”

Dunagan says the inspiration for the Florida penthouse came from yacht design, in which all available space is maximized. A coffee station got tucked behind pocket doors. A laundry room, service kitchen and Sub-Zero appliances also are concealed behind wood doors or cabinets in the kitchen.

Modern materials and technology make “hiding” kitchen elements easy. Smart induction cooktops are nearly unnoticeable when not in use. Appliances that formerly sat on counters are now built into drawers. LED lighting can be installed virtually anywhere.

Henrybuilt, a Seattle designer and maker of kitchen furniture and storage systems, offers solid-surface counters with drainage for the sink. Storage cubbies for tools, napkins and bread are built into milled wood counters, which are then extended to create eating tables.

Knife blocks, utensil, spices, pantry items, and recycle and trash receptacles all fit neatly out of sight in drawers and sliding cupboards.

Pay attention to how you illuminate the kitchen, says Sheva Knopfler, creative director of Brooklyn, N.Y.-based Lights.com.

“The easiest way to streamline a kitchen is to incorporate simple lighting fixtures that blend in or almost disappear,” she said. “And consider paring down the number of lighting elements, opting instead for fewer, brighter overhead fixtures.”

Pick a style that suits you, and then create a visual flow with lighting in matching metallic finishes, she suggests.

And it’s fine to tweak that plan by adding a piece that’s got some drama or playfulness.

“A statement light allows you to add a bold dash of your personality. It becomes the ‘artwork’ of the space,” Knopfler said, adding a large chandelier or a grouping of pendant fixtures might be considered.

Category: Accessories  Tags: ,  Comments off

Low profile, high style – The Topeka Capital

Kitchens tend to be designed as star players on the residential stage. Their role is often aspirational — pro chef’s lair, for example, or the country kitchen from that Italian movie you loved.

But there’s a different story being played out by some kitchen designers today: kitchens that merge seamlessly into the rest of the main living space.

Sometimes, that’s because there are space limitations — a smallish apartment, for example, where the kitchen is cheek-to-jowl with every other room. Or there may be plenty of space, but no walls, so each living zone looks into the next.

Some new kitchens are nearly invisible; others employ decorative and design elements that assimilate them into the look of adjoining spaces.

Cabinetry is the same style, color, material and finish as other furniture. The color palette is the same or complementary. Lighting and accessories echo those in the principal rooms. Flooring is consistent throughout. Appliances are integrated. Even the island and countertops reflect materials used in adjoining spaces.

The Dunagan Diverio Design Group in Coral Gables, Fla., recently completed a Miami penthouse project with an open floor plan. The clients loved to cook and needed lots of space that functioned well.

“But they also wanted the kitchen to have clean lines and be completely integrated into the home’s design,” said firm co-founder Charlotte Dunagan. “We created a kitchen that flowed directly as part of the great room and living space. The concept we aimed for was to conceal as many of the appliances as possible, even going so far as to find a white oven to blend into the white cabinets.”

It was important to have the finishes all work together, says her partner, Tom Diverio.

“The kitchen really becomes part of the space, especially with the neutral oak wood flooring that continues throughout the home,” he said. “We were also careful to select finishes that were warm and inviting, which appear to be more like furniture.”

Pale walls in the open layout allowed for the residents’ art collection to carry through, further integrating the kitchen into the home.

Architect Dan Brunn in Los Angeles says he, too, keeps flooring the same throughout an open-plan home.

“The dining room and living room are typically connected to the kitchen, so we make the kitchen feel more ‘domesticated,’ less like a stainless steel lab,” he said. “One of my favorite things is to specify full custom-front appliances.”

Dunagan says the inspiration for the Florida penthouse came from yacht design, in which all available space is maximized. A coffee station got tucked behind pocket doors. A laundry room, service kitchen and Sub-Zero appliances also are concealed behind wood doors or cabinets in the kitchen.

Modern materials and technology make “hiding” kitchen elements easy. Smart induction cooktops are nearly unnoticeable when not in use. Appliances that formerly sat on counters are now built into drawers. LED lighting can be installed virtually anywhere.

Henrybuilt, a Seattle designer and maker of kitchen furniture and storage systems, offers solid-surface counters with drainage for the sink. Storage cubbies for tools, napkins and bread are built into milled wood counters, which are then extended to create eating tables.

Knife blocks, utensil, spices, pantry items, and recycle and trash receptacles all fit neatly out of sight in drawers and sliding cupboards.

Pay attention to how you illuminate the kitchen, says Sheva Knopfler, creative director of Brooklyn, N.Y.-based Lights.com.

“The easiest way to streamline a kitchen is to incorporate simple lighting fixtures that blend in or almost disappear,” she said. “And consider paring down the number of lighting elements, opting instead for fewer, brighter overhead fixtures.”

Pick a style that suits you, and then create a visual flow with lighting in matching metallic finishes, she suggests.

And it’s fine to tweak that plan by adding a piece that’s got some drama or playfulness.

“A statement light allows you to add a bold dash of your personality. It becomes the ‘artwork’ of the space,” Knopfler said, adding a large chandelier or a grouping of pendant fixtures might be considered.

Category: Accessories  Tags: ,  Comments off

How to Use the Principals of Wabi-Sabi in Your Home

Wabi-Sabi home decor

Move over minimalism, there’s a new trend in town.

Last year, MyDomaine predicted that wabi-sabi will be the number one home décor trend of 2018 – and it’s definitely making an impact. Even though the trend is basking in its design spotlight, it’s still relatively new on the block here in America.

Are you new to the trend? Learn what it is and how you can incorporate it into your home.

What is Wabi-Sabi?

Wabi-sabi is a Japanese philosophy which finds beauty in imperfections, the temporary and the unfinished. When perfected, a wabi-sabi lifestyle should help increase happiness and contentment. It’s similar to hygge, but instead of emphasizing an appreciation of hominess, it’s an appreciation of contentment.

In Western cultures, design commonly emphasizes clean lines and symmetry. Wabi-sabi moves away from the concept of perfecting your space and focuses on appreciating what you have. This naturally leads to less clutter, a focus on quality over quantity and a sense of authenticity.

How do You Incorporate Wabi-Sabi into Your Decor?

Since this design trend is more about appreciating what you have rather than pushing you to buy more, start with what you have in your home.

Fix it Up

In the spirit of appreciating imperfections, you could fix up that old chipped cup or that footstool with the wonky leg instead of tossing out. You can mend a chip with a little epoxy, sandpaper and other odds and ends. You could even play up imperfections by mixing the epoxy with a contrasting paint or pigment color.

The trend of wabi-sabi is not against purchasing new items though. If you are in the market for some new décor pieces or furniture, there are a few elements of this lifestyle you could look for.

Handmade Goods

When shopping for home décor or furniture, look for pieces that have been handmade. They’ll have slight imperfections and pieces of character that only come from a person’s hands rather than machinery.

Appreciate the work that went into making the item you’re buying. Remember it’s about quality over quantity. Maybe instead of purchasing mass-produced, white plates, opt for hand-made ceramics.

If you don’t have access to handmade goods, look for store-bought pieces that have those little imperfections like uneven edges on your new plates or more rugged and worn looking wood for your next coffee table or bench.

Natural and Neutral

When it comes to textiles and colors, embrace the natural and the neutral.

Bright, bold colors don’t have much of a place in a wabi-sabi home. Instead, choose tones that inspire calm and peaceful vibes. Stick with neutral colors like whites, grays, tans and black colors.

Be mindful of the materials you use in your home. For textiles, choose natural fibers like linen and organic cotton. Stick with wood, glass and stone for your furniture and dinnerware.

If you want to really go for the wabi-sabi look, opt for linen sheets instead of your standard pressed content ones. The linen wrinkles easily, but somehow still looks cozy in its imperfection. Embrace the messiness a bit and leave your bed slightly unmade.

Get the Wabi-Sabi Look

Wabi-Sabi

  1. Linen Sheet Set ($44-$259)
  2. Olive Green Geometric Woven Jute Salim Area Rug ($80 – $200)
  3. Wabi-Sabi Mug ($36)
  4. Takara Side Table ($179)
  5. Glenna Dinner Plate ($22)

Category: Dinnerware  Tags: ,  Comments off

Skillet’s Jen Ledger releasing solo album, ‘Ledger’ on April 13 | The …

– The generic Dispatch designation, used primarily for press releases or syndicated content, but may be used for guest author requesting a generic nomenclature

Category: Skillets  Tags: ,  Comments off

How to Use the Principals of Wabi-Sabi in Your Home

Wabi-Sabi home decor

Move over minimalism, there’s a new trend in town.

Last year, MyDomaine predicted that wabi-sabi will be the number one home décor trend of 2018 – and it’s definitely making an impact. Even though the trend is basking in its design spotlight, it’s still relatively new on the block here in America.

Are you new to the trend? Learn what it is and how you can incorporate it into your home.

What is Wabi-Sabi?

Wabi-sabi is a Japanese philosophy which finds beauty in imperfections, the temporary and the unfinished. When perfected, a wabi-sabi lifestyle should help increase happiness and contentment. It’s similar to hygge, but instead of emphasizing an appreciation of hominess, it’s an appreciation of contentment.

In Western cultures, design commonly emphasizes clean lines and symmetry. Wabi-sabi moves away from the concept of perfecting your space and focuses on appreciating what you have. This naturally leads to less clutter, a focus on quality over quantity and a sense of authenticity.

How do You Incorporate Wabi-Sabi into Your Decor?

Since this design trend is more about appreciating what you have rather than pushing you to buy more, start with what you have in your home.

Fix it Up

In the spirit of appreciating imperfections, you could fix up that old chipped cup or that footstool with the wonky leg instead of tossing out. You can mend a chip with a little epoxy, sandpaper and other odds and ends. You could even play up imperfections by mixing the epoxy with a contrasting paint or pigment color.

The trend of wabi-sabi is not against purchasing new items though. If you are in the market for some new décor pieces or furniture, there are a few elements of this lifestyle you could look for.

Handmade Goods

When shopping for home décor or furniture, look for pieces that have been handmade. They’ll have slight imperfections and pieces of character that only come from a person’s hands rather than machinery.

Appreciate the work that went into making the item you’re buying. Remember it’s about quality over quantity. Maybe instead of purchasing mass-produced, white plates, opt for hand-made ceramics.

If you don’t have access to handmade goods, look for store-bought pieces that have those little imperfections like uneven edges on your new plates or more rugged and worn looking wood for your next coffee table or bench.

Natural and Neutral

When it comes to textiles and colors, embrace the natural and the neutral.

Bright, bold colors don’t have much of a place in a wabi-sabi home. Instead, choose tones that inspire calm and peaceful vibes. Stick with neutral colors like whites, grays, tans and black colors.

Be mindful of the materials you use in your home. For textiles, choose natural fibers like linen and organic cotton. Stick with wood, glass and stone for your furniture and dinnerware.

If you want to really go for the wabi-sabi look, opt for linen sheets instead of your standard pressed content ones. The linen wrinkles easily, but somehow still looks cozy in its imperfection. Embrace the messiness a bit and leave your bed slightly unmade.

Get the Wabi-Sabi Look

Wabi-Sabi

  1. Linen Sheet Set ($44-$259)
  2. Olive Green Geometric Woven Jute Salim Area Rug ($80 – $200)
  3. Wabi-Sabi Mug ($36)
  4. Takara Side Table ($179)
  5. Glenna Dinner Plate ($22)

Category: Dinnerware  Tags: ,  Comments off

Prost Kitchen + Bar adds to USF area restaurant scene



TAMPA In German, prost means cheers, but at Prost Kitchen + Bar, diners have plenty of options beyond just German food and beer.

“Its a European gastropub,” said owner Cody Jay. “It does have a lot of German influences, but we try to touch on all different kinds of things.”

Since opening in late January on Bearss Avenue, Prost Kitchen + Bar has been frequented by University of South Florida students, staff, and faculty. USF President Judy Genshaft has even stopped by.

“Everyone loves the food,” said Jay.

The menu features charcuterie, sausage skillets, salads, pub sandwiches and burgers. Entrees include fish and chips, short rib, and jaeger schnitzel. There are daily specials, such as Taco Tuesday, and a special late night menu. Brunch is available from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Sunday, featuring $8 bottomless mimosas.

There are 22 beers on tap, including premium import beers and local craft beers. Wine and specialty cocktails such as the rosemary greyhound and prost mule are available.

The restaurant will hold a St. Patricks Day celebration Saturday (March 17). There will be $3 green beer all day, $8 bottomless mimosas from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., a cornhole tournament and live music.

Prost Kitchen + Bar is located at 2802 E Bearss Ave. It is open 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. Sunday- Wednesday, and 11 a.m. to 1 a.m. Thursday-Saturday. For more information, call (813) 466-5249, or visit prostkitchen.com.

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Category: Skillets  Tags: ,  Comments off