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May 13, 2018 |

Archive for » May 13th, 2018«

Local shop celebrates World Fair Trade Day


FORT WAYNE, Ind. (WANE) – Third World Shoppe in downtown Fort Wayne celebrates World Fair Trade Day.

The global event celebrates fair trade as a tangible contribution to sustainable development, according to the World Fair Trade Organization. 

Third World Shoppe allows people to sell their own handcrafted jewelry, kitchen accessories, children’s toys, organic coffee, teas, chocolates, spices, and soup mixes. The goal is to allow low-income individuals a fair way to trade items to support their families. 

The Third World Shoppe was started in 1972 by a group of Fort Wayne students and teachers. The goal was to provide a way to alleviate poverty through programs that promote self-reliance. It’s run by a group of volunteers and is a non-profit organization. 

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Local shop celebrates World Fair Trade Day


FORT WAYNE, Ind. (WANE) – Third World Shoppe in downtown Fort Wayne celebrates World Fair Trade Day.

The global event celebrates fair trade as a tangible contribution to sustainable development, according to the World Fair Trade Organization. 

Third World Shoppe allows people to sell their own handcrafted jewelry, kitchen accessories, children’s toys, organic coffee, teas, chocolates, spices, and soup mixes. The goal is to allow low-income individuals a fair way to trade items to support their families. 

The Third World Shoppe was started in 1972 by a group of Fort Wayne students and teachers. The goal was to provide a way to alleviate poverty through programs that promote self-reliance. It’s run by a group of volunteers and is a non-profit organization. 

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Local shop celebrates World Fair Trade Day


FORT WAYNE, Ind. (WANE) – Third World Shoppe in downtown Fort Wayne celebrates World Fair Trade Day.

The global event celebrates fair trade as a tangible contribution to sustainable development, according to the World Fair Trade Organization. 

Third World Shoppe allows people to sell their own handcrafted jewelry, kitchen accessories, children’s toys, organic coffee, teas, chocolates, spices, and soup mixes. The goal is to allow low-income individuals a fair way to trade items to support their families. 

The Third World Shoppe was started in 1972 by a group of Fort Wayne students and teachers. The goal was to provide a way to alleviate poverty through programs that promote self-reliance. It’s run by a group of volunteers and is a non-profit organization. 

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Treating women well — today and every day

 

 

Happy Mothers’ Day.

After multiple examples of men who exited the scene because of accusations related to the improper treatment of women, I am thankful that our country has a day when we focus on our moms. It’s a time in our society when we go above and beyond to treat our moms well. Honoring mothers today is a good thing, but let us remember that women — not just mothers — are to be treated well every day of the year. 

Since Harvey Weinstein in October 2017, over 70 famous men have either been fired or forced to resign after accusations of sexual misconduct ranging from inappropriate comments to rape. These include Jerry Richardson of the Carolina Panthers, Donovan McNabb and Eric Davis of ESPN, Trent Franks of Arizona, Ruben Kihuen of Nevada, Al Franken of Minnesota, John Conyers Jr. of Michigan, Garrison Keillor of “A Praire Home Companion,” Matt Lauer of “Today,” Charlie Rose of CBS and Kevin Spacey of “House of Cards.” 

Spacey’s house obviously wasn’t the only one built of cards.

Accusations and resignations not only have taken place in the world of politics, news, sports and entertainment — church leaders like Bill Hybels of Willow Creek and others in my own denomination, the Southern Baptist Convention, have been irresponsible and complicit.

Teenage boys today are not going to learn how to treat women by texting their friends, immersing themselves in the modern subculture of frivolity and immaturity, surfing the web or watching the nonsense that often appears on the flat screen in our living rooms. If our children and grandchildren are going to learn how men should treat women (and for that matter how human beings should treat other human beings), then they must learn by witnessing it modeled by the adults in their lives — dads and moms, teachers and coaches, principals and pastors.

The objectification of women is unacceptable and should never be tolerated.

On days like this, the five boys in my house think particularly about all that mom does every day. We’ll celebrate mom. She will get some special presents. The boys will work hard to make her feel special. She will be honored. Today is her day.

However, Mother’s Day is not about what mom does, but who Mom is

A woman’s value is found not in what she does. Rather her value lies in the fact that she is made in the image of her Creator. 

Sometimes, our family eats off paper plates. During times like this, we are motivated more by convenience than anything else. At other times we eat off real dinner plates — plates that have to be washed, not thrown away. On really, really special occasions, we pull out the fine China that usually stays stored in the cupboard. Over the years, I’ve noticed that the kids’ behavior is different depending on the kind of dinnerware we are using. Dinner plates are handled better and more carefully than paper plates. Fine China is handled even better and more carefully and with additional respect.

In a day when men often treat women like paper plates, we need to model before them not only the significance of dinnerware, but the importance and value of fine China.

Indeed, as it relates to relationships in our country between men and women, this is a sober time. This is an important time.

Dads, take the opportunity of Mother’s Day today and ensure that your kids see the way a man should treat a woman. You might even want to pull out the fine China.

Todd E. Brady is vice president for university ministries at Union University. Write to him at 1050 Union University Drive, Jackson, TN 38305.

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Induction is the best cooking tech you’re not using. $1K range is a game-changer

In 1956, Frigidaire, then part of General Motors, created a “Kitchen of the Future” exhibition, featuring auto-dispensing ingredients controlled by recipes fed into IBM computers. The marble countertops hid induction heating elements rather than radiant or gas stoves. Induction ranges have been a reality since the 1970s, but only two percent of United States households have made the switch. Frigidaire, now an Electrolux brand, thinks it’s found the secret to getting Americans to switch: a range that costs under $1,000 but still boils water faster than a microwave.

“When you cook with induction, you realize it’s not just one thing that’s better. Everything is better,” Amie Guy, Electrolux’s vice president of marketing, told Digital Trends during a hands-on cooking demonstration for its new Frigidaire Gallery FGIF3036TF. The benefits include rapid boiling, less wasted energy, safer operation, and easier cleaning.

What is induction?

If you currently have an electric stove and your wiring hasn’t been updated since the 1980s, Guy said your kitchen should be able to handle an induction range.

At $990, the Frigidaire Gallery FGIF3036TF might be inexpensive enough to convert more Americans to induction cooking.

“Anytime you put any magnetic metal in an electromagnetic field with an A/C current, you get heat,” said Lee Chappell, an electrical hardware engineer at Electrolux. The current runs through the element’s copper wire, creating the electromagnetic field, while the magnetic pan provides the ferrous metal required to create heat.

“We don’t generate heat and transfer the heat through the glass,” Chappell said. “The heat is actually generated in the pan.” Most copper pots and pans won’t work, and cookware requires a certain mass to trigger the stove’s detection feature. “You can’t just lay a fork on there,” he said. “We have to guarantee it doesn’t turn on with a small piece of metal for safety.” If the stovetop is turned on but doesn’t detect cookware, it will shut itself off after three minutes.

Though the element is heating just the pan, there will be some warmth transferred to the cooking surface. But since it’s not as hot as a typical burner, food doesn’t get cooked on, making cleanup easier.

Hot pot

As we said, very few copper pots are induction-compatible, but if you take a magnet to your cookware, you’ll probably be surprised to find much of what you own is compatible. We tested everything in our cupboards and found our All-Clad nonstick pans, stainless steel kettle and pots, cast-iron skillet, and Le Creuset dutch oven were all magnetic. Only one of our stainless steel pans wasn’t attracted to our fridge magnet. Because induction cooktops require flat-bottomed pots and pans, woks and similar cookware may not work on induction stoves.

Very little energy is wasted when induction cookers heat pots, which in turn warm up their contents. By creating heat in the cookware, it’s not spending time making a burner hot before it can transfer that heat to the pan. Skipping that middleman surface translates to faster cooking. They say a watched pot never boils, but we poured one 16.9-ounce bottle of water into a tea kettle, and the Frigidaire induction burner had it whistling in about a minute and a half. The gas burner took around four minutes, while our own radiant stove took 30 seconds longer. We typically heat up a mug of water in the microwave for two minutes to make tea, so the induction range was even quicker than that.

Take the temperature

There’s a reason smart cooktops such as the FirstBuild Paragon, Hestan Cue, and Buzzfeed Tasty One Top all use induction. Induction holds temperature really well, which is crucial to the kind of “precision cooking” these products promise. Using a temperature sensor that communicates with the cooker, induction can make adjustments to ensure your food doesn’t burn. We left a cheese roux on the keep-warm setting and it stayed scorch-free, even without stirring.

“Induction is the greatest technology that no one is using.”

The Frigidaire range isn’t smart, but it will also stay at its assigned temperature. To demonstrate this, Electrolux’s engineering manager Steve Swayne made some pancakes. A former restaurateur and chef, Swayne now helps develop the company’s cooking appliances. Before adding batter to two pans — one on an induction range and the other on an electric — Swayne waited about 13 minutes with the stoves on. When he added the cooking spray and pancake mix, the electric range’s pan smoked and blackened the batter. The induction range delivered a brown pancake.

“You don’t have to throw that first one out,” Guy said.

There are some features available in Europe that haven’t yet made it over to the smaller U.S. induction market. Chef Mode uses presets, such as high, medium, and low, to let owners slide cookware to different quadrants and change the temperature without touching controls. Using presets can make people better cooks, Swayne said. They wouldn’t necessarily have to know that melt is a lower temperature than keep warm or what number to set the stove to for simmering.

“Most people think simmer is the lowest setting ever,” he said, but “simmer’s actually right below a boil, and if you don’t have that right temperature, you’re either boiling — taking too much water out, so your sauce is overly thick or you might scorch it — or if you have it really low and you’re just keeping it warm, your sauce is runny. So, when the recipe says simmer for 45 minutes, most people are keeping warm and they’re wondering why their stew is really soup or their sauce is runny or their burning it.”

Guy calls induction “the greatest technology that no one is using.” If you live in the U.S. and have never seen it in action, it’s likely because “almost 80 percent of cooking products sold [here] are under $1,000,” she said. Before this Frigidaire model, the ranges started at $1,500, and most were closer to $2,000 or above. Those who already have induction in their homes are “either wealthy, or they know about it and they’re passionate about it, and they have to have it,” Swayne said.

“Although we took cost out of this unit, we didn’t take performance out.”

He explained how Frigidaire was able to get the price of its induction stove to $990: “Although we took cost out of this unit, we didn’t take performance out. We removed a lot of copper wire, which is really expensive, and made it easier to manufacture.”

In the range’s quick-start guide, there’s a small section with suggests cooking levels for melting chocolate, simmering spaghetti sauce, and searing steak. Considering how new the technology is to many Americans, it would be nice if this section were more robust. We can picture people being unprepared for how quickly their pans will heat up.

Coming to America?

In 2007, the number of people who owned induction-cooking appliances in Europe were similar to what the U.S.’s are now. Electrolux and other manufacturers brought down the cost there, and now roughly half the homes use induction, Guy said.

As of 2015, about 74.4 million homes in the U.S. were cooking with electric stoves or ovens, compared to about 39.9 million using gas, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Guy thinks once people start seeing induction in their friends’ and neighbors’ homes, the once futuristic kitchen technology will go mainstream.




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Everything You Need To Know About Syphilis

Cast-iron skillets, knitting, and fedoras aren’t the only retro things making a comeback. It’s time to welcome back… syphilis!

Yep, syphilis was almost eradicated just two decades ago thanks to antibiotics, but now it’s back in business. Between 2012 and 2016, syphilis rates among women more than doubled, according to the Centers for Disease Control. The CDC also estimates that there were 27,814 cases of reported syphilis in 2016, an 18 percent increase since 2015.

Syphilis is a chronic infectious disease caused by the bacteria Treponema pallidum, and spread via oral, vaginal, or anal sex, the CDC says. “Chlamydia, gonorrhea and syphilis are major public health problems worldwide, affecting millions of peoples’ quality of life, causing serious illness and sometimes death,” says Ian Askew, Director of Reproductive Health and Research at the World Health Organization.

The syphilis symptoms you should know about

One of the big problems with syphilis is that the earlier symptoms are so easy to miss. Generally the only sign of stage-one syphilis (yep, there are three stages) is one or more small, painless bumps at the site of the infection. The bumps stick around for three to six weeks then disappear on their own but make no mistake, this doesn’t mean the syphilis is gone and you still need treatment, Diaz says.

The second stage is characterized by a rash, often appearing as reddish-brown spots on the palms of your hands and soles of your feet. The rash usually isn’t itchy and may be very faint, according to the CDC. You may also experience a fever, swollen lymph nodes, sore throat, patchy hair loss, headaches, weight loss, muscle aches, and fatigue during this stage. Again these are all symptoms that are easy to dismiss as a cold or flu. (Hint: This is one reason why all sexually active women need to get regular screenings, even if you feel fine, Diaz says.)

This rash and other symptoms will eventually go away on their own but that’s not good news as it means the disease has moved into the final stage—the stage where it can maim, disable, and even kill you.

Third-stage syphilis (a.k.a tertiary syphilis) is a nightmare and you do not want it. The bacteria can lay dormant in your body for years or even decades but eventually they will spread. Once the bacteria have infected your whole body, usually 10 to 30 years after the original infection, they can cause a ton of health problems, Diaz says. These may include dementia, blindness, open sores, infertility, chronic pelvic pain, heart problems, migraines, paralysis, and even inflammation of the brain and death.

Why syphilis symptoms in women are especially terrible

Syphilis is known to cause pelvic inflammatory disease, ectopic pregnancies, miscarriages, and stillbirths, Diaz says. If you do get pregnant with syphilis there’s a significant chance you’ll pass the disease to your child.

Syphilis treatment is effective—but time is of the essence

To cure syphilis, the new WHO guidelines recommend a single dose of benzathine penicillin. You can forget the pink drink or pills though—this one is an injection straight into your butt. This shot is the most effective treatment for syphilis and is more effective and cheaper than oral antibiotics, they add.

The sooner you get the treatment the better off you’ll be, Diaz says. Later-stage syphilis may require more aggressive treatment and the antibiotics can’t undo the damage already done to your body.

This disease is totally preventable

Two words: Safe. Sex. And if we can add a few more: Every. Time.

It’s important to talk honestly with past and potential sex partners about their possibility of exposure and make sure you’re having consistent check-ups and screenings. “The assumption is that ‘I don’t have to use protection because I can always take an antibiotic and I’ll be fine’,” Diaz says. “Don’t fall into this trap.”

What it’s like to have syphilis:

“My first boyfriend was also my first sex partner and I was his. After we broke up, I started dating a new guy. About three months into the relationship, I went in to get tested for a yeast infection and instead found out I had a yeast infection and syphilis.

“My boyfriend said he had always tested 100 percent clean for STDs. So clearly someone was lying to me. I’d always insisted on condoms (even though I’m on birth control) but my doctor said I could get it from giving head too. I honestly don’t know how I got it. Thank goodness I got that yeast infection though or I would never have known; I didn’t have one single symptom. I got treated for it and am fine now.” —Anonymous

“I discovered I had syphilis when I went to give blood. They test donated blood for lots of things before they can use it. I was shocked as hell when they told me I tested positive for syphilis. I have no idea how I got it.

“I’ve only been with three men and my current boyfriend also donated blood and his passed, so obviously I didn’t get it from him. The other two guys, we always used condoms, and I never did anal or oral or kinky stuff. I was sure the blood bank was wrong so I went to my gyno and, yep, I really had it.

“I was hysterical. Eventually my doctor calmed me down and pointed out that it really didn’t matter how I got it, only that now I knew I had it and could get treated. I got the shot, which felt like peanut butter being injected into my ass. And I guess I’m fine? It still upsets me that I don’t know how I got it.” —Anonymous

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