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August 1, 2018 |

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So you want a new kitchen? 6 pro tips for starting the process

So you want a new kitchen? Whether you’re considering designing a kitchen using your own architect, a kitchen planner hired through a store like Ikea or Home Depot, or an online planning service, professionals suggest keeping a few things in mind.

1. Plan ahead. Way ahead.

“Many people start planning their kitchen a year ahead of time, and that’s about right,” says John Allen, a services planner at Ikea in the United States. “The more you’ve worked out what you want ahead of time, the more smoothly things will go once you start working with a kitchen planner.”

Be as specific as you can about what you like and how much you can spend.

“If you already know exactly which appliances you want, and what kind of sink, that helps a lot,” Allen says. Changing a fridge or range halfway through the planning can throw everything off, since even an inch or two difference in appliance dimensions could mean rethinking all the cabinets.

2. Make your kitchen work for you.

Do you have kids? Are you right-handed or left-handed? Will more than one person be cooking at the same time?

The answers to questions like these affect the placement of microwave, dishwasher, sink, cabinet, kitchen island and more. “If you’re 5 feet tall, 40-inch cabinets may not be ideal for you,” Allen says.

And just because you’re going with one company for kitchen planning and cabinet boxes doesn’t mean you can’t use another for cabinet and drawer fronts, decorative drawer pulls and more.

When starting your kitchen remodel, professionals suggest you think about your specific needs and be realistic about how long it all will take. (Ikea via AP)

For example, Semihandmade, a Los Angeles company, makes cabinets, drawer fronts and accessories specifically made to fit Ikea cabinet boxes. Company founder John McDonald says he can offer more upscale veneers “and can manage a lot of customization work that Ikea can’t do, like special door sizes, doors for appliance fronts, and custom bookcases to match cabinetry.”

Even if going with a laminate countertop seems tempting and more affordable in the short term, consider the impact your choices will make on the eventual resale value of your home. “People move a lot these days, and countertops and flooring always come up in home ads,” Allen says.

4. Measure, and measure again.

“There’s a saying that goes ‘measure twice, cut once.’ Well for kitchens, I’d say measure three times,” Allen warns. “No matter how new or old your house is, chances are things aren’t quite even. And you’ll need to measure outlets and vents and window frames as well.”

There’s more involved than meets the eye, and it often pays to hire a professional to measure the room.

“The foundation of everything you do is getting accurate and comprehensive measurements up front,” says Rachel Getz, associate merchant in countertops at Home Depot. For between $99 and $129, Home Depot will send a service provider to measure the kitchen and design the project. Ikea will have your site professionally measured and designed for a refundable $199.

“No matter who’s doing your kitchen, it’s worth it to invest a few hundred dollars up front to get things properly measured,” says McDonald.

5. Know when to cut corners and when to leave it to the pros.

“When clients propose installing their own kitchen, I like to ask them if they installed their own water heater or did their own roofing,” says Allen. “If the answer is yes, they can probably manage it. If not, they may want to reconsider.”

To save money, he suggests, homeowners might do the disassembly and painting themselves, leaving the installation to the pros.

(Ikea via AP)

6. Be realistic about the time frame.

Dismantling and preparing the kitchen and flooring ahead of installation will take time. Contractors often take longer than expected, and plumbers and electricians aren’t always available on the day you’ll need them. And even with perfect turnaround time, custom countertops will take at least two weeks, the experts say, and can’t be templated until the cabinets have been installed.

Have an alternative space set up with a microwave, tabletop and small fridge; you’ll need a place to prepare food while your dream kitchen is in the works.

“It’s important to remember that you’re likely to encounter roadblocks that may extend the timeline,” says Stephanie Sisco, home editor at Real Simple magazine. “Whether it’s a surprise that’s uncovered when a wall is opened up or a change is made to the design plan, it can delay your renovation’s progress. So give yourself some wiggle room and don’t plan a party for the day you think it’s going to be completed.”

Austin-based company is selling Instagram-friendly cookware for a new generation of cooks

Not every cook loves to spend hours in Bed Bath and Beyond picking out pots and pans.

An Austin-based company is taking a millennial-minded, direct-to-consumer approach to selling the tools you need to make dinner.

Made In selling pots and pans that are shipped to your house. Many shoppers buy them in bundles that include several different types of cookware. Contributed by Made In.

By selling online only, Made In founders Jake Kalick and Chip Malt knew that they could appeal to customers who were already buying eyeglasses, razors and underwear through the internet.

But why pots and pans?

The easy answer is that Kalick grew up in the cookware industry. His grandparents started Harbour, a Boston-based commercial foodservice company, in the 1920s. He and Malt have known each other since they were 5 years old and growing up in Boston, but they stayed in touch as they started their careers.

Kalick worked in food, first in restaurants and then for his family’s business. Malt was working for a direct-to-consumer apparel company and had millennials’ buying habits on his mind.

“Have you ever thought about kitchen tools?” he asked Kalick one day a few years ago.

That was the start of what became Made In. Over two years, the friends-turned-business partners dug into the supply chain to find U.S. manufacturers to products the sauce and saute pans they wanted to sell. Kalick knew the markups that were built into the price of the familiar brands, such as All-Clad, so he knew they could increase the quality — and keep manufacturing in the U.S. — by selling to customers directly. Pots and pans might be heavy, but they are relatively easy to ship.

But before they started designing the product line, the company surveyed 100 cooks about what they knew and didn’t know about pots and pans. “Nobody had brand affinity and everyone was waiting until they were married” to buy them, Kalick says. Customers didn’t want the handles to get hot and they didn’t like the current handles on the market, so they engineered slightly slimmer handles that don’t get so hot.

With bright colors and thoughtful design, Made In is trying to capture the millennial market of cooks who need kitchen gear. Contributed by Made In.

The founders say it was an easy decision to base their company in Austin. They looked at Los Angeles and Miami, but Kalick says the thriving start-up and food communities in Austin — “the Brooklyn of America,” he says. They moved here in early 2017 and, by September, they were shipping pots and pans across the country.

Having spent so much time in the cookware industry, Kalick puts an emphasis on transparency around what the pans are made of and where the materials come from. “Transparency is a big thing for direct to consumer in general, which is why we explain why we source 430 stainless steel from Kentucky or 304 (stainless steel) from Pennsylvania that has nickel that helps resist corrosion.”

Kalick might have the background in cookware, but Malt says he considers himself the target demographic: He cooks three times a week and doesn’t shy away from calling himself a “foodie.” He still eats at restaurants but also entertains at home.

But selling cookware to millennials is quite different than selling clothing. “In the apparel world, our primary problem was to have people trade away from brands they already love. In this space, it’s a completely different challenge. You go to a 23-year-old and say ‘All-Clad,’ they give you a blank stare.”

Some of the pots and pans from Made In have a traditional look, but they are designed to compete with the high-end brands on the market. Contributed by Made In.

Millennials might not be buying homes as fast as generations before them, but they are investing in the stuff in their homes, Malt says, and they are always looking for an excuse to get together. When the founders both lived in New York City after college, they hosted monthly dinner parties for their friends. Food was how they kept their friendship going as they both worked for other companies.

“One of our big missions is bringing back the dinner party,” says Kalick. “We want to encourage people to host get-togethers. Some of the most fun nights are going to a dinner party to eat and drink and with someone who does it right.”

That’s when the pots and pans come in. Although experienced cooks like Malt and Kalick can differentiate between high-end and low-end cookware, many beginning cooks can’t. But having good gear “helps you look like you know what you’re doing,” Kalick says.

Twenty- and thirty-something cooks aren’t the only shoppers who need new pots and pans, of course. Even if the prices might seem high to first-time buyers ($79 for a 10-inch non-stick frying pan, $155 for an 8-quart stock pot), Baby Boomers who already have some high-end gear in their kitchen see value in Made In’s induction-capable product line, Malt says.

A nice set of pots and pans is something that many people used to wait until they got married to buy, but millennials are changing American buying habits, including cookware. Contributed by Made In.

Within the general categories of stock pot, saute pans, saucier, sauce pan and frying pan, the company sells about 30 different products in various colors, sizes and finishes, and the majority of sales come from the kits that bundle several pans together.

One question they often get is about the safety of non-stick pans. Malt says the fear of nonstick coating is outdated. Decades ago, American consumers heard a lot about a Teflon as a possible carcinogen, but the specific chemical that was of concern — PFOA — is no longer used in Teflon, he says.

However, the concern over Teflon helped the industry find better ways to create a nonstick surface that doesn’t chip or scratch as easily. Made In works with a company in Pennsylvania, which applies three coats of an FDA-approved PTFE, which creates a durable nonstick surface that won’t easily scratch or chip.

Because Malt and Kalick are making Instagram-worthy cooking gear for an Instagram-loving generation, the pans come in several colors, including options for blue and graphic nonstick options. They’ll eventually sell chef’s knives and other kitchen gear, but for now, look out for a specialty cookware line this fall featuring designs from the Austin-based illustrator Will Bryant.

Each Made In pan comes with a recipe etched onto the bottom. Contributed by Made In.

All Made In pots and pans come with a recipe on the bottom, which might seem like an odd place to put a recipe that you might need to reference while you’re cooking, but Malt says the recipe becomes a talking point for cooks.

“I can’t remember when I looked at the bottom of the pan and had any feeling at all,” Malt says. “It sparks conversation. We just wanted to do something different. We didn’t start this business to do things the way people have always done it.”



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KitchenAid Professional 6-Qt. Stand Mixer only $219 (51% off)

The KitchenAid KL26M1XSL Professional 6-Qt. Bowl-Lift Stand Mixer is only $219.00 (51% off) at Amazon today with the Deal of the Day!

This large capacity mixer is available in red, black or silver and includes powerknead spiral dough hook, flat beater, and stainless steel wire whip.

This KitchenAid Professional 6-Qt. Bowl is usually $449.99 and is on sale today for only $219.00 at Amazon.com HERE!

Product Description:

The power hub turns your stand mixer into a culinary center, with more than 15 optional attachments available.

6-Qt. stainless steel bowl with comfortable handle offers enough capacity to mix dough for 13 dozen cookies.

67-Point Planetary mixing action means 67 touch points per rotation around the bowl for thorough ingredient Incorporation.

The bowl-lift design provides sturdy bowl support for stability when mixing heavy ingredients or large batches.

Powerful enough for nearly any task or recipe.

Includes powerknead spiral dough hook, flat beater, and stainless steel wire whip.

Shipping is free if you have Amazon Prime or on orders over $25. Get a 30 free trial at Amazon.com HERE.

Keep in mind that Amazon sale prices change often so if you click on the link and the price is different than the one in the post, that means the deal has ended and is no longer available at that price.

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Smart Spending Resources is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.

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Info doesn’t cause panic, but a lack of info does

We drink, we eat, we line the kids up at the drinking fountains after recess. And then, the news arrives, and the tug of war begins between the light tread of calmingly manufactured, tip-toed answers and people’s righteous desire for information.

This dance is going on in at least 30 sites in our country and in places around the world when it comes to per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances, known in shorthand as PFAS.

This marvelous invention of the 1930s and its derivatives gave us nonstick skillets, waterproof shoes and jackets, stain-resistant carpet, and a white foam that snuffed out nasty fires.

When we eat and drink it, it also can interfere with growth, learning, and behavior of infants and children and human hormones, lower a woman’s chance of getting pregnant, and increase cholesterol levels and cancer risks.

Now these robust, non-degradable compounds are turning up in soil and groundwater — most recently, in a 4-acre site less than 1,000 feet from a Traverse City elementary school. The contamination is the likely result of the weeks-long dousing of a 1995 tire fire with PFAS-containing aqueous film forming foam at Carl’s Retreading.

Contamination was first detected in May — ahem — that could potentially impact drinking water at the school and 35 surrounding homes. The state’s PFAS action team (just created in 2017) took samples July 16, and could have results this week, according to a health department statement.

This now presents a grand opportunity on the behalf of our government agencies that take our tax money to protect our health — talk to us.

Talk to us in plain language. Talk to us early, and talk to us often. Do not hide behind the guise of scientific methodology.

We understand that testing takes time. Educate us. Be proactive and honest. Don’t mince your steps because you’re hiding from the specter of liability.

Of course we’re scared to learn the results. Who knows what we — our kids — have been unwittingly exposed to? How will it impact our health, our homes, our livelihood?

But no or slow information just muddies — or foams, in the case of the PFAS contamination of Camp Grayling’s Lake Margrethe — the waters.

We don’t know the far-flung, far-reaching impacts of PFAS contamination. But we want to. And we want to show the other communities across the country and world that we’ve learned something from contamination information flow (i.e., Flint or any number of others) that has varied from a drip-drop mishap to a gully washer of criminal conduct and coverup.

— TRAVERSE CITY RECORD-EAGLE (AP)

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Plates, Platters and Nothing Else Matters: National Competition at the LBI Foundation of the Arts and Sciences

Utilitarian dinnerware that has surpassed its “usefulness” and can stand alone as art objects is the premise for the “Plates, Platters and Nothing Else Matters: National Juried Competition 2018 Exhibition” at the Long Beach Island Foundation of the Arts and Sciences through Aug. 12. Artist and activist Roberto Lugo served as juror, and LBIF ceramic studio manager Jeff Ruemeli hung the show. Luckily, Ruemeli was available to give a tour of the show before it opened to the public and gave his take on some of the standout pieces.

Three pieces by Matthew Patton of Seattle started Ruemeli’s discourse. “These really speak to me as a glass blower,” he said, explaining that most pottery glazes are melted glass. “I can see the experimentation that went into them; the artist is exploring surface.” On a green and white plate that mimics sea foam, the artist’s glaze had bubbled up to create texture. Another plate works as an abstract painting, and the third has an interesting crackle slip. “You can see the depth of the glazes; you can see the movement and the fluidity of glass.”

Ruemeli rolled his eyes at a few of the obvious “statement pieces,” one mocking Trump as a poop emoji. But local ceramics artist Sandra Kosinski’s plate urging people of all colors to vote served up the right political tone.

“Last year’s winner, Mimi Logothetis, is back in triplicate,” Ruemeli noted. Her three large plates are covered in digital transfers of drawings. Two are cracked but were mended with gold leaf, a process the Japanese used in ancient times to preserve precious vessels and to signify that, unlike nature, all of man’s work is ultimately flawed.

Two plates covered in lush woodland drawings including fanciful toads by C.J. Niehaus were created with pencil underglazes. They are whimsical like children’s book illustrations, and a bit too cute for Ruemeli’s tastes. He preferred a “Crow” plate by Marina Smelik. “It’s a short narrative, but not overloaded with imagery.”

Ruemeli liked the more-abstract design of the next plate, by Rebecca Zweibel. “It has the gesture line that is ‘in the moment’ and something I like. There’s a little more going on, nothing overly thought out. She’s letting the muse take her through the process of creation.”

But he was taken by Anja Bartels’ “Whale” platter. It was done using the sgraffito method of scratching through layers of colored slip. “I like its whimsical nature and how the design fits the platter,” he said. “Also, it reminds me of a video game that uses the same imagery of the whale.”

Colette Smith’s “Shino Fish Platter” caught his eye. “She’s a resident potter here, a working professional artist for over 40 years from the Baltimore Clay Studio. She’s wildly talented,” said Ruemeli.

Two platters by Sharon Bartmann used “site specific” art to inspire her. Taking photos of “trashed” environs, a strip mall parking lot or an urban vacant field, she also included maps or clues to their whereabouts and added her picked-trash items from the site as handles.

“Overall the show is interesting,” Ruemeli said. “There isn’t a general theme besides showcasing the wide breadth of the ceramic field as picked by Roberto (Lugo); he’s the juror, and it’s a good representation of that breadth.”

patjohnson@thesandpaper.net

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Save $170 on a KitchenAid stand mixer — and more of today’s best deals from around the web

The Insider Picks team writes about stuff we think you’ll like. Business Insider has affiliate partnerships, so we get a share of the revenue from your purchase.

Since you don’t have all day to scour the web for noteworthy sales and discounts, we rounded up the best bargains for you to shop in one convenient place.



Amazon

1. Save $170 on a KitchenAid stand mixer

KitchenAid’s line of stand mixers is the gold standard for home cooks and professional bakers alike. Its spacious 6-quart stainless steel bowl provides enough room to mix dough for up to 3 dozen cookies at a time. Although it normally costs over $400, you can save as much as $171.99 by buying it as an Amazon deal of the day.

KitchenAid Professional 6 Quart Bowl Stand Mixer, $219 (Originally $390.99) [You save $171.99]



Backcountry

2. Save up to 50% on brand name outdoor gear at Backcountry

Backcountry is a one-stop shop for all things related to the outdoors. The huge variety of top brands is reason enough to shop there year round, but the retailer is having a great sale that all adventurers are going to want to take advantage of. Right now, you can save up to 50% on outdoor apparel, gear, and accessories during the brand’s semi-annual sale.

Shop the Backcountry semi-annual sale now.



Shutterstock

3. Save an extra 10% on college essentials on eBay

In preparation for back to school season, online-only retailer eBay is having a big sale with everything you’ll need to get take on the new school year. Now through August 3, you can save an extra 10% on college essentials like laptops, backpacks, cameras, bedding, luggage, and more by using the coupon code ” PUMPED10 ” at checkout. If you’re not an avid shopper on the site, check out 7 easy tips to shopping with confidence on eBay .

Shop the eBay sale now.



asphaltgold

4. Save an extra 20% select summer styles at Nike

Nike is having a huge sale on sneakers, apparel, and accessories for men, women, and kids. Now through August 11, you can save an extra 20% on select summer styles that have already been discounted by using the promo code ” HOT20 ” at checkout.

Shop the Nike clearance sale now.



Sleep Number

5. Save up to $500 on select Sleep Number 360 Smart Beds

If you can never decide on a soft or firm mattress, Sleep Number has a new series of mattresses just for you. The Sleep Number 360 Smart Bed can sense your movements then automatically adjust firmness, comfort, and support. By connecting to the SleepIQ app, you’ll also get a full report on your sleep patterns to learn what helps you get the best sleep ever. Now through August 15, you can save up to $500 on select 360 Smart Beds. Each mattress comes with a 100-night trial, so if it’s not the best sleep you’ve ever had, you can return it.

Shop all Sleep Number 360 Smart Beds now.



Amazon

6. Get up to $35 off a new 4K Fire TV device when you trade in your old streamer

Amazon wants you to experience HD streaming through its latest 4K Fire TV Devices, even if you have a streamer from another brand. To help you make the switch, Amazon is offering up to $35 off the Fire TV Cube or Fire TV with 4K Ultra when you trade in eligible Roku, Apple TV, and Chromecast devices.

Learn more about trading in your streamer for an Amazon 4K Fire TV device here.



Wayfair

7. Save up to 70% on outdoor furnishings at Wayfair

Summer is here, you’ll be spending a lot more time outdoors and in the backyard. Wayfair is helping you prepare for the season with huge savings on all outdoor needs. You can save up to 70% on everything from gazebos and dining sets to hot tubs and grills. Get ready for the spring and summer seasons with these amazing deals while they last.

Shop the Wayfair Outdoor Sale now.



Nordstrom

8. Get sitewide savings during Nordstrom’s biggest sale of the year

As the brand’s biggest sale of the year, the Nordstrom Anniversary Sale is filled with huge savings across the entire site. Now through August 5, you can save on top brands in categories like fashion, home, and beauty.

Shop the Nordstrom Anniversary Sale now.

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Austin-based company is selling Instagram-friendly cookware for a new generation of cooks

Not every cook loves to spend hours in Bed Bath and Beyond picking out pots and pans.

An Austin-based company is taking a millennial-minded, direct-to-consumer approach to selling the tools you need to make dinner.


Made In selling pots and pans that are shipped to your house. Many shoppers buy them in bundles that include several different
types of cookware. Contributed by Made In.

By selling online only,
Made In founders Jake Kalick and Chip Malt knew that they could appeal to customers who were already buying eyeglasses, razors and
underwear through the internet.

But why pots and pans?

The easy answer is that Kalick grew up in the cookware industry. His grandparents started
Harbour, a Boston-based commercial foodservice company, in the 1920s. He and Malt have known each other since they were 5 years old
and growing up in Boston, but they stayed in touch as they started their careers.




Kalick worked in food, first in restaurants and then for his family’s business. Malt was working for a direct-to-consumer
apparel company and had millennials’ buying habits on his mind.

“Have you ever thought about kitchen tools?” he asked Kalick one day a few years ago.

That was the start of what became Made In. Over two years, the friends-turned-business partners dug into the supply chain
to find U.S. manufacturers to products the sauce and saute pans they wanted to sell. Kalick knew the markups that were built
into the price of the familiar brands, such as All-Clad, so he knew they could increase the quality — and keep manufacturing
in the U.S. — by selling to customers directly. Pots and pans might be heavy, but they are relatively easy to ship.

But before they started designing the product line, the company surveyed 100 cooks about what they knew and didn’t know about
pots and pans. “Nobody had brand affinity and everyone was waiting until they were married” to buy them, Kalick says. Customers
didn’t want the handles to get hot and they didn’t like the current handles on the market, so they engineered slightly slimmer
handles that don’t get so hot.


With bright colors and thoughtful design, Made In is trying to capture the millennial market of cooks who need kitchen gear.
Contributed by Made In.

The founders say it was an easy decision to base their company in Austin. They looked at Los Angeles and Miami, but Kalick
says the thriving start-up and food communities in Austin — “the Brooklyn of America,” he says. They moved here in early 2017
and, by September, they were shipping pots and pans across the country.

Having spent so much time in the cookware industry, Kalick puts an emphasis on transparency around what the pans are made
of and where the materials come from. “Transparency is a big thing for direct to consumer in general, which is why we explain
why we source 430 stainless steel from Kentucky or 304 (stainless steel) from Pennsylvania that has nickel that helps resist
corrosion.”

Kalick might have the background in cookware, but Malt says he considers himself the target demographic: He cooks three times
a week and doesn’t shy away from calling himself a “foodie.” He still eats at restaurants but also entertains at home.

But selling cookware to millennials is quite different than selling clothing. “In the apparel world, our primary problem was
to have people trade away from brands they already love. In this space, it’s a completely different challenge. You go to a
23-year-old and say ‘All-Clad,’ they give you a blank stare.”


Some of the pots and pans from Made In have a traditional look, but they are designed to compete with the high-end brands
on the market. Contributed by Made In.

Millennials might not be buying homes as fast as generations before them, but they are investing in the stuff in their homes,
Malt says, and they are always looking for an excuse to get together. When the founders both lived in New York City after
college, they hosted monthly dinner parties for their friends. Food was how they kept their friendship going as they both
worked for other companies.

“One of our big missions is bringing back the dinner party,” says Kalick. “We want to encourage people to host get-togethers.
Some of the most fun nights are going to a dinner party to eat and drink and with someone who does it right.”

That’s when the pots and pans come in. Although experienced cooks like Malt and Kalick can differentiate between high-end
and low-end cookware, many beginning cooks can’t. But having good gear “helps you look like you know what you’re doing,” Kalick
says.

Twenty- and thirty-something cooks aren’t the only shoppers who need new pots and pans, of course. Even if the prices might
seem high to first-time buyers (
$79 for a 10-inch non-stick frying pan,
$155 for an 8-quart stock pot), Baby Boomers who already have some high-end gear in their kitchen see value in Made In’s induction-capable product line,
Malt says.


A nice set of pots and pans is something that many people used to wait until they got married to buy, but millennials are
changing American buying habits, including cookware. Contributed by Made In.

Within the general categories of stock pot, saute pans, saucier, sauce pan and frying pan, the company sells about 30 different
products in various colors, sizes and finishes, and the majority of sales come from the kits that bundle several pans together.

One question they often get is about the safety of non-stick pans. Malt says the fear of nonstick coating is outdated. Decades
ago, American consumers heard a lot about a Teflon as a possible carcinogen, but
the specific chemical that was of concern — PFOA — is no longer used in Teflon, he says.

However, the concern over Teflon helped the industry find better ways to create a nonstick surface that doesn’t chip or scratch
as easily. Made In works with a company in Pennsylvania, which applies three coats of an FDA-approved PTFE, which creates
a durable nonstick surface that won’t easily scratch or chip.

Because Malt and Kalick are making Instagram-worthy cooking gear for an Instagram-loving generation, the pans come in several
colors, including options for blue and graphic nonstick options. They’ll eventually sell chef’s knives and other kitchen gear,
but for now, look out for a specialty cookware line this fall featuring designs from the Austin-based illustrator Will Bryant.


Each Made In pan comes with a recipe etched onto the bottom. Contributed by Made In.

All Made In pots and pans come with a recipe on the bottom, which might seem like an odd place to put a recipe that you might
need to reference while you’re cooking, but Malt says the recipe becomes a talking point for cooks.

“I can’t remember when I looked at the bottom of the pan and had any feeling at all,” Malt says. “It sparks conversation.
We just wanted to do something different. We didn’t start this business to do things the way people have always done it.”

Category: Cookware Pots  Tags: ,  Comments off