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August 2, 2018 |

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So you want a new kitchen? Tips for starting the process

So you want a new kitchen? Whether you’re considering designing a kitchen using your own architect, a kitchen planner hired through a store like IKEA or Home Depot, or an online planning service, professionals suggest keeping a few things in mind.

Plan ahead, plan way ahead

“Many people start planning their kitchen a year ahead of time, and that’s about right,” says John Allen, a services planner at IKEA in the United States. “The more you’ve worked out what you want ahead of time, the more smoothly things will go once you start working with a kitchen planner.”

Be as specific as you can about what you like and how much you can spend.

“If you already know exactly which appliances you want, and what kind of sink, that helps a lot,” Allen says. Changing a fridge or range halfway through the planning can throw everything off, since even an inch or two difference in appliance dimensions could mean rethinking all the cabinets.

Make your kitchen work for you

Do you have kids? Are you right-handed or left-handed? Will more than one person be cooking at the same time?

The answers to questions like these affect the placement of microwave, dishwasher, sink, cabinet, kitchen island and more. “If you’re 5 feet tall, 40-inch cabinets may not be ideal for you,” Allen says.

And just because you’re going with one company for kitchen planning and cabinet boxes doesn’t mean you can’t use another for cabinet and drawer fronts, decorative drawer pulls and more.

For example, Semihandmade, a Los Angeles company, makes cabinets, drawer fronts and accessories specifically made to fit IKEA cabinet boxes. Company founder John McDonald says he can offer more upscale veneers “and can manage a lot of customization work that Ikea can’t do, like special door sizes, doors for appliance fronts, and custom bookcases to match cabinetry.”

Consider resale value, especially with floors and countertops

Even if going with a laminate countertop seems tempting and more affordable in the short term, consider the impact your choices will make on the eventual resale value of your home. “People move a lot these days, and countertops and flooring always come up in home ads,” Allen says.

Measure, and measure again

“There’s a saying that goes ‘measure twice, cut once.’ Well for kitchens, I’d say measure three times,” Allen warns. “No matter how new or old your house is, chances are things aren’t quite even. And you’ll need to measure outlets and vents and window frames as well.”

There’s more involved than meets the eye, and it often pays to hire a professional to measure the room.

“The foundation of everything you do is getting accurate and comprehensive measurements up front,” says Rachel Getz, associate merchant in countertops at Home Depot. For between $99 and $129, Home Depot will send a service provider to measure the kitchen and design the project. IKEA will have your site professionally measured and designed for a refundable $199.

“No matter who’s doing your kitchen, it’s worth it to invest a few hundred dollars up front to get things properly measured,” says McDonald.

Know when to cut corners and when to leave it to the pros

“When clients propose installing their own kitchen, I like to ask them if they installed their own water heater or did their own roofing,” says Allen. “If the answer is yes, they can probably manage it. If not, they may want to reconsider.”

To save money, he suggest, homeowners might do the disassembly and painting themselves, leaving the installation to the pros.

Be realistic about time frame

Dismantling and preparing the kitchen and flooring ahead of installation will take time. Contractors often take longer than expected, and plumbers and electricians aren’t always available on the day you’ll need them. And even with perfect turnaround time, custom countertops will take at least two weeks, the experts say, and can’t be templated until the cabinets have been installed.

Have an alternative space set up with a microwave, tabletop and small fridge; you’ll need a place to prepare food while your dream kitchen is in the works.

“It’s important to remember that you’re likely to encounter roadblocks that may extend the timeline,” says Stephanie Sisco, home editor at Real Simple magazine. “Whether it’s a surprise that’s uncovered when a wall is opened up or a change is made to the design plan, it can delay your renovation’s progress. So give yourself some wiggle room and don’t plan a party for the day you think it’s going to be completed.”

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Doc: Nonstick cooking pans not source of pairs’ cancers

Dear Dr. Roach: I recently was diagnosed with kidney cancer, and my wife is now getting treatment for breast cancer. Would cooking on a nonstick skillet have caused the cancers? My wife was using one for quite some time, but not anymore.

B.R.

Dear B.R.: When someone is diagnosed with a serious disease, but especially cancer, it is a human trait to think of possible causes. We want to have as much control over our fate as possible. However, most cases of cancer occur without a specific risk (smoking cigarettes is the biggest exception to this). Cancer happens, among other reasons, when there is an error in replicating DNA, when we are hit by natural radiation or when something in our environment damages our DNA. There certainly are behaviors we can do to reduce cancer risk, but there is no way to entirely prevent cancer from occurring.

In the case of nonstick cookware, there is no increased risk. Workers who make nonstick coatings for pans or clothing are potentially at risk due to a chemical used in manufacturing called PFOA, but there is none of this (probably) carcinogenic chemical in the final product. Overheating a nonstick-coated pan can cause irritating, but not cancer-causing, chemical fumes.

Dear Dr. Roach: I have a question that I’d love to see answered in your column sometime. My husband recently had major surgery. Before the surgery, they asked if he has ever smoked. (Husband is 77.) He answered that when he was 9, he smoked a cigarette. He is now in the computer as an ex-smoker, and the nurse told us she is “required by law” to provide him with information on quitting.

When physicians ask, “Have you ever smoked?” do they really want to hear about one cigarette, smoked almost 70 years ago? Is this meaningful information, in medical terms?

S.S.

Dear S.S.: There are very important reasons to know a person’s smoking history, especially when someone is about to undergo surgery. Current smokers should know that quitting well before surgery can reduce risks of surgical complications. The anesthesiologist can be extra-vigilant for breathing issues. Some of these points are valid for ex-smokers who have recently quit or who were very heavy smokers.

Of course, a cigarette at age 9 is meaningless, and when I hear “required by law” I wonder if it’s really true. In this case, I doubt it: Why give ex-smokers information on quitting? It makes no sense.

Primary care providers like me ask about smoking because a significant history of smoking increases heart disease risk, so I might be more likely to recommend treatment to reduce that risk (for example, in a person with elevated blood pressure or cholesterol who otherwise doesn’t quite meet criteria for drug treatment). Also, people who smoked more than 1 pack per day for 30 years, or the equivalent, should have a discussion about whether screening for lung cancer is appropriate.

Finally, it’s easier to answer if you have never been a smoker. Some people who smoke socially don’t consider themselves smokers, but would still benefit from advice to stop.

Email questions to ToYourGoodHealth@med.cornell.edu.

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My new favorite stand mixer is from a surprising brand — and it’s compatible with all of my KitchenAid attachments


The Kenmore Elite Ovation 5-Quart Stand Mixer has been the crown jewel of my kitchen for the past week, and I hope for the rest of my life.

The Elite Ovation checks all of the boxes you want in a high-end stand mixer: a 10-speed, 500-watt motor, a 5-quart glass mixing bowl, and a set of attachments, including a wire whisk, dough hook, and flat beater. Most of those features are also present in the KitchenAid 5-Quart Artisan Mixer , except the KitchenAid’s mixing bowl is made out of stainless steel.

To set itself apart from its highly popular contemporary, Kenmore designed the Elite Ovation specifically to make baking quicker, easier, and less messy.


YouTube / Kenmore

A splatter guard attaches to the top of the mixer and sits flush with the mixing bowl when you lower it down. This creates a strong seal so that dry ingredients like flour don’t get everywhere when you first turn on the mixer, especially if you’re combining them at a high speed. I used to run my KitchenAid mixer at a lower speed to avoid making a mess, which wasted time.

A built-in LED light comes on when you start the machine, which makes it way easier to keep an eye on the consistency of your batter if you’re baking in an apartment with dim lights. I used to bring my KitchenAid mixer closer to my oven and use its overhead light, but this solution works significantly better.

Both of those features make a big difference when you’re baking, but this stand mixer’s most noteworthy feature is its pour-in top, which lets you add ingredients while the mixer is on, without making a mess . You can add ingredients directly, or by using an included funnel that will keep the top of the mixer clean, and guide your ingredients down more easily.

I’ve made banana bread, cookie dough, and brownies using the mixer, and each time I’ve been impressed at how spotless my countertops were afterward. The mixer was powerful enough to break up whole bananas as I stuck them through its top slot, and I never had any ingredients or batter fly out, or even drip down from the splatter guard.

Regardless of how full the bowl was, and the speed or tool I was using, the batters and dough stayed in the mixing bowl, which let me make a double batch of banana bread in under 10 minutes. The faster you run the mixer, the more thoroughly it breaks down and combines your ingredients, even if they’re solid, like bananas and chocolate chips.



YouTube / Kenmore

One of the things that makes KitchenAid Mixers so valuable is the plethora of attachments you can use with it. Instead of buying a standalone meat grinder , pasta maker , or ice cream maker , you can use the power of the mixer to do the heavy lifting, and save yourself kitchen space and money.

I own the pasta maker attachment, so I was very happy to discover that Kenmore built a compatible port into the side of its mixer.

You don’t have to choose between the Elite Ovation’s smart design and a KitchenAid mixer’s multi-functionality — you can literally have your cake and eat it, too.



YouTube / Kenmore

A stand mixer is a purchase you’re probably only going to make once, and a good one will cost you a pretty penny.

Make no mistake, Kenmore’s Elite Ovation stand mixer is expensive at $350, but it’s very much in line with what you’d spend on a competitor’s high-end mixer — and as far as I’m concerned, it’s totally worth its high price for all of the convenience and ease of use it offers home cooks.

Kenmore Elite Ovation 5 Quart Stand Mixer in Burgundy, $355.96, available at Amazon

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Sur La Table Turns Up The Heat In The Kitchen, Unveils New Collaboration With SCANPAN

Stratanium+®, Scanpan’s first-ever commercial-grade nonstick coating, provides an almost indestructible nonstick micro-texture surface that sears food like stainless steel and provides effortless release for easy serving and cleanup. The efficient 5-ply construction provides quick and even heat distribution, delivering an experience that is truly nonstick without compromise.

“Since 2008 we have collaborated with Sur La Table to bring the industry’s most innovative nonstick cookware to market. CS+ represents another milestone in this mission. The textured surface of STRATANIUM+ is a commercial grade offering. It’s the toughest nonstick surface we have ever manufactured, while still providing exceptional release for ease of use. It’s durable, safe and sustainable nonstick for healthier cooking.” said Jesper Brund, President CEO, Scanpan.

The CS+ collection also is packed with thoughtful, exclusive features that make life in the kitchen even easier. Large, comfortable ergonomic handles feature new stay-cool technology. Snug-fitting glass lids seal in flavor while offering 20% more viewing space and make it easy to keep an eye on the food you’re cooking. All pans and lids are completely dishwasher safe for easy cleanup.  

“We are constantly working with our partners to develop new, innovative products that help customers become more confident in the kitchen” said Billy May, CEO, Sur La Table, “Our collaboration with Scanpan and the new CS+ collection totally delivers on that mission with an unsurpassed cooking experience.”

Made in Denmark exclusively for Sur La Table, The SCANPAN® CS+ is the first of its kind and comes with a lifetime warranty. There’s a piece in the SCANPAN® CS+ Collection for every cook. To learn more about this advanced cookware, please click here.

Prices for the collection are as follows:

10-Piece Set: Sugg. $1,824.00, Reg. $999.95; 11″ Skillet: Sugg. $253.00, Great Deal: $99.96; 8″ and 10 ¼” Skillet Set: Sugg. $421.00, Great Deal $199.96; 7 ½ – Quart Dutch Oven: Sugg. $450.00, Reg. $349.95; 3-Quart Sauté Pan: Sugg. $420.00, Great Deal $199.96; 12 ½” Wok: Sugg. $345.00, Reg. $279.95; 12 ½” Chef’s Pan: Sugg. $400.00, Reg. $299.95; 4-Quart Deep Sauté Pan: Sugg. $490, Great Deal $249.96; Saucepans: 2-qt. Sugg. $250.00, Reg. $179.95 or 4-qt. Sugg. $315.00, Reg. $229.95; Additional Skillet Sizes: 8″ Sugg. $182.00, Reg. $129.95, 9 ½” Sugg. $225.00, Reg. $159.95, or 12 ¼” Sugg. $277.00, Reg. $199.95.         

About SCANPAN:

For more than 60 years, SCANPAN has inspired a love of food and makes uncompromising kitchenware for modern kitchens. SCANPAN is 100% Danish-owned, with the company’s headquarters and factory located near Aarhus, Denmark, and distribution in more than 50 countries worldwide.

About SUR LA TABLE:

Founded in 1972 at Seattle’s historic Pike Place Market, Sur La Table is the trusted resource for customers passionate about cooking and entertaining.  The company’s catalog of products encompasses cookware, kitchen electrics, tools and gadgets, cutlery, bakeware, tabletop, glassware, and locally sourced food and accessories, available in over 130 locations nationwide as well as online at www.surlatable.com  The company also operates the largest non-professional cooking school in the United States, with kitchens inside 80+ stores where cooks from beginner to advanced can take a cooking class, build skills, and get inspired to live a better life thru cooking. Follow Sur La Table on Facebook, Instagram, Pinterest, and YouTube.

MEDIA CONTACT:

Razonia McClellan

Phone: 806.370.3820 / Cell: 432.352.7477

Email: razonia@razoniapr.com

SOURCE Sur La Table

Related Links

http://www.surlatable.com

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Sur La Table Turns Up The Heat In The Kitchen, Unveils New Collaboration With SCANPAN

SEATTLE, Aug. 2, 2018 /PRNewswire/ – Sur La Table is excited to announce its newest, exclusive cookware collaboration, SCANPAN® CS+ featuring the most advanced nonstick surface available on the market today. Launched in July, CS+raises the bar in every way, fusing revolutionary new nonstick Stratanium+®, with brushed stainless exteriors for cookware as beautiful as it is functional.

Stratanium+®, Scanpan’s first-ever commercial-grade nonstick coating, provides an almost indestructible nonstick micro-texture surfacethat sears food like stainless steel and provides effortless release for easy serving and cleanup. The efficient 5-ply construction provides quick and even heat distribution, delivering an experience that is truly nonstick without compromise.

“Since 2008 we have collaborated with Sur La Table to bring the industry’s most innovative nonstick cookware to market. CS+ represents another milestone in this mission. The textured surface of STRATANIUM+ is a commercial grade offering. It’s the toughest nonstick surface we have ever manufactured, while still providing exceptional release for ease of use. It’s durable, safe and sustainable nonstick for healthier cooking.” said Jesper Brund, President CEO, Scanpan.

The CS+ collection also is packed with thoughtful, exclusive features that make life in the kitchen even easier. Large, comfortable ergonomic handles feature new stay-cool technology. Snug-fitting glass lids seal in flavor while offering 20% more viewing space and make it easy to keep an eye on the food you’re cooking. All pans and lids are completely dishwasher safe for easy cleanup.  

“We are constantly working with our partners to develop new, innovative products that help customers become more confident in the kitchen” said Billy May, CEO, Sur La Table, “Our collaboration with Scanpan and the new CS+ collection totally delivers on that mission with an unsurpassed cooking experience.”

Made in Denmark exclusively for Sur La Table, The SCANPAN® CS+ is the first of its kind and comes with a lifetime warranty. There’s a piece in the SCANPAN® CS+ Collection for every cook. To learn more about this advanced cookware, please click here.

Prices for the collection are as follows:

10-Piece Set: Sugg. $1,824.00, Reg. $999.95; 11″ Skillet: Sugg. $253.00, Great Deal: $99.96; 8″ and 10 ¼” Skillet Set: Sugg. $421.00, Great Deal $199.96; 7 ½ – Quart Dutch Oven: Sugg. $450.00, Reg. $349.95; 3-Quart Sauté Pan: Sugg. $420.00, Great Deal $199.96; 12 ½” Wok: Sugg. $345.00, Reg. $279.95; 12 ½” Chef’s Pan: Sugg. $400.00, Reg. $299.95; 4-Quart Deep Sauté Pan: Sugg. $490, Great Deal $249.96; Saucepans: 2-qt. Sugg. $250.00, Reg. $179.95 or 4-qt. Sugg. $315.00, Reg. $229.95; Additional Skillet Sizes: 8″ Sugg. $182.00, Reg. $129.95, 9 ½” Sugg. $225.00, Reg. $159.95, or 12 ¼” Sugg. $277.00, Reg. $199.95.         

About SCANPAN:

For more than 60 years, SCANPAN has inspired a love of food and makes uncompromising kitchenware for modern kitchens. SCANPAN is 100% Danish-owned, with the company’s headquarters and factory located near Aarhus, Denmark, and distribution in more than 50 countries worldwide.

About SUR LA TABLE:

Founded in 1972 at Seattle’s historic Pike Place Market, Sur La Table is the trusted resource for customers passionate about cooking and entertaining.  The company’s catalog of products encompasses cookware, kitchen electrics, tools and gadgets, cutlery, bakeware, tabletop, glassware, and locally sourced food and accessories, available in over 130 locations nationwide as well as online at www.surlatable.com  The company also operates the largest non-professional cooking school in the United States, with kitchens inside 80+ stores where cooks from beginner to advanced can take a cooking class, build skills, and get inspired to live a better life thru cooking. Follow Sur La Table on Facebook, Instagram, Pinterest, and YouTube.

MEDIA CONTACT:
Razonia McClellan
Phone: 806.370.3820 / Cell: 432.352.7477
Email: razonia@razoniapr.com

View original content with multimedia:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/sur-la-table-turns-up-the-heat-in-the-kitchen-unveils-new-collaboration-with-scanpan-300690586.html

SOURCE Sur La Table

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Want a new kitchen?

So you want a new kitchen? Whether you’re considering designing a kitchen using your own architect, a kitchen planner hired through a store such as IKEA or Home Depot, or an online planning service, professionals suggest keeping a few things in mind.

• Plan ahead, plan way ahead: “Many people start planning their kitchen a year ahead of time, and that’s about right,” says John Allen, a services planner at IKEA in the United States. “The more you’ve worked out what you want ahead of time, the more smoothly things will go once you start working with a kitchen planner.”

Be as specific as you can about what you like and how much you can spend.

“If you already know exactly which appliances you want, and what kind of sink, that helps a lot,” Allen says. Changing a fridge or range halfway through the planning can throw everything off, since even an inch or two difference in appliance dimensions could mean rethinking all the cabinets.

• Make your kitchen work for you: Do you have kids? Are you right-handed or left-handed? Will more than one person be cooking at the same time?

The answers to questions like these affect the placement of microwave, dishwasher, sink, cabinet, kitchen island and more. “If you’re 5 feet tall, 40-inch cabinets may not be ideal for you,” Allen says.

And just because you’re going with one company for kitchen planning and cabinet boxes doesn’t mean you can’t use another for cabinet and drawer fronts, decorative drawer pulls and more.

For example, Semihandmade, a Los Angeles company, makes cabinets, drawer fronts and accessories specifically made to fit IKEA cabinet boxes. Company founder John McDonald says he can offer more upscale veneers “and can manage a lot of customization work that Ikea can’t do, like special door sizes, doors for appliance fronts, and custom bookcases to match cabinetry.”

• Consider resale value, especially with floors and countertops: Even if going with a laminate countertop seems tempting and more affordable in the short term, consider the impact your choices will make on the eventual resale value of your home. “People move a lot these days, and countertops and flooring always come up in home ads,” Allen says.

• Measure, and measure again: “There’s a saying that goes ‘measure twice, cut once.’ Well for kitchens, I’d say measure three times,” Allen warns. “No matter how new or old your house is, chances are things aren’t quite even. And you’ll need to measure outlets and vents and window frames as well.”

There’s more involved than meets the eye, and it often pays to hire a professional to measure the room.

“The foundation of everything you do is getting accurate and comprehensive measurements up front,” says Rachel Getz, associate merchant in countertops at Home Depot. For between $99 and $129, Home Depot will send a service provider to measure the kitchen and design the project. IKEA will have your site professionally measured and designed for a refundable $199.

“No matter who’s doing your kitchen, it’s worth it to invest a few hundred dollars up front to get things properly measured,” says McDonald.

• Know when to cut corners and when to leave it to the pros: “When clients propose installing their own kitchen, I like to ask them if they installed their own water heater or did their own roofing,” says Allen. “If the answer is yes, they can probably manage it. If not, they may want to reconsider.”

To save money, he suggests, homeowners might do the disassembly and painting themselves, leaving the installation to the pros.

• Be realistic about time frame: Dismantling and preparing the kitchen and flooring ahead of installation will take time. Contractors often take longer than expected, and plumbers and electricians aren’t always available on the day you’ll need them. And even with perfect turnaround time, custom countertops will take at least two weeks, the experts say, and can’t be templated until the cabinets have been installed.

Have an alternative space set up with a microwave, tabletop and small fridge; you’ll need a place to prepare food while your dream kitchen is in the works.

“It’s important to remember that you’re likely to encounter roadblocks that may extend the timeline,” says Stephanie Sisco, home editor at Real Simple magazine. “Whether it’s a surprise that’s uncovered when a wall is opened up or a change is made to the design plan, it can delay your renovation’s progress. So give yourself some wiggle room and don’t plan a party for the day you think it’s going to be completed.”

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