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August 5, 2018 |

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So you want a new kitchen? Tips for starting the process | Home and …


+1 

This undated photo provided by Semihandmade shows a kitchen designed by Samantha Gluck. Semihandmade, a Los Angeles company, makes cabinets, drawer fronts and accessories specifically made to fit IKEA cabinet boxes. Whether you’re considering using your own architect, a kitchen planner hired through a store like IKEA or an online planning service, professionals suggest you start planning way ahead. Think about your specific needs. Measure well. And be realistic about how long it all will take.



So you want a new kitchen? Whether you’re considering designing a kitchen using your own architect, a kitchen planner hired through a store like IKEA or The Home Depot, or an online planning service, professionals suggest keeping a few things in mind.

Plan ahead, plan way ahead

“Many people start planning their kitchen a year ahead of time, and that’s about right,” says John Allen, a services planner at IKEA in the United States. “The more you’ve worked out what you want ahead of time, the more smoothly things will go once you start working with a kitchen planner.”

Be as specific as you can about what you like and how much you can spend.

“If you already know exactly which appliances you want, and what kind of sink, that helps a lot,” Allen says. Changing a fridge or range halfway through the planning can throw everything off, since even an inch or two difference in appliance dimensions could mean rethinking all the cabinets.

Make your kitchen work for you

Do you have kids? Are you right-handed or left-handed? Will more than one person be cooking at the same time?

The answers to questions like these affect the placement of microwave, dishwasher, sink, cabinet, kitchen island and more. “If you’re 5 feet tall, 40-inch cabinets may not be ideal for you,” Allen says.

And just because you’re going with one company for kitchen planning and cabinet boxes doesn’t mean you can’t use another for cabinet and drawer fronts, decorative drawer pulls and more.

For example, Semihandmade, a Los Angeles company, makes cabinets, drawer fronts and accessories specifically made to fit IKEA cabinet boxes. Company founder John McDonald says he can offer more upscale veneers “and can manage a lot of customization work that Ikea can’t do, like special door sizes, doors for appliance fronts, and custom bookcases to match cabinetry.”

Consider resale value, especially with floors, counter tops

Even if going with a laminate counter top seems tempting and more affordable in the short term, consider the impact your choices will make on the eventual resale value of your home. “People move a lot these days, and countertops and flooring always come up in home ads,” Allen says.

Measure, and measure again

“There’s a saying that goes ‘measure twice, cut once.’ Well for kitchens, I’d say measure three times,” Allen warns. “No matter how new or old your house is, chances are things aren’t quite even. And you’ll need to measure outlets and vents and window frames as well.”

There’s more involved than meets the eye, and it often pays to hire a professional to measure the room.

“The foundation of everything you do is getting accurate and comprehensive measurements up front,” says Rachel Getz, associate merchant in countertops at Home Depot. For between $99 and $129, Home Depot will send a service provider to measure the kitchen and design the project. IKEA will have your site professionally measured and designed for a refundable $199.

“No matter who’s doing your kitchen, it’s worth it to invest a few hundred dollars up front to get things properly measured,” says McDonald.


+1 

This photo provided by IKEA shows an IKEA designed kitchen.



Know when to cut corners, when to leave it to the pros

“When clients propose installing their own kitchen, I like to ask them if they installed their own water heater or did their own roofing,” says Allen. “If the answer is yes, they can probably manage it. If not, they may want to reconsider.”

To save money, he suggest, homeowners might do the disassembly and painting themselves, leaving the installation to the pros.

Be realistic about time frame

Dismantling and preparing the kitchen and flooring ahead of installation will take time. Contractors often take longer than expected, and plumbers and electricians aren’t always available on the day you’ll need them. And even with perfect turnaround time, custom countertops will take at least two weeks, the experts say, and can’t be templated until the cabinets have been installed.

Have an alternative space set up with a microwave, tabletop and small fridge; you’ll need a place to prepare food while your dream kitchen is in the works.

“It’s important to remember that you’re likely to encounter roadblocks that may extend the timeline,” says Stephanie Sisco, home editor at Real Simple magazine. “Whether it’s a surprise that’s uncovered when a wall is opened up or a change is made to the design plan, it can delay your renovation’s progress. So give yourself some wiggle room and don’t plan a party for the day you think it’s going to be completed.”

Category: Accessories  Tags: ,  Comments off

Compact campers | NWADG

As the fishing kayak turbocharged the boating industry, so has the off-road camper excited backcountry adventurers.

This group includes nonconsumptive adventurers such as mountain bikers, hikers and whitewater enthusiasts, but it increasingly includes kayak anglers and hunters who demand light camper trailers that can traverse rugged, undeveloped roads behind small vehicles powered by 4-cylinder motors.

The simplest of this camper class is essentially a hard-framed tent with amenities. It comfortably sleeps two and offers a place to prepare meals. From there, optional comfort upgrades are myriad.

Some compact campers masquerade as off-road models with aggressive graphics and accessories, but they might not be able to sustain the abuse of off-road camping. Dedicated models have, in addition to overall sturdy construction, heavy-duty suspension, full-size off-road tires, metal fender covers, diamond plate front guards and thick metal skin on the underside of the frame.

Here is a quick look at a few campers that meet that description.

Little Guy Teardrop

As its name suggests, Little Guy campers look like oversize teardrops.

Little Guys come in several configurations, including the 5-Wide, a model I’ve owned since 2016. It features a one-piece fiberglass body, metal underskin, heavy axle and full-size off-road tires. It has a metal rack on the front that spans the width of the body and holds my kitchen tote, a 55-quart cooler and other gear. A hitch receiver on the back will accept another luggage rack or a bike carrier.

Above the front grate are two ducts for an optional 5,000-btu Climate Right heating and air unit made especially for this trailer. It runs on 110-volt power, either from a 30-amp hookup or a 2,500-watt generator/inverter. The removable ductwork comes with the trailer and rides in the galley when not in use. A ceiling fan flows air in or out and eliminates the need for air conditioning except in extremely hot weather.

A car battery rides in a box near the tongue and solar panel plug. I bought a 15-watt panel and a charge regulator to keep the battery charged at all times.

Instead of a traditional ball hitch, my 5-Wide has an optional pintle hitch that does not torque at extreme angles the way a ball hitch does. It stays connected to the tow vehicle regardless of the terrain. The tongue weight is only 90 pounds.

Two LEDs supply bright interior lighting. Two LED strips on both sides provide bright exterior lighting. LEDs — light emitting diodes — are energy efficient and draw scant battery power. The taillights and license plate light are also LED.

Inside, two twin mattresses pressed side by side form a very comfortable full-size sleeping surface. Cabinetry toward the stern provides an impressive amount of storage space, but there is no hardware to secure items while underway.

The entire back of the camper lifts on hydraulic struts to expose a large galley area that holds a sink and propane stove on equipped models. Mine does not have the kitchen accessories. I use a dual burner Coleman propane stove. An LED in the hatch provides lighting, and there is also a 110-volt outlet.

Access is through two large doors on the sides. The doors are well sealed and have very dark, tinted glass. The bottom pane slides upward to provide ventilation. Each door locks, and blinds conceal the interior entirely from curious eyes. Folding cupholders are beside each door.

The Little Guy is quite a conversation piece. People ask to see inside everywhere I go.

Best of all, it is simple to set up. If I get tired while driving, I can pull into a rest area or parking lot, pull down the shades, lock the doors and nap securely.

NoBo

Some of the best conceived and designed new campers are the No Boundaries (No-Bo) models by Forest River. There are several models ranging from 10½ feet long to 19 feet, 7 inches, but the NoBo 10.5 conforms to the parameters of this article. There are two configurations. One offers a fold-down back panel that exposes the interior and allows you to use the camper as a toy hauler.

Like Little Guy, the NoBo 10.5 is an authentic off-road trailer with one-piece construction, aluminum frame, heavy duty axles and tires, and metal underskin.

Instead of two mattresses, it comes with square cushions that form a bed, sofa or chairs. This arrangement allows you to sit upright and is more versatile than Little Guy. A spacious storage in the back has restraints to keep items stationary. A flip-up table and cupholder are on the wall.

Under the mattresses is a trap door that accesses a storage area beneath the floor.

The exterior galley is ingenious. It contains a refrigerator/freezer, a two-burner propane stove, and wash pan on a slide that retracts into the body and locks when not in use. It also has a strut to stabilize the slide when extended. A spray hose attaches to a fitting on the side to wash dishes.

Inside the galley compartment is a monitor panel, light switches and a lockbox. The galley door also is lockable.

A 30-amp electric receptacle, solar plug-in and city water receptacle are conveniently located.

A low-profile, 13,500-btu Dometic air conditioner is mounted on top.

A really nice feature is a wraparound awning that tucks into a side-mounted pouch when not in use.

The NoBo 10.5 also comes with a 30-gallon fresh water tank. The hitch weight of the two models is 198 pounds and 210 pounds, respectively.

The standard Discoverer Package comes with an integral JBL FLIP 4 bluetooth speaker with cradle mount, complete interior and exterior lighting, and Xtreme Ply roof material.

The optional Overlander Package includes a Rhino rack system, Vortex bars and a Rhino J-Cradle system for your kayaks, and also a wheel step.

The graphics are distinctive and very attractive.

Flagstaff E-Pro

Squarely between the Little Guy and NoBo is Flagstaff’s contribution to this genre, the E-Pro 12RK Ultralight. At 12 feet, it is a little longer and taller than the NoBo and Little Guy, but it is also considerably less expensive than the other comparable models.

The E-Pro weighs 1,150 pounds empty, and its tongue weight is 153 pounds. Like Little Guy, the interior is for sleeping only and contains a single heated queen mattress. Storage areas fore and aft do not impinge on headroom or legroom.

There is an interior speaker, AM-FM, CD, DVD and bluetooth player, TV hookup, directional TV antenna and a Wi-Fi range booster.

The camper comes with a two-way vent fan, but you can also get an optional 11,000-btu low-profile, roof-mount air conditioner.

Like Little Guy, the E-pro has a large galley in the back that contains a microwave oven, refrigerator and sink. The fridge runs on a 300-watt inverter that comes with the unit. Also in the galley is a monitor panel that shows you the battery status and water storage levels. The fresh water tank holds 20 gallons.

A retractable platform on the side holds a two burner cooktop and prep table that store in the galley when not in use.

Like the NoBo, it has a city water hookup, and also a cable TV hookup.

Its graphics are attractive.

The author’s Little Guy 5-Wide Rough Rider is designed for off-road camping but is also at home in developed campgrounds. With its pintle hitch, enclo…

The author’s Little Guy 5-Wide Rough Rider is designed for off-road camping but is also at home in developed campgrounds. With its pintle hitch, enclo…

Sports on 08/05/2018

Category: Accessories  Tags: ,  Comments off

Sounds of Summer – MyAJC.com

Story by ADRIANNE MURCHISON 

While some outdoor concert series are winding down for the unofficial end of summer, others on the Northside continue into September, and even October.

Here’s a rundown of music stylings that you can look forward to.

1. Home by Dark Series – Chukkar Farm. Guest country music singer-songwriters join Home by Dark musicians including host and drummer James Casto. Nashville-based artists Rebecca Correia, Cindy Morgan and Danny Mitchell are upcoming performers at the landscaped farm that overlooks a polo field. The venue opens 90 minutes before showtime. Tables are at the ready for concert-goers’ dinnerware, food and beverages. Ticket prices range from $23 for general admission to $393 for a table for 10. 1140 Liberty Grove Road, Alpharetta. 675-665-0040.homebydark.com

2. Home by Dark Series – Brook Street Park. James Casto performs with his fellow Home by Dark musicians and background singers in free concerts in the heart of Alpharetta’s new City Center development. Country music singer-songwriter Victoria Banks, a Canadian Country Music Award winner, joins the band in September. East Lawn at City Hall, 2 Park Plaza, Alpharetta. 675-665-0040. homebydark.com

3. Summer Concert Series – Johns Creek. Longtime Atlanta rockers Banks and Shane perform in the weekend music series in September. Johns Creek Symphony Orchestra closes out the event in October at the Mark Burkhalter Park Amphitheater. Food trucks will park nearby, and beer and wine will be for sale. 3150 Old Alabama Road. 678-512-3261. johnscreekga.gov

4. Riverside Sounds Concert Series – Riverside Park. The Roosevelts, a Nashville-based alternative rock/pop band performs in the concert series on Sept. 1. That show is followed up in October with the Dustbowl Revival. The versatile eight-member group has received critical acclaim for sounds that move from country to rock to soulful and funky. 575 Riverside Road, Roswell. 770-641-3705. roswellgov.com

5. Sundays on the River – Chattahoochee Nature Center. Serenity sets the stage for Sunday evening concerts. Tour the grounds before the show, lay out your blankets and unpack your basket of delectable delights, or grab an available table. Alcoholic beverages are not allowed, however a cash bar will be open. The Electromatics, as well as Ben Sollee and Kentucky Native, perform the final two shows of the season. 9135 Willeo Road, Roswell. 770-992-2055. chattnaturecenter.org

6. Glover Park Concert Series – Marietta Square. The final two concerts of the season bring a dance party with the Crystal Clear Band and soulful soft rock performed by the Mustangs. Blankets and lawn chairs are welcome. Reserved tables for six and eight people are available for $55 and $65, respectively. Historic Marietta Square, 50 N. Park Square, Marietta. 770-794-5601. mariettaga.gov

7. Concerts by the Springs – Heritage Sandy Springs. If you loved the ’80s, pop tribute band Electric Avenue will be quite a treat in August, bringing tunes by the likes of Wham!, INXS, Duran Duran and even David Bowie. In September, here comes Bogey and the Viceroy band with song list that shifts from “Fly Me to the Moon” to hits by Earth, Wind and Fire and Cheap Trick. The concert is held on the Sandy Springs Society Entertainment Lawn and stage. 6110 Blue Stone Road, Sandy Springs. 404-851-1111. heritagesandysprings.org

8. Summer Concert Series – Norcoss. Get ready to rock on as Departure: The Journey Tribute Band and A1A: The Official and Original Jimmy Buffett Tribute Show come to the Thrasher Park amphitheater for final performances of the music series. 93 Park Drive, Norcross. 678-421-2000. norcrossga.net



Category: Dinnerware  Tags: ,  Comments off

So you want a new kitchen? Tips for starting the process


+1 

This undated photo provided by Semihandmade shows a kitchen designed by Samantha Gluck. Semihandmade, a Los Angeles company, makes cabinets, drawer fronts and accessories specifically made to fit IKEA cabinet boxes. Whether you’re considering using your own architect, a kitchen planner hired through a store like IKEA or an online planning service, professionals suggest you start planning way ahead. Think about your specific needs. Measure well. And be realistic about how long it all will take.



So you want a new kitchen? Whether you’re considering designing a kitchen using your own architect, a kitchen planner hired through a store like IKEA or The Home Depot, or an online planning service, professionals suggest keeping a few things in mind.

Plan ahead, plan way ahead

“Many people start planning their kitchen a year ahead of time, and that’s about right,” says John Allen, a services planner at IKEA in the United States. “The more you’ve worked out what you want ahead of time, the more smoothly things will go once you start working with a kitchen planner.”

Be as specific as you can about what you like and how much you can spend.

“If you already know exactly which appliances you want, and what kind of sink, that helps a lot,” Allen says. Changing a fridge or range halfway through the planning can throw everything off, since even an inch or two difference in appliance dimensions could mean rethinking all the cabinets.

Make your kitchen work for you

Do you have kids? Are you right-handed or left-handed? Will more than one person be cooking at the same time?

The answers to questions like these affect the placement of microwave, dishwasher, sink, cabinet, kitchen island and more. “If you’re 5 feet tall, 40-inch cabinets may not be ideal for you,” Allen says.

And just because you’re going with one company for kitchen planning and cabinet boxes doesn’t mean you can’t use another for cabinet and drawer fronts, decorative drawer pulls and more.

For example, Semihandmade, a Los Angeles company, makes cabinets, drawer fronts and accessories specifically made to fit IKEA cabinet boxes. Company founder John McDonald says he can offer more upscale veneers “and can manage a lot of customization work that Ikea can’t do, like special door sizes, doors for appliance fronts, and custom bookcases to match cabinetry.”

Consider resale value, especially with floors, counter tops

Even if going with a laminate counter top seems tempting and more affordable in the short term, consider the impact your choices will make on the eventual resale value of your home. “People move a lot these days, and countertops and flooring always come up in home ads,” Allen says.

Measure, and measure again

“There’s a saying that goes ‘measure twice, cut once.’ Well for kitchens, I’d say measure three times,” Allen warns. “No matter how new or old your house is, chances are things aren’t quite even. And you’ll need to measure outlets and vents and window frames as well.”

There’s more involved than meets the eye, and it often pays to hire a professional to measure the room.

“The foundation of everything you do is getting accurate and comprehensive measurements up front,” says Rachel Getz, associate merchant in countertops at Home Depot. For between $99 and $129, Home Depot will send a service provider to measure the kitchen and design the project. IKEA will have your site professionally measured and designed for a refundable $199.

“No matter who’s doing your kitchen, it’s worth it to invest a few hundred dollars up front to get things properly measured,” says McDonald.


+1 

This photo provided by IKEA shows an IKEA designed kitchen.



Know when to cut corners, when to leave it to the pros

“When clients propose installing their own kitchen, I like to ask them if they installed their own water heater or did their own roofing,” says Allen. “If the answer is yes, they can probably manage it. If not, they may want to reconsider.”

To save money, he suggest, homeowners might do the disassembly and painting themselves, leaving the installation to the pros.

Be realistic about time frame

Dismantling and preparing the kitchen and flooring ahead of installation will take time. Contractors often take longer than expected, and plumbers and electricians aren’t always available on the day you’ll need them. And even with perfect turnaround time, custom countertops will take at least two weeks, the experts say, and can’t be templated until the cabinets have been installed.

Have an alternative space set up with a microwave, tabletop and small fridge; you’ll need a place to prepare food while your dream kitchen is in the works.

“It’s important to remember that you’re likely to encounter roadblocks that may extend the timeline,” says Stephanie Sisco, home editor at Real Simple magazine. “Whether it’s a surprise that’s uncovered when a wall is opened up or a change is made to the design plan, it can delay your renovation’s progress. So give yourself some wiggle room and don’t plan a party for the day you think it’s going to be completed.”

Category: Accessories  Tags: ,  Comments off

Compact campers

As the fishing kayak turbocharged the boating industry, so has the off-road camper excited backcountry adventurers.

This group includes nonconsumptive adventurers such as mountain bikers, hikers and whitewater enthusiasts, but it increasingly includes kayak anglers and hunters who demand light camper trailers that can traverse rugged, undeveloped roads behind small vehicles powered by 4-cylinder motors.

The simplest of this camper class is essentially a hard-framed tent with amenities. It comfortably sleeps two and offers a place to prepare meals. From there, optional comfort upgrades are myriad.

Some compact campers masquerade as off-road models with aggressive graphics and accessories, but they might not be able to sustain the abuse of off-road camping. Dedicated models have, in addition to overall sturdy construction, heavy-duty suspension, full-size off-road tires, metal fender covers, diamond plate front guards and thick metal skin on the underside of the frame.

Here is a quick look at a few campers that meet that description.

Little Guy Teardrop

As its name suggests, Little Guy campers look like oversize teardrops.

Little Guys come in several configurations, including the 5-Wide, a model I’ve owned since 2016. It features a one-piece fiberglass body, metal underskin, heavy axle and full-size off-road tires. It has a metal rack on the front that spans the width of the body and holds my kitchen tote, a 55-quart cooler and other gear. A hitch receiver on the back will accept another luggage rack or a bike carrier.

Above the front grate are two ducts for an optional 5,000-btu Climate Right heating and air unit made especially for this trailer. It runs on 110-volt power, either from a 30-amp hookup or a 2,500-watt generator/inverter. The removable ductwork comes with the trailer and rides in the galley when not in use. A ceiling fan flows air in or out and eliminates the need for air conditioning except in extremely hot weather.

A car battery rides in a box near the tongue and solar panel plug. I bought a 15-watt panel and a charge regulator to keep the battery charged at all times.

Instead of a traditional ball hitch, my 5-Wide has an optional pintle hitch that does not torque at extreme angles the way a ball hitch does. It stays connected to the tow vehicle regardless of the terrain. The tongue weight is only 90 pounds.

Two LEDs supply bright interior lighting. Two LED strips on both sides provide bright exterior lighting. LEDs — light emitting diodes — are energy efficient and draw scant battery power. The taillights and license plate light are also LED.

Inside, two twin mattresses pressed side by side form a very comfortable full-size sleeping surface. Cabinetry toward the stern provides an impressive amount of storage space, but there is no hardware to secure items while underway.

The entire back of the camper lifts on hydraulic struts to expose a large galley area that holds a sink and propane stove on equipped models. Mine does not have the kitchen accessories. I use a dual burner Coleman propane stove. An LED in the hatch provides lighting, and there is also a 110-volt outlet.

Access is through two large doors on the sides. The doors are well sealed and have very dark, tinted glass. The bottom pane slides upward to provide ventilation. Each door locks, and blinds conceal the interior entirely from curious eyes. Folding cupholders are beside each door.

The Little Guy is quite a conversation piece. People ask to see inside everywhere I go.

Best of all, it is simple to set up. If I get tired while driving, I can pull into a rest area or parking lot, pull down the shades, lock the doors and nap securely.

NoBo

Some of the best conceived and designed new campers are the No Boundaries (No-Bo) models by Forest River. There are several models ranging from 10½ feet long to 19 feet, 7 inches, but the NoBo 10.5 conforms to the parameters of this article. There are two configurations. One offers a fold-down back panel that exposes the interior and allows you to use the camper as a toy hauler.

Like Little Guy, the NoBo 10.5 is an authentic off-road trailer with one-piece construction, aluminum frame, heavy duty axles and tires, and metal underskin.

Instead of two mattresses, it comes with square cushions that form a bed, sofa or chairs. This arrangement allows you to sit upright and is more versatile than Little Guy. A spacious storage in the back has restraints to keep items stationary. A flip-up table and cupholder are on the wall.

Under the mattresses is a trap door that accesses a storage area beneath the floor.

The exterior galley is ingenious. It contains a refrigerator/freezer, a two-burner propane stove, and wash pan on a slide that retracts into the body and locks when not in use. It also has a strut to stabilize the slide when extended. A spray hose attaches to a fitting on the side to wash dishes.

Inside the galley compartment is a monitor panel, light switches and a lockbox. The galley door also is lockable.

A 30-amp electric receptacle, solar plug-in and city water receptacle are conveniently located.

A low-profile, 13,500-btu Dometic air conditioner is mounted on top.

A really nice feature is a wraparound awning that tucks into a side-mounted pouch when not in use.

The NoBo 10.5 also comes with a 30-gallon fresh water tank. The hitch weight of the two models is 198 pounds and 210 pounds, respectively.

The standard Discoverer Package comes with an integral JBL FLIP 4 bluetooth speaker with cradle mount, complete interior and exterior lighting, and Xtreme Ply roof material.

The optional Overlander Package includes a Rhino rack system, Vortex bars and a Rhino J-Cradle system for your kayaks, and also a wheel step.

The graphics are distinctive and very attractive.

Flagstaff E-Pro

Squarely between the Little Guy and NoBo is Flagstaff’s contribution to this genre, the E-Pro 12RK Ultralight. At 12 feet, it is a little longer and taller than the NoBo and Little Guy, but it is also considerably less expensive than the other comparable models.

The E-Pro weighs 1,150 pounds empty, and its tongue weight is 153 pounds. Like Little Guy, the interior is for sleeping only and contains a single heated queen mattress. Storage areas fore and aft do not impinge on headroom or legroom.

There is an interior speaker, AM-FM, CD, DVD and bluetooth player, TV hookup, directional TV antenna and a Wi-Fi range booster.

The camper comes with a two-way vent fan, but you can also get an optional 11,000-btu low-profile, roof-mount air conditioner.

Like Little Guy, the E-pro has a large galley in the back that contains a microwave oven, refrigerator and sink. The fridge runs on a 300-watt inverter that comes with the unit. Also in the galley is a monitor panel that shows you the battery status and water storage levels. The fresh water tank holds 20 gallons.

A retractable platform on the side holds a two burner cooktop and prep table that store in the galley when not in use.

Like the NoBo, it has a city water hookup, and also a cable TV hookup.

Its graphics are attractive.

The author’s Little Guy 5-Wide Rough Rider is designed for off-road camping but is also at home in developed campgrounds. With its pintle hitch, enclo…

The author’s Little Guy 5-Wide Rough Rider is designed for off-road camping but is also at home in developed campgrounds. With its pintle hitch, enclo…

Sports on 08/05/2018

Category: Accessories  Tags: ,  Comments off

Fun and funky finds for freshman foodies

Whenever Earl Horlyk posts new content, you’ll get an email delivered to your inbox with a link.

Email notifications are only sent once a day, and only if there are new matching items.

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Anna Wintour’s Favorite Designer Gets Into Limited-Edition Dinnerware

Interior designer Jeffrey Bilhuber, a top colorist and all-American classicist, has won the adoration of Vogue editor-in-chief Anna Wintour, who hired Manhattan-based Bilhuber to design her country house.

“Jeffrey is great at taking one’s own taste and making it better,” Wintour later raved.

Collaboration is Bilhuber’s strong suit. His latest project is a porcelain dinner service created with wallpaper legend de Gournay. Designed by Bilhuber and handmade in Beijing’s historic Imperial Jingdezhen studios, the 35-piece Alchemy collection has been added to de Gournay’s permanent collection of wallpapers, fabrics and porcelains.

The dinnerware flirts on the edge of maximalism, with molten gold and vivid botanical motifs that reference full-bodied tulips in Dutch still-life paintings. Each limited-edition service is numbered; changes and customizations are encouraged.

Six-place serving $45,000 offered through Culp Associates.

Culp Associates Dallas Design Center, 1025 N. Stemmons Freeway, Suite 500.

Category: Dinnerware  Tags: ,  Comments off