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August 7, 2018 |

Archive for » August 7th, 2018«

New HomeGoods Store To Open In Cerritos Town Center

CERRITOS, CA – Home décor store HomeGoods will open a new store in Cerritos on August 26 at 8 a.m., according to a press release The new 24,558 square-foot store will be located in the Cerritos Town Center at 12865 Towne Center Drive. The retail store expects to fill approximately 65 full- and part-time positions, according to HomeGoods.

Regular store hours will be Monday through Thursday from 9:30 a.m. to 9:30; Friday through Saturday from 9:30 a.m. to 10:00 p.m.; and Sunday from 11:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. The special Grand Opening Day hours will be from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m.

“Our amazing values, brand names, and vast assortment make HomeGoods an exciting destination for shoppers,” John Ricciuti, President of HomeGoods, said in the press release. “With a large variety of special merchandise from around the world, customers will always find something thrilling in our treasure hunt environment at great values. We are happy to provide Cerritos with a local HomeGoods.”

HomeGoods sells furniture, rugs, lighting, decorative accessories, kitchen and dining, bedding, bath, kids’ décor and toys, pet accessories, storage, workspace, outdoor, gourmet, wellness and more, the press release said. For additional HomeGoods locations, please visit HomeGoods.com.

Photo courtesy of FTP Edelman/HomeGoods


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Global Dinnerware Market Performance,Market Share, Analysis and forecast to 2022

The Dinnerware Market report provides a basic overview of the industry including definitions, classifications, Dinnerware Industry by applications and industry chain structure. In this introductory section, the Dinnerware Market research report incorporates analysis of definitions, classifications, applications and industry chain structure. Besides this, the report also consists of development trends, competitive landscape analysis, and key regions development status.

Global Dinnerware market competition by top manufacturers/players, with Dinnerware sales volume, Price (USD/Unit), revenue (Million USD), Players/Suppliers Profiles and Sales Data, Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Competitors and market share for each manufacturer/player; the top players including:  Meissen, Hermes, Arabia, GIEN, Herend, Royal Doulton, Wedgwood, Royal Worcester, Corelle, WMF

Request for Sample Report of Dinnerware Market @ https://www.360marketupdates.com/enquiry/request-sample/11033827   

Key Points Covered in The Report:

  • The points that are discussed within the report are the major market players that are involved in the Dinnerware market.
  • The complete profile of the companies is mentioned.
  • The production, sales, future strategies, and the technological developments that they are making are also included within the report.
  • The growth factors of the Dinnerware market is discussed in detail wherein the different end users of the market are explained in detail.
  • The application areas of the Dinnerware Industry are also discussed thus giving a broad idea about the market to the clients.
  • The report contains the SWOT analysis of the market.
  • This Dinnerware market report provides valuable information for companies like manufacturers, suppliers, distributors, traders, customers, investors and individuals who have interests in this industry. Finally, the report contains the conclusion part where the opinions of the industrial experts are included.

Split by Product Types, with sales, revenue, price, market share of each type, can be divided into:  Plates, Bowls, Sets

On the basis on the end users/applications, Dinnerware market report focuses on the status and outlook for major applications/end users, sales volume, market share and growth rate for each application, including:  Home Usage, Commercial Usage

Dinnerware Market Segment by Regions, this report splits Global into several key Regions, with sales, revenue, market share of top players in these regions, from 2012 to 2022 (forecast), like:

  • North America
  • Europe
  • Asia-Pacific (China, Japan, Southeast Asia)

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Major table of content included in Dinnerware market Report:

  • Main market players of Dinnerware, with company and product introduction, position in the Dinnerware market
  • What is the Market status and development trend of Dinnerware by types and applications?
  • Cost and profit status of Dinnerware, and marketing status
  • Market growth drivers and challenges
  • What are the Dinnerware Market Effect Factors?
  • Who are Top Distributors/Traders, Key Suppliers of Raw Materials?
  • How Manufacturing Process Analysis is done for Dinnerware Market?

Finally, Dinnerware Market report is the believable source for gaining the market research that will exponentially accelerate your business. This research report provides analysis and information according to market segments such as geography, technology and applications. Dinnerware Industry report gives the principle local, economic situations with the item value, benefit, limit, generation, supply, request and market development rate and figure and so on. Dinnerware industry report additionally Present new task SWOT examination, speculation attainability, and venture return.

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Lebanon museum honors hometown hero and famed designer Russel Wright

Russel WrightPhoto: ©Yousuf Karsh/Used with the permission of Karsh.orgConsidering how renowned this region is for its ceramics history — the Cincinnati Art Museum has a sizeable collection of Rookwood Pottery — more people should know about a hidden gem of an exhibit at the Harmon Museum Art Gallery in Lebanon, Ohio. It features the timeless work of the world-famous industrial designer Russel Wright, who was born and bred in this small city just 30 miles north of Cincinnati.

The museum, which was established in 1940 by the Warren County Historical Society, has a carefully curated, sizeable permanent collection of Wright’s tableware, barware and furniture. This includes vintage pieces from his colorful American Modern earthenware dinnerware collection, considered the best selling in history.

The exhibit features tableware from both Wright’s American Modern and Iroquois Casual China; his Art Deco-inspired unstained hard rock maple furniture; historical documents and newspaper clippings pertaining to his life; commemorative stamps of Wright’s flatware from the U.S. Postal Service’s 2011 Pioneers of American Industrial Design series; and the quirky choice of a cardboard painting believed to be Wright’s earliest known work. While the exhibit is displayed continually, the selection — largely acquired from donors — is rotated monthly. There are about 80 pieces on display and for every one, there are roughly seven to 10 in storage.

At first blush, a common visual theme for the pieces at the Harmon Museum comes to mind: curvilinear, organic shapes. Tableware with rounded edges and teardrop-like lines adorn the display case — a nature-inspired design indicative to Wright’s work. This design carries on through each piece in the exhibit, from the charming soft-colored dinnerware to exquisite glassware and brushed aluminum. What makes the Harmon collection special, says exhibit curator Michael Coyan, is that the diverse pieces from throughout his career prove its timelessness.

“Kenneth Clark, the great art historian, said that,  ‘Art must use the language of the day,’ ” Coyan says. “We know that languages are never fully ever dead and styles come back. Russel Wright in his lifetime did not live long enough to see his style of beautiful serving pieces come back into great popularity, but 10 to 15 years after his death — boom, there it is.”

Wright certainly built up an extensive résumé. Born in 1904, he studied at the Art Academy of Cincinnati with esteemed Covington painter Frank Duveneck before even receiving his high school diploma. After studying at Princeton University, he moved to New York City and worked in set design under theatrical and industrial designer Norman Bel Geddes. He also garnered inspiration from nature when summering in upstate New York.

American Modern pitchers from Manitoga/Russel Wright Design CenterPHOTO: Masca

After marrying Mary Small Einstein, a designer and sculptor, in 1927, they started a Manhattan studio. American Modern dinnerware was introduced in 1939 and quickly became a must-have for homemakers in the 1940s and the ’50s; the styles started moving quickly from department store shelves and onto dining room tables. Amid the current revival in Modernism, select pieces are still being manufactured, and there’s a healthy market for originals.

Wright was based in New York until his death in 1976. What made him a household name was the unprecedented commercialization of his work. 

“He was probably the first to have personality-based merchandise,” says John Zimkus, the Harmon’s historian and director of education. “He really did make a mark as an industrial designer. Before there was Martha Stewart, Tommy Hilfiger or Ralph Lauren, Russel Wright’s name on things sold.”

Wright’s legacy continues. The Russel Wright Design Center operates Manitoga, his Modernist home and studio in Garrison, N.Y., and it’s a tourist attraction. Zimkus says Wright’s local connection and the museum’s exhibit should be a source of pride in Lebanon, where his childhood home still stands, as well as in Cincinnati.

“Great art doesn’t have to take place or be created somewhere else,” he says. “Influential people are from all over and southwest Ohio — Lebanon and Cincinnati — has made its mark on the world of art. This is simply a reflection of that.”

The Harmon Museum Art Gallery is located at 105 S. Broadway, Lebanon. More information: harmonmuseumohio.org.

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Fiesta Dinnerware Unveils Bride Squad Mug Collection | Gourmet …

Homer Laughlin’s Fiesta Dinnerware has unveiled a new bridal mug collection designed as giftables for the bride and her bride squad.

The Bridal Collection mugs will be available in the following designs: Bride, mother of the bride, mother of the groom, maid of honor and bridesmaid. The Bridal Collection is featured on Fiesta’s tapered mugs, which are white and inscribed with a pink font.

Fiesta has also made some changes to its Mr. and Mrs. mugs. The company has transitioned from the Java Mug style to the Tapered Bistro Mug. Blue text is featured on a white ceramic background.

“Fiesta and weddings go hand in hand,” said Rich Brinkman, vp/sales and marketing at Homer Laughlin. “Fiesta regularly tops bridal registries in the casual dinnerware category. This Bridal Collection is a beautiful way for a bride to thank her wedding party.”

The mugs carry a manufacturer suggested retail price of $32. The Bridal Collection and Mr. and Mrs. Mugs will be available at better department stores, independent retailers and online this month.

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Austin-based Made In sells Instagram-friendly pots, pans online

Not every cook loves to spend hours in Bed Bath Beyond picking out pots and pans.

An Austin-based company is taking a millennial-minded, direct-to-consumer approach to selling the tools you need to make dinner.

By selling online only, Made In founders Jake Kalick and Chip Malt knew that they could appeal to a generation of customers who were already buying eyeglasses, razors and underwear through the internet.

But why pots and pans?

The easy answer is that Kalick grew up in the cookware industry. His grandparents started Harbour, a Boston-based commercial foodservice company, in the 1920s. He and Malt have known each other since they were 5 years old and growing up in Boston; they stayed in touch as they started their careers.

Kalick worked in food, first in restaurants and then for his family’s business. Malt was working for a direct-to-consumer apparel company and had millennials’ buying habits on his mind.



“Have you ever thought about kitchen tools?” he asked Kalick one day a few years ago.

That was the start of what became Made In. Over two years, the friends-turned-business-partners dug into the supply chain to find U.S. manufacturers to produce the sauce and saute pans they wanted to sell. Kalick knew the markups that were built into the price of familiar brands, such as All-Clad, so he knew they could increase the quality — and keep manufacturing in the U.S. — by selling to customers directly. Pots and pans might be heavy, but they are relatively easy to ship.

But before they started designing the product line, the company surveyed 100 cooks about what they knew and didn’t know about pots and pans. “Nobody had brand affinity, and everyone was waiting until they were married” to buy them, Kalick says. Customers didn’t want the handles to get hot and didn’t like the current handles on the market, so Made In engineered slightly slimmer handles that wouldn’t heat easily.

The founders say it was an easy decision to base their company in Austin. They looked at Los Angeles and Miami, but Kalick says the thriving start-up and food communities in Austin — “the Brooklyn of America,” he says — made it just the right fit. They moved here in early 2017, and, by September, they were shipping pots and pans across the country.

Having spent so much time in the cookware industry, Kalick puts an emphasis on transparency around what the pans are made of and where the materials come from. “Transparency is a big thing for direct to consumer in general, which is why we explain why we source 430stainless steel from Kentucky or 304 (stainless steel) from Pennsylvania that has nickel that helps resist corrosion,” he says.

Kalick might have the background in cookware, but Malt says he considers himself the target demographic: He cooks three times a week and doesn’t shy away from calling himself a “foodie.” He eats at restaurants but also entertains at home.

But selling cookware to millennials is quite different than selling clothing. “In the apparel world, our primary problem was to have people trade away from brands they already love. In this space, it’s a completely different challenge. You go to a 23-year-old and say ‘All-Clad,’ they give you a blank stare.”

Millennials might not be buying homes as fast as generations before them, but they are investing in the stuff in their homes, Malt says, and they are always looking for an excuse to get together. When the founders both lived in New York City after college, they hosted monthly dinner parties for their friends. Food was how they kept their friendship going as they both worked for other companies.

“One of our big missions is bringing back the dinner party,” Kalick says. “We want to encourage people to host get-togethers. Some of the most fun nights are going to a dinner party to eat and drink with someone who does it right.”

That’s when the pots and pans come in. Although experienced cooks like Malt and Kalick can differentiate between high-end and low-end cookware, many beginning cooks can’t. But having good gear “helps you look like you know what you’re doing,” Kalick says.

Younger cooks aren’t the only shoppers who need new pots and pans, of course. Even if the prices might seem high to first-time buyers ($79 for a 10-inch nonstick frying pan, $155 for an 8-quart stock pot), baby boomers who already have some high-end gear in their kitchen see value in Made In’s induction-capable product line, Malt says.

Within the general categories of stock pot, saute pans, saucier, sauce pan and frying pan, the company sells about 30 different products in various colors, sizes and finishes, and most sales come from kits that bundle several pans together.

One question they often get is about the safety of nonstick pans. Malt says the fear of nonstick coating is outdated. Decades ago, American consumers heard a lot about Teflon as a possible carcinogen, but the specific chemical that was of concern — PFOA — is no longer used in Teflon, he says.

However, the concern over Teflon helped the industry find better ways to create a nonstick surface that doesn’t chip or scratch as easily. Made In works with a company in Pennsylvania, which applies three coats of an FDA-approved PTFE, which creates a durable nonstick surface that won’t easily scratch or chip.

Because Malt and Kalick are making Instagram-worthy cooking gear for an Instagram-loving generation, the pans come in several colors on the outside, and on the nonstick pans, you can choose between blue and graphite. They’ll eventually sell chef’s knives and other kitchen gear, but for now, look out for a specialty cookware line this fall featuring designs from Austin-based illustrator Will Bryant.

All Made In pots and pans come with a recipe on the bottom. It might seem like an odd place to put a recipe that you would need to reference while you’re cooking, but Malt says it becomes a talking point for cooks.

“I can’t remember when I looked at the bottom of the pan and had any feeling at all,” Malt says. “It sparks conversation. We just wanted to do something different. We didn’t start this business to do things the way people have always done it.”



Category: Cookware Pots  Tags: ,  Comments off

Austin-based Made In sells Instagram-friendly pots, pans online

Not every cook loves to spend hours in Bed Bath Beyond picking out pots and pans.

An Austin-based company is taking a millennial-minded, direct-to-consumer approach to selling the tools you need to make dinner.

By selling online only, Made In founders Jake Kalick and Chip Malt knew that they could appeal to a generation of customers who were already buying eyeglasses, razors and underwear through the internet.

But why pots and pans?

The easy answer is that Kalick grew up in the cookware industry. His grandparents started Harbour, a Boston-based commercial foodservice company, in the 1920s. He and Malt have known each other since they were 5 years old and growing up in Boston; they stayed in touch as they started their careers.

Kalick worked in food, first in restaurants and then for his family’s business. Malt was working for a direct-to-consumer apparel company and had millennials’ buying habits on his mind.



“Have you ever thought about kitchen tools?” he asked Kalick one day a few years ago.

That was the start of what became Made In. Over two years, the friends-turned-business-partners dug into the supply chain to find U.S. manufacturers to produce the sauce and saute pans they wanted to sell. Kalick knew the markups that were built into the price of familiar brands, such as All-Clad, so he knew they could increase the quality — and keep manufacturing in the U.S. — by selling to customers directly. Pots and pans might be heavy, but they are relatively easy to ship.

But before they started designing the product line, the company surveyed 100 cooks about what they knew and didn’t know about pots and pans. “Nobody had brand affinity, and everyone was waiting until they were married” to buy them, Kalick says. Customers didn’t want the handles to get hot and didn’t like the current handles on the market, so Made In engineered slightly slimmer handles that wouldn’t heat easily.

The founders say it was an easy decision to base their company in Austin. They looked at Los Angeles and Miami, but Kalick says the thriving start-up and food communities in Austin — “the Brooklyn of America,” he says — made it just the right fit. They moved here in early 2017, and, by September, they were shipping pots and pans across the country.

Having spent so much time in the cookware industry, Kalick puts an emphasis on transparency around what the pans are made of and where the materials come from. “Transparency is a big thing for direct to consumer in general, which is why we explain why we source 430stainless steel from Kentucky or 304 (stainless steel) from Pennsylvania that has nickel that helps resist corrosion,” he says.

Kalick might have the background in cookware, but Malt says he considers himself the target demographic: He cooks three times a week and doesn’t shy away from calling himself a “foodie.” He eats at restaurants but also entertains at home.

But selling cookware to millennials is quite different than selling clothing. “In the apparel world, our primary problem was to have people trade away from brands they already love. In this space, it’s a completely different challenge. You go to a 23-year-old and say ‘All-Clad,’ they give you a blank stare.”

Millennials might not be buying homes as fast as generations before them, but they are investing in the stuff in their homes, Malt says, and they are always looking for an excuse to get together. When the founders both lived in New York City after college, they hosted monthly dinner parties for their friends. Food was how they kept their friendship going as they both worked for other companies.

“One of our big missions is bringing back the dinner party,” Kalick says. “We want to encourage people to host get-togethers. Some of the most fun nights are going to a dinner party to eat and drink with someone who does it right.”

That’s when the pots and pans come in. Although experienced cooks like Malt and Kalick can differentiate between high-end and low-end cookware, many beginning cooks can’t. But having good gear “helps you look like you know what you’re doing,” Kalick says.

Younger cooks aren’t the only shoppers who need new pots and pans, of course. Even if the prices might seem high to first-time buyers ($79 for a 10-inch nonstick frying pan, $155 for an 8-quart stock pot), baby boomers who already have some high-end gear in their kitchen see value in Made In’s induction-capable product line, Malt says.

Within the general categories of stock pot, saute pans, saucier, sauce pan and frying pan, the company sells about 30 different products in various colors, sizes and finishes, and most sales come from kits that bundle several pans together.

One question they often get is about the safety of nonstick pans. Malt says the fear of nonstick coating is outdated. Decades ago, American consumers heard a lot about Teflon as a possible carcinogen, but the specific chemical that was of concern — PFOA — is no longer used in Teflon, he says.

However, the concern over Teflon helped the industry find better ways to create a nonstick surface that doesn’t chip or scratch as easily. Made In works with a company in Pennsylvania, which applies three coats of an FDA-approved PTFE, which creates a durable nonstick surface that won’t easily scratch or chip.

Because Malt and Kalick are making Instagram-worthy cooking gear for an Instagram-loving generation, the pans come in several colors on the outside, and on the nonstick pans, you can choose between blue and graphite. They’ll eventually sell chef’s knives and other kitchen gear, but for now, look out for a specialty cookware line this fall featuring designs from Austin-based illustrator Will Bryant.

All Made In pots and pans come with a recipe on the bottom. It might seem like an odd place to put a recipe that you would need to reference while you’re cooking, but Malt says it becomes a talking point for cooks.

“I can’t remember when I looked at the bottom of the pan and had any feeling at all,” Malt says. “It sparks conversation. We just wanted to do something different. We didn’t start this business to do things the way people have always done it.”



Category: Cookware Pots  Tags: ,  Comments off