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August 18, 2018 |

Archive for » August 18th, 2018«

Walmart Has 16-Piece Dinnerware Sets Starting At Just $14.99 …

If you’re in the market for new dishes, Walmart currently has dinnerware sets on clearance at steep discounts online. Whether you’re a student headed to your first off-campus apartment, a newlywed seeking dinnerware for your new life or if you simply need a kitchen refresh, now is the time to snag new dishes at a great price.

Check out three of the complete dinnerware options on sale below. Some are eligible for free in-store pickup, and many also qualify for free two-day shipping when you spend a minimum of $35.

Mainstays 16-Piece Festive Fall Pumpkins Dinnerware Set, $17.99

How cute is this pumpkin-themed dinnerware set on sale for just $17.99 (marked down from $49.99)? This seasonal set would be perfect for all your autumnal get-togethers.

Walmart

Cruise Multi-Striped Collection 16-Piece Porcelain Dinnerware Set, $14.99

If versatile basics are more what you seek in your dinnerware, look no further than this porcelain set for $14.99 (originally priced at $39.99) that comes in beige, pink or blue stripes.

Walmart

Watercolor 16-Piece Dinnerware Set, $19.99

Marked down from $34.99, this pretty watercolor set is now priced at just $19.99 and will add an interesting pop of color to your dinner table.

Walmart

Baum Metro 3-Tone 16-piece Stoneware Dinnerware Set

If you are looking for neutral-toned dinnerware fit for any occasion, then this 16-piece set is just the right price at $19.99 (originally $49.15).

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You can get All-Clad cookware at amazing prices right now

— Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. However, our picks and opinions are independent from USA TODAY’s newsroom and any business incentives.

Editor’s note: All-Clad has extended the VIP Factory Seconds Sale. You now have until Thursday, August 16 at 11:59 p.m. EST to shop.

If you’re an amateur home cook or just a kitchen enthusiast, you want to fill your kitchen with the best cookware money can buy. But you can’t always spend that kind of money you might want to do so. Thankfully, every so often All-Clad holds a crazy sale, so us novice chefs can get some of the best kitchen products without breaking the bank.

Right now, you can save up to 80% on this high-end cookware brand as part of their Factory Seconds VIP Summer Clearance Event. Plus, you can save an extra 10% if you spend $150 or more (which honestly isn’t that hard to do). You just need to use the code “ACSUMMER18” to access these amazing deals. This sale runs until 12:00 a.m. EST on Wednesday, August 15, so if you’ve ever wanted All-Clad cookware, now may be the time to buy.

The All-Clad brand is known for long-lasting, high-quality kitchen products with a sleek stainless steel finish that looks amazing in any kitchen, and these discounts on popular items are incredible. For example, you can get an 8-inch and 10-inch nonstick fry pan set for just $40 (that’s $50 in savings!). There are also plenty of other pots, pans, griddles, knives, bakeware, kitchen accessories, and more with similar discounts.

The one catch of this sale, though, is that all of these products are factory seconds—but there’s actually no need for concern. All this means is that these products couldn’t be sold at full price due to minor imperfections like surface scratches and dents, which typically happens anyways after some normal usage and should not affect the integrity of the cookware.

If you want flawless cookware, this might not be the sale for you. But for those of us who can look past the surface, you can score some amazing deals on new high-end items to upgrade your kitchen.

Use the code “ACSUMMER18” to access the All-Clad VIP Factory Seconds Sale

Prices are accurate at the time of publication, but may change over time.

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Fast-expanding Express Kitchens Open New Store in Springfield, Massachusetts

SPRINGFIELD, Mass., Aug. 17, 2018 /PRNewswire-PRWeb/ — Connecticut’s leading kitchen cabinet manufacturer, Express Kitchens brings custom cabinets to the Massachusetts market, which is primarily driven by the willingness of the customers to invest in exclusive designs for dream kitchens.

Express Kitchens offer its flagship Star Cabinetry line of solutions that have already captured the fancy of buyers across Connecticut and Massachusetts. In addition, the company deals with other nationally-acclaimed brands of kitchen cabinets and is endorsed as the one-stop designation for hundreds of kitchen cabinet options. A family owned and operated business, Express Kitchens supplies the entire Northeast market. Producing and assembling their own cabinet line, including laminate and granite countertops, allows Express Kitchens to directly pass along the savings to their customers. Monthly storewide promotions are offered.

The company is actively involved in designing and installing tailor-made kitchen solutions for over a decade and is among the fastest growing names in the region’s cabinetry industry. The state of Massachusetts has been a happy destination for Express Kitchens with retail customers endorsing the supreme quality of customer services – Bill Carmen Blatch from Springfield, MA share their Express Kitchens experience. Watch https://youtu.be/KdP1y18MFXc.

CEO of Express Kitchens, Max Kothari, said, “Homeowners have distinct tastes, preferences, and needs when it comes to kitchen cabinets and countertops. Based on what’s popular across the world, we offer some very diverse range of alluring cabinet finishes like Oak, Cherry, Maple, Birch, Hickory, Thermofoil, Plantation Wood, and Laminate. This enables our customers to choose styles matching their tastes and create a wonderful overall appeal. We have been able to cater to different budgets over all these years. Moreover, we unveil exciting promotional offers from time to time to make prices affordable for one and all. Our secret to success is very simple: We are best aligned with customers’ needs when they are looking to remodel kitchens.”

In 2014, Express was the winner of Forbes Magazine Inner City 100 with a growth rate of 172% over 5 years. To date, Express Kitchens has installed over 22 thousand kitchens in Connecticut and Western Massachusetts. The company’s focus on customer service has established itself as an industry leader.

Express Kitchens has locations in Bridgeport, Brookfield, Hamden, Hartford (2), Newington, New London, Norwalk, Orange, Stamford, Torrington, Southington, Waterbury, Connecticut and West Springfield, Massachusetts. For more information, stop into a store, call them at (860) 247-1000, email us at Marketing@expresskitchen.net or visit http://www.expresskitchen.net.

 

SOURCE Express Kitchens

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Past In Review

100 Years Ago (1918)

Members of the Class of 1918 at Alliance High School received a letter from Andre Delbary, a French boy that the class adopted as a sort of godson after his father was killed in action. The boy noted in his letter that his mother had written to Fremont Bradshaw, a member of the class that was in France, asking him to visit their home during his furlough.

William McKinley Perry, a former employee of the Morgan Engineering Co., became the 41st “East End Boy” to enlist in the military. He was assigned to the USS Meade, a shipmate of his bother-in-law and fellow Alliance resident Earl H. Ganslein.

75 Years Ago (75 Years Ago)

John H. Taylor, who lived in Alliance for nearly eight years when he worked for the American Book Company, had been  promoted to major in the U.S. Army and was the commanding officer of Camp Bell in Buffalo, New York, the Army Air Force’s Eastern Technical Training Command.

Cpl. John Dolan, a member of the Royal Air Force and native of Scotland, was visiting the area while on furlough and met his cousin, Mrs. Emmet Weizenecker, of Beloit, among other family members, for the first time. Dolan, who had spent four years serving in Europe, was stationed in the Bahamas at the time of his visit and said he planned to bring his wife and three children to the United States to live after the war.

Alliance native Noyes McVay, a first lieutenant, was set to return to duty after a furlough. He was to rejoin his bomber “Lady Halitosis,” on which he was the co-pilot for 43 missions during which his crew had attacked three submarines, shot down five enemy planes and dropped 34 tons of bombs on enemy objectives. He and his fellow 22 crew members were to tour war plants and air bases, telling of their operations in North Africa and Sicily.

The capital stock of the Limoges China Company in Sebring, which had been in possession of the late F.A. Sebring and members of his family, was sold to National Unit Distributors Inc. of Boston and New York, the largest distributor of dinnerware in the United States and a customer of Limoges China for many years. Limoges, which was organized in 1904, was one of the last to be built in Sebring and was a pioneer in the installation of tunnel kilns. it was reported to be the only Sebring plant to weather the depression period.

Robert R. Pierce, son of Mr. and Mrs. Floyd Pierce, residents of the 400 block of South Street, was the second son to be made a captain within six months. A Mount Union grad, he had completed his medical studies at Vanderbilt Medical School in Nashville. His brother, Don Pierce, had been made a captain and was an aviation instructor. A third brother, John, had just been inducted into the service.

Lloyd Smith, 23, a 1935 graduate of Alliance High, received his second commission in a year, advancing to the rank of first lieutenant. He was based in California in the quartermaster corps.

Clarice Siddall, a former golf champion at Alliance Country Club, had joined the Women’s Auxiliary Ferrying Services.

50 Years Ago (1968)

Mrs. Beverly L. Matz, 25, of Homeworth, sustained fatal injuries in a car crash in Pennsylvania. She had worked with her father, George Sanor, at his company, the Ohio Drill and Tool Co.

25 Years Ago (1993)

Marlington student Natalie Call, 13, won the Ohio Junior Division Showmanship Championship at the Ohio State Fair with her 9-year-old quarter horse Kate Redford.

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The Jewelry Industry’s Design Dilemma

If consumers can’t see meaningful differences, what else is there to look at but price?Deposit Photos

Walk into many jewelry manufacturing plants around the world – perhaps even most – and you’ll see lowest-common-denominator design processes taking place.

You’ll encounter it in conference rooms, where retail buyers are reviewing the designs they saw at the jewelry show in Las Vegas, or Hong Kong, or Basel; asking if the manufacturing team can knock off their favorite looks from the exhibitions.

You’ll see it in offices, where a designer’s work is being picked apart by sales staff, who are suggesting that a few more diamonds on the halo, or down the shoulder, or a blackened metal, or a more pointy-tipped prong, are necessary; that these are the elements that seem to be selling in the market.

Then, the top sales guy takes the designs back to his desk and returns a day later with images pulled off a Google search, cut and taped together to demonstrate what he thinks they should be selling.

Here’s a simple rule about market value to consider: If all the products in the market are essentially the same, then the only thing any customer will care about is price. Once customers only care about price, the market starts bleeding value. What is left after this occurs? Simply the sum of the parts; in this case, the market value of the gemstones and precious metals. After that, returning the market to a state of added value is extremely painful, if not impossible.

What Happens When Innovation Disappears?

This isn’t even new news. The jewelry industry has been marching down this path for some time.

The results are showing in an independent retail segment that is struggling to compete with online sellers and non-traditional jewelry sellers. It is tempting to write off the struggles at jewelry retail as being the same as the struggles at all retail – and to a certain extent, they are – but to do so ignores a corollary problem. Walk into any jewelry store anywhere, and you are likely to see the same cases filled with solitaires, solitaires with halos, solitaires with double halos, diamond studs, and three-stone rings. Yes, there will always be demand for jewelry basics, but have we become too . . . well . . . basic? Consumers have been trained to expect that they will not see anything new or different at the jewelry store, so they do comparison research online and negotiate prices.

The jewelry industry has a jewelry manufacturing sector that does not innovate. Yes, there are pockets of innovation – you’ll see them profiled in this column in the coming weeks and months. But the dominant focus of the jewelry manufacturing sector has been to perfect the pumping-out of parts, the mechanization of what was hand work for nearly a millennium, and the reduction reduction reduction of labor costs. Which, when you consider it, should really make you scratch your head. When the item you are making consists of $700 worth of gold, $2,800 worth of gemstones, and $80 worth of labor (and this is before the U.S. started exporting jewelry jobs), how much can a company gain by focusing so much energy on lowering labor costs?

What are the Opportunities for Value Add?

Please don’t misunderstand. No manufacturer should spend more money on labor than necessary relative to their brand strategy, and working to improve efficiencies and reduce errors is extremely important work.

But is it possible that the jewelry industry threw all its eggs into the efficiency basket? Is it possible that it turned 100% of its attention to reducing production costs and increasing output, and in the process failed to attend to that other extremely important aspect of value add: Design?

At some level, the industry knows it’s lost something important. Retailers and manufacturers have attempted to focus attention on customer service as a differentiator. The problem with that is great customer service is now a minimum standard necessary to compete. Once something is expected, it no longer provides value add.

Thousands of companies around the world manufacture jewelry, both for their own distribution efforts and for other brands.  Yet a mere handful of jewelry brands ever achieve consumer recognition. Meanwhile, survey after survey reports that good design is a priority for Millennials – from clothing to electronics to kitchen accessories, design matters. Considering that this is the fastest-growing jewelry-buying demographic, the industry must take note.

So What About Design?

Design is a discipline, just like engineering, marketing, or accounting. Yes, starlets and trust-fund babies with cash to burn can decide to become jewelry designers, but just because one says it’s so doesn’t mean it is. There is a reason that Tiffany Company jewelry is so appealing. Beyond the marketing and manufacturing machine, at the heart of the brand, are designers; people who study and practice the art of creating something functional, beautiful and balanced, something that pleases the eye and stimulates the senses like a perfect dish pleases the palette. Harry Winston didn’t become famous because he could get his hands on exquisite diamonds (though that didn’t hurt). It was his uncanny sense of how to design the setting around each diamond that set him apart. David Yurman has become a powerhouse partly because they created jewelry for the mass market without ever losing sight of the importance of design. Both David Yurman and his co-founder wife Sybil are practicing artists, and that sensibility is always in the forefront of the company they created.

Bree Richey’s Circle Flower Earring is an example of exceptional design. Breejewelry.comBreeJewelry.Com

Does the jewelry industry have a design problem? The jewelry industry needs to focus more on creating great design – agree or not?

None of this is to say there isn’t brilliant jewelry design for sale. The jewelry industry is filled with independent designers producing small lines, and that body of work is exceptional. The problem is that these designers rarely have the capital to make it to market. It’s next to impossible for them to penetrate jewelry retail, and going direct-to-consumer is prohibitively expensive (it’s easy to build a Shopify site, but there’s no guarantee that anyone will ever visit it). Most independent designers survive by selling to between 10-30 stores – hardly enough exposure to create a lasting consumer impression. If the manufacturers were smart, they would tap into this talent pool.

Creating a bias toward design is not an easy thing to do in organizations that have not thought this way before. It requires hiring experienced design talent and investing in the development of design teams. It means taking risks to create new looks, and not simply pandering to the most mainstream tastes. It means doing the hard work of defining collections and learning the art of merchandising. It means developing an understanding of the difference between good design and great design, or learning to trust someone to guide that part of the product development process.

Sustained, explicit focus on design would surely help create more differentiation in a sea of sameness. And that’s the kind of value add that consumers are willing to pay for.

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Walmart Has 16-Piece Dinnerware Sets Starting At Just $14.99

If you’re in the market for new dishes, Walmart currently has dinnerware sets on clearance at steep discounts online. Whether you’re a student headed to your first off-campus apartment, a newlywed seeking dinnerware for your new life or if you simply need a kitchen refresh, now is the time to snag new dishes at a great price.

Check out three of the complete dinnerware options on sale below. Some are eligible for free in-store pickup, and many also qualify for free two-day shipping when you spend a minimum of $35.

Mainstays 16-Piece Festive Fall Pumpkins Dinnerware Set, $17.99

How cute is this pumpkin-themed dinnerware set on sale for just $17.99 (marked down from $49.99)? This seasonal set would be perfect for all your autumnal get-togethers.

Walmart

Cruise Multi-Striped Collection 16-Piece Porcelain Dinnerware Set, $14.99

If versatile basics are more what you seek in your dinnerware, look no further than this porcelain set for $14.99 (originally priced at $39.99) that comes in beige, pink or blue stripes.

Walmart

Watercolor 16-Piece Dinnerware Set, $19.99

Marked down from $34.99, this pretty watercolor set is now priced at just $19.99 and will add an interesting pop of color to your dinner table.

Walmart
Category: Dinnerware  Tags: ,  Comments off

Past In Review

100 Years Ago (1918)

Members of the Class of 1918 at Alliance High School received a letter from Andre Delbary, a French boy that the class adopted as a sort of godson after his father was killed in action. The boy noted in his letter that his mother had written to Fremont Bradshaw, a member of the class that was in France, asking him to visit their home during his furlough.

William McKinley Perry, a former employee of the Morgan Engineering Co., became the 41st “East End Boy” to enlist in the military. He was assigned to the USS Meade, a shipmate of his bother-in-law and fellow Alliance resident Earl H. Ganslein.

75 Years Ago (75 Years Ago)

John H. Taylor, who lived in Alliance for nearly eight years when he worked for the American Book Company, had been  promoted to major in the U.S. Army and was the commanding officer of Camp Bell in Buffalo, New York, the Army Air Force’s Eastern Technical Training Command.

Cpl. John Dolan, a member of the Royal Air Force and native of Scotland, was visiting the area while on furlough and met his cousin, Mrs. Emmet Weizenecker, of Beloit, among other family members, for the first time. Dolan, who had spent four years serving in Europe, was stationed in the Bahamas at the time of his visit and said he planned to bring his wife and three children to the United States to live after the war.

Alliance native Noyes McVay, a first lieutenant, was set to return to duty after a furlough. He was to rejoin his bomber “Lady Halitosis,” on which he was the co-pilot for 43 missions during which his crew had attacked three submarines, shot down five enemy planes and dropped 34 tons of bombs on enemy objectives. He and his fellow 22 crew members were to tour war plants and air bases, telling of their operations in North Africa and Sicily.

The capital stock of the Limoges China Company in Sebring, which had been in possession of the late F.A. Sebring and members of his family, was sold to National Unit Distributors Inc. of Boston and New York, the largest distributor of dinnerware in the United States and a customer of Limoges China for many years. Limoges, which was organized in 1904, was one of the last to be built in Sebring and was a pioneer in the installation of tunnel kilns. it was reported to be the only Sebring plant to weather the depression period.

Robert R. Pierce, son of Mr. and Mrs. Floyd Pierce, residents of the 400 block of South Street, was the second son to be made a captain within six months. A Mount Union grad, he had completed his medical studies at Vanderbilt Medical School in Nashville. His brother, Don Pierce, had been made a captain and was an aviation instructor. A third brother, John, had just been inducted into the service.

Lloyd Smith, 23, a 1935 graduate of Alliance High, received his second commission in a year, advancing to the rank of first lieutenant. He was based in California in the quartermaster corps.

Clarice Siddall, a former golf champion at Alliance Country Club, had joined the Women’s Auxiliary Ferrying Services.

50 Years Ago (1968)

Mrs. Beverly L. Matz, 25, of Homeworth, sustained fatal injuries in a car crash in Pennsylvania. She had worked with her father, George Sanor, at his company, the Ohio Drill and Tool Co.

25 Years Ago (1993)

Marlington student Natalie Call, 13, won the Ohio Junior Division Showmanship Championship at the Ohio State Fair with her 9-year-old quarter horse Kate Redford.

Category: Dinnerware  Tags: ,  Comments off