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October, 2018 |

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The 5 Tom Dixon Designs Your Home Needs

Tom Dixon. It’s a name that you’ve heard many times before. It’s a name that you’ve marvelled at many times before. And, it’s a name that you’ve associated with some of the finest pieces of contemporary design for so long. Which is why, this month we’re incredibly proud to introduce the design studio that, well, needs little to no introduction.

The Tom Dixon lighting and furniture collection that you see at OPUMO brings together some of our favourite Dixon designs and it incorporates a number of extraordinary objects that make usually laborious tasks, such as turning on a light or investing in a new side table, more charming and enchanting than ever before. To illustrate our point, and to put you right in the deep end of the studio’s new releases, we’ve picked out five Tom Dixon designs that no home should be without.


Tall Bash Vessel

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Wide Bash Vessel

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Bash Tray

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This year, Tom Dixon design studio has incorporated a fresher colour palette thanks to a glossier approach to design with sharp, precise stainless steel and pop art of colours from electric blue to orange. So, naturally, we wanted to kick off this essential edit of Tom Dixon home accessories by going completely against that. As we’re beginning with something that Tom Dixon is best-known for; wonderful home accessories that somehow tread the line between understated and eccentric.

The Bash collection was born from the desire for more organic, spontaneous and unpredictable design in a world swamped with mass produced, consistently well-finished objects. Essentially, it’s a unique array of homeware items that you know every other house in the street won’t have. Smacked, beaten and hammered into abstract shapes for special bowls, vases and plates, each Bash accessory bears the imprint of the tools and the personality of the craftsmen. Which means they are ideal for use as a flower vase, fruit bowl or as a contemporary sculpture; basically, anything you want.


Copper Melt Pendant Light

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Chrome Melt Pendant Light

(Free Shipping)

Gold Melt Pendant Light

(Free Shipping)

For a long time, home lighting has been a category of interior design that has moved a lot faster than the rest – pendants, standing lamps, sculptural fittings, it’s always a movement that is ahead of many of the interior design curves. Tom Dixon’s lighting isn’t so much ahead of the curve but instead its drawing out a new curve entirely. Just take a look at the Tom Dixon Melt collection and you’ll understand exactly what we mean.

Building on Tom Dixon Design’s obsession with the idea of creating an imperfect, organic and naturalistic light, Melt was created in collaboration with FRONT – a Swedish design collective – and it is a half-metalised distorted spherical light that will cast an ethereal luminosity on its surroundings.

In layman terms, it’s a distorted lighting bulb that creates a mesmerising hot blown glass effect in your interior. Translucent when on and mirror-finished when off, the Tom Dixon bulb emits a mildly hypnotising light that operates on another level to any other sculptural home light that you may have your eye on. For that reason, it’s become one of the most popular Tom Dixon home designs, and one that it doesn’t matter how many times you experience it, it just gets better.

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Chemicals on toys and accessories, clear dangers for children and women in Albania

European Study Shows Toxic E-Waste Chemicals Contaminate Children’s Products Through Recycling /  Banned Brominated Flame retardants Found Also in Toys and Hair Accessories from France

Environmental health researchers released alarming evidence today that toxic brominated flame retardants, hazardous chemicals from electronic waste that are known to disrupt thyroid function and cause neurological and attention deficits in children, are contaminating recycled plastics in consumer products across Europe.

The study, an analysis of 109 toys, hair accessories and kitchen utensils showed that 107 items (98%) contained measurable concentrations of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and 80 samples (73%) contained hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD).

Laboratory analysis of 4 hair accessories samples from Albania found 3 samples contained OctaBDE at concentrations ranging from 2 to 57 ppm and DecaBDE at concentrations ranging from 34 to 1048 ppm. Overall, the results indicate that toxic flame retardant chemicals found in e-waste are present on Albanian market in consumer products made of recycled plastic. This includes substances listed in the Stockholm Convention for global elimination (OctaBDE and DecaBDE).

At the end of life of those products, the provisional POPs waste limit would be applied. The waste limit is currently defined by the Stockholm Convention as either 50 ppm or 1000 ppm. If the limit was applied at the protective level of 50 ppm, one product would fall into the POPs waste class because of the Octa-BDE concentration of 57 ppm.

“Toxic plastics containing brominated flame retardants in levels over 50 ppm should be considered hazardous waste,”said Arnika – Toxics and Waste Programme Executive Director and IPEN Dioxin, PCBs and Waste Working Group co-chair Jindrich Petrlik. “Only a strict hazardous waste limit can close the toxic loophole as it would require toxic plastics to be removed from the waste recycling stream.”

Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and (HBCDs) are toxic flame retardants that are among the 28 most hazardous chemicals on the planet because of their persistency in the environment. PBDEs were found in the casings and wire insulation of old electronics and HBCD appeared in polystyrene foams and plastics for electronics and cars.

Said Jitka Strakova, Arnika’s researcher specialised in POPs and lead author of the study: “A child’s endocrine system does not care if a toy is made from new or recycled plastic when it is being disrupted from toxic PBDE. The only way to protect people from hazardous chemicals in recycled e-waste is to close this recycling loophole and keep hazardous waste out of recycled plastic.”

Stressing that recycling exemptions for PBDEs amounts to a double standard for plastics, the researchers, public health advocates and NGOs, including EDEN Center called on the ALBANIA TO PLAY ITS PART IN ENSURING THAT THE European Union (EU) requires that recycled plastics meet the same standard as new plastics.

The “Toxic Loophole: Recycling Hazardous Waste into New Products” study was conducted by Arnika, HEAL and IPEN.  430 samples were collected in the following countries: European Union Member States (Austria, Belgium, Czechia, Denmark, France, Germany, Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Spain, and Sweden) and surrounding Central and Eastern European countries (Albania, Armenia, Belarus, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Macedonia, Montenegro, Russia, and Serbia) between April and July 2018.  109 products were then further analyzed for concentrations of specific brominated flame retardant chemicals by the laboratory of the Prague University of Chemistry and Technology.

Here you can find the report

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Global Stand Mixer Market 2018 – KitchenAid, Kenwood Limited, Electrolux, Hobart, Breville, Bosch, Philips, Sunbeam …

Innovate Insights Market Research recently published Global Stand Mixer Market Research study which offers insights of in-depth research on historic and current market size along with the expected future prospects of the market and emerging trends in the market. Global Stand Mixer Market 2018 research report further delivers the methodical outlook of the industry by considering features such as Stand Mixer market growth, consumption volume, market trends and Stand Mixer industry cost structure during the forecast period 2018-2025.

Get Free Sample Copy of Report Here: https://www.innovateinsights.com/report/global-stand-mixer-market-by-manufacturers-countries-type/6678/#requestsample

Features of Stand Mixer Market Research Report:

Top manufacturers operating in the Stand Mixer market

KitchenAid
Kenwood Limited
Electrolux
Hobart
Breville
Bosch
Philips
Sunbeam Products, Inc
Panasonic
Hamilton Beach
Cuisinart
Sencor
Sparmixers
SMEG

Market Segment by Type, covers

3.0-5.0 Quarts
5.1-8.0 Quarts
8.0 Quarts

Market Segment by Applications, can be divided into

Household
Commercial

The introductory section of the report offers global Stand Mixer market overview including objectives of Stand Mixer research, definition and specifications. Further, this is followed by broad section on Stand Mixer market scope and size evaluation with respect to regional production analysis and the expected CAGR for the period 2018 to 2025. This detailed study develops Stand Mixer market concentration ratio and strategies of Stand Mixer business. Further report covers a diverse range of elements such as Stand Mixer trend analysis, investment return and feasibility analysis, new project SWOT analysis which helps to analyze the competitive player’s growth in the Stand Mixer industry.

Inquire Before Buying @ https://www.innovateinsights.com/report/global-stand-mixer-market-by-manufacturers-countries-type/6678/#buyinginquiry

Global Stand Mixer market is segmented based on product type, applications along with geographical fragmentation including the regions India, Japan, South East Asia, Europe, China and USA. This section offers major aspects including region-wise production capacity, price, demand, supply chain/logistics, profit/loss, material parameters/specifications, consumption, export/import details, growth rate from 2013 to 2018, and market structure.

This following section highlights a comprehensive company profiling of top manufacturers operating in the market. This section provides information about leading players with their useful business strategies in the market. The company analysis offers company description, product picture and specification, financial overview (such as annual revenue, Stand Mixer production and sales value) and the recent key developments. This section is measured as the fundamental part of the Stand Mixer market report which emphasis on current market trends and intended development associated with dominating market players.

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Care and feeding of your cast iron frying pan (plus perfect recipes …

FOUND: Elana Keyes, of Guilford, wrote, “How do you season a cast-iron frying pan? I’ve tried several different methods and to no avail; everything sticks. I’ve tried oiling the pans in the oven for an hour at 500 degrees and inverting the pan. I’ve tried it on the top of the stove. Please help.

Elana, good news. My friends at America’s Test Kitchen sent me the information below from a 2003 issue of their magazine “Cook’s Illustrated” that should assist you. For everything you wanted to know about caring for your cast-iron skillet but were afraid to ask, check out their video at https://bit.ly/2zRoh4q.

You are not alone in trying to keep them in tip-top shape so all of your dishes come out perfect. If you haven’t subscribed to their magazines or their cooking newsletters, I highly recommend you do. If you are not familiar, their PBS television show is all about culinary education; it is not a reality cooking show with all of the “heated” time-based competitions. You will learn cooking techniques to enhance your culinary skills.

Steps: “1. Rub the pan with fine steel wool. 2. Wipe out loose dirt and rust with a cloth. 3. Place the pan on the burner over medium-low heat and add enough vegetable oil to coat the pan heavily. Heat for 5 minutes, or until the handle is too hot to touch. Turn off the burner. 4. Add enough salt to form a liquidy paste. Wearing a work or gardening glove, scrub with a thick wads of paper towels, steadying the pan with a potholder. Repeat steps 3 and 4 until the pan is slick and black. 5. Rinse the pan thoroughly in hot water, wipe dry, and then coat with a thin film of vegetable oil, wiping off any excess with paper towels.”

I enjoy cooking in cast-iron pans because it is able to withstand high heat, especially when frying, searing or blackening. It retains heat well and can go from stovetop to oven … or place on the barbecue or over a campfire. Cornbread and cobblers are easy to bake in cast iron; I find it makes a moist corn bread. Just be careful, the handle gets hot.

Cast-iron cookware has been around for hundreds of years and was quite popular during the early part of the 20th century. Most kitchens had one; they were durable and fairly inexpensive. During the mid-1960s they began to decline in use when Teflon and nonstick pans were the craze. Grandma’s hand-me-down cast-iron pans were popular tag sale items and plentiful at secondhand shops.

As author Stephen King said, “Sooner or later, everything old is new again.” This holds true here, too. Cooking with cast iron is hot again. Displays of the cookware, and magazines and cookbooks devoted to this style of cooking are plentiful.

If there is only one book you want to have on the topic, “Cook It In Cast Iron: Kitchen-Tested Recipes from the One Pan That Does it All,” by the editors at America’s Test Kitchen (2015, $29.95) is the one.

Before getting into the recipes, the information at the beginning talks about cast-iron discoveries, why a cast-iron skillet belongs in every kitchen, evaluating cast-iron skillets, the science of seasoning and how to maintain your cast-iron skillet, troubleshooting, and busting myths.

The cast-iron personality test helps you determine which pan is right for you.

Each recipe has a headnote, “Why This Recipe Works.” It provides useful and interesting information about the preparation of the dish. It is one of the features I enjoy in America’s Test Kitchen publications.

For the recipe for chocolate chip skillet cookies, visit https://bit.ly/2yfH3QX. Recipes courtesy of America’s Test Kitchen.

Why this recipe works: Baked brie topped with jam or fruit — we like dried apricots and honey — is a popular party snack, and for good reason.

When the cheese is warmed, it magically transforms into a rich, dippable concoction.

Baking the cheese in a cast-iron skillet seemed like a no-brainer; since the skillet holds onto heat so well, it would keep the cheese in the ideal, luscious, fluid state longer than any other pan.

For sweet and creamy flavor in every bite, we re-engineered the traditional whole wheel of baked brie by trimming off the rind (which doesn’t melt that well) and slicing the cheese into cubes.

The result? Our honey-apricot mixture was evenly distributed throughout the dish, not just spooned on top.

We finished the dish with an extra drizzle of honey and some minced chives to reinforce the sweet-savory flavor profile. Be sure to use a firm, fairly unripe Brie for this recipe. Serve with crackers or Melba toast.

Adjust oven rack to middle position and heat oven to 400 degrees. Microwave apricots, 2 tablespoons honey, rosemary, salt, and pepper in medium bowl until apricots are softened and mixture is fragrant, about 1 minute, stirring halfway through microwaving. Add brie and toss to combine.

Transfer mixture to 10-inch, cast-iron skillet and bake until cheese is melted, 10 to 15 minutes. Drizzle with remaining 2 tablespoons honey and sprinkle with chives. Serve. Serves 8 to 10.

Why this recipe works: Frittatas are similar to omelets but much easier to make: All ingredients are combined at once, so you need much less hands-on time during cooking.

For a perfect, tender frittata packed with flavor, we started with 10 large eggs mixed with half-and-half. The water in the dairy helped create steam so the eggs puffed up, and the fat kept the frittata tender.

We used the microwave to quickly wilt fresh spinach and then drained it to keep the frittata from becoming waterlogged.

Feta cheese and oregano added great savory flavor.

Actively stirring and scraping the egg mixture during cooking kept the eggs from becoming tough and ensured quicker cooking.

Shaking the skillet helped the eggs distribute properly, and cooking the frittata on the stovetop created some nice browning on the bottom.

We then transferred the skillet to the broiler, where the high heat helped the frittata puff a little more and set without overcooking the bottom.

The cast iron was perfectly at home under the broiler, unlike nonstick pans with plastic handles and coatings that shouldn’t be exposed to intense heat.

Once we moved the skillet from the broiler to a wire rack, the residual heat from the cast iron helped the frittata finish cooking.

Adjust oven rack 6 inches from broiler element and heat broiler. Microwave spinach and 1/2cup water in large bowl, covered, until spinach is wilted and decreased in volume by half, about 4 minutes.

Remove bowl from microwave and keep covered for 1 minute. Carefully remove cover, allowing steam to escape away from you, and transfer spinach to colander set in sink. Using back of rubber spatula, gently press spinach against colander to release excess liquid. Transfer spinach to cutting board and chop coarse. Return spinach to colander and press second time.

Using fork, beat eggs, half-and-half, 3/4teaspoon salt, and 1/2teaspoon pepper in bowl until thoroughly combined and mixture is pure yellow; do not overbeat. Stir in 1/2cup feta.

Heat 10-inch, cast-iron skillet over medium heat for 3 minutes. Add oil and heat until shimmering. Add onion and cook until softened, about 5 minutes. Stir in garlic and oregano and cook until fragrant, about 30 seconds. Stir in spinach and cook until uniformly wilted and glossy, about 2 minutes.

Add egg mixture and, using heat-resistant rubber spatula, constantly and firmly scrape along bottom and sides of skillet until eggs form large curds and spatula leaves trail on bottom of skillet but eggs are still moist, 1 to 2 minutes. Shake skillet to distribute eggs evenly. Sprinkle with remaining 1/4cup feta and gently press into eggs with spatula.

Transfer skillet to oven and broil until center of frittata is puffed and surface is just beginning to brown, 3 to 5 minutes; when cut into with paring knife, eggs should be slightly wet and runny.

Using potholders, transfer skillet to wire rack and let frittata rest for 5 minutes. Being careful of hot skillet handle, run spatula around edge of skillet to loosen frittata, then slide frittata out of skillet onto cutting board. Cut frittata into wedges and serve warm or at room temperature. Serves 4 to 6

Union League Café celebrates 25 years: 1032 Chapel St., New Haven. Throughout October, serving classics from the original 1993 menu in a three course, pre-fixe with wine pairings for $79 per person plus tax and gratuity ($55 per person plus tax and gratuity without wine pairings). Partnering with New Haven Farms and will donate 25 percent of proceeds from iconic confit de canard appetizer for the month of October. Menu and reservations at http://unionleaguecafe.com/menu/.

Consiglio’s Cooking Demonstration and Dinner: featuring Angelo Durante from Durante’s Pasta and Master Cheesemaker Jeshar Zeneli from Liuzzi Cheese Oct. 11, 6:30 p.m., Consiglio’s Restaurant, 165 Wooster St., New Haven, 203-865-4489 (reservations required), $75 (beverages, tax and gratuity not included). https://bit.ly/2Nd0xAg.

Cooking Class: Ravioli Workshop: Oct. 12, 6:30 pm, Chef’s Emporium, 449 Boston Post Road, Orange, $59.99. Reservations at 203-799-2665. Reservations at https://bit.ly/2pEJ19M.

Consiglio’s Murder Mystery Dinner: “What are you Wearing?” Oct. 12. Doors at 6 p.m., dinner and show at 7, Consiglio’s Restaurant, 165 Wooster St., New Haven, reservations at 203-865-4489 https://bit.ly/2O3TQzQ. $65 includes dinner and show (beverages, tax and gratuity not included).

“Chefs Of Our Kitchen” celebrates Oktoberfest with BAR: Oct. 17, 6:15 reception; 7 p.m. dinner. Gateway Community College, 20 Church St., New Haven, 203-285-2617. Watch the famous BAR salad being made and learn about the beer they brew at BAR. $65 benefits Gateway Community College Foundation. Parking in Temple Street garage. Bring ticket for validation. Tickets at https://bit.ly/2zTfUWf.

Alforno Wine Dinner: Oct. 30, 6:30 p.m., Alforno, 1654 Boston Post Road, Old Saybrook, reservations at 860-399-4166, $75, plus tax and gratuity. Complete menu at http://alforno.net/events/.

Category: Skillets  Tags: ,  Comments off

Care and feeding of your cast iron frying pan (plus perfect recipes)

FOUND: Elana Keyes, of Guilford, wrote, “How do you season a cast-iron frying pan? I’ve tried several different methods and to no avail; everything sticks. I’ve tried oiling the pans in the oven for an hour at 500 degrees and inverting the pan. I’ve tried it on the top of the stove. Please help.

Elana, good news. My friends at America’s Test Kitchen sent me the information below from a 2003 issue of their magazine “Cook’s Illustrated” that should assist you. For everything you wanted to know about caring for your cast-iron skillet but were afraid to ask, check out their video at https://bit.ly/2zRoh4q.

You are not alone in trying to keep them in tip-top shape so all of your dishes come out perfect. If you haven’t subscribed to their magazines or their cooking newsletters, I highly recommend you do. If you are not familiar, their PBS television show is all about culinary education; it is not a reality cooking show with all of the “heated” time-based competitions. You will learn cooking techniques to enhance your culinary skills.

Steps: “1. Rub the pan with fine steel wool. 2. Wipe out loose dirt and rust with a cloth. 3. Place the pan on the burner over medium-low heat and add enough vegetable oil to coat the pan heavily. Heat for 5 minutes, or until the handle is too hot to touch. Turn off the burner. 4. Add enough salt to form a liquidy paste. Wearing a work or gardening glove, scrub with a thick wads of paper towels, steadying the pan with a potholder. Repeat steps 3 and 4 until the pan is slick and black. 5. Rinse the pan thoroughly in hot water, wipe dry, and then coat with a thin film of vegetable oil, wiping off any excess with paper towels.”

I enjoy cooking in cast-iron pans because it is able to withstand high heat, especially when frying, searing or blackening. It retains heat well and can go from stovetop to oven … or place on the barbecue or over a campfire. Cornbread and cobblers are easy to bake in cast iron; I find it makes a moist corn bread. Just be careful, the handle gets hot.

Cast-iron cookware has been around for hundreds of years and was quite popular during the early part of the 20th century. Most kitchens had one; they were durable and fairly inexpensive. During the mid-1960s they began to decline in use when Teflon and nonstick pans were the craze. Grandma’s hand-me-down cast-iron pans were popular tag sale items and plentiful at secondhand shops.

As author Stephen King said, “Sooner or later, everything old is new again.” This holds true here, too. Cooking with cast iron is hot again. Displays of the cookware, and magazines and cookbooks devoted to this style of cooking are plentiful.

If there is only one book you want to have on the topic, “Cook It In Cast Iron: Kitchen-Tested Recipes from the One Pan That Does it All,” by the editors at America’s Test Kitchen (2015, $29.95) is the one.

Before getting into the recipes, the information at the beginning talks about cast-iron discoveries, why a cast-iron skillet belongs in every kitchen, evaluating cast-iron skillets, the science of seasoning and how to maintain your cast-iron skillet, troubleshooting, and busting myths.

The cast-iron personality test helps you determine which pan is right for you.

Each recipe has a headnote, “Why This Recipe Works.” It provides useful and interesting information about the preparation of the dish. It is one of the features I enjoy in America’s Test Kitchen publications.

For the recipe for chocolate chip skillet cookies, visit https://bit.ly/2yfH3QX. Recipes courtesy of America’s Test Kitchen.

Why this recipe works: Baked brie topped with jam or fruit — we like dried apricots and honey — is a popular party snack, and for good reason.

When the cheese is warmed, it magically transforms into a rich, dippable concoction.

Baking the cheese in a cast-iron skillet seemed like a no-brainer; since the skillet holds onto heat so well, it would keep the cheese in the ideal, luscious, fluid state longer than any other pan.

For sweet and creamy flavor in every bite, we re-engineered the traditional whole wheel of baked brie by trimming off the rind (which doesn’t melt that well) and slicing the cheese into cubes.

The result? Our honey-apricot mixture was evenly distributed throughout the dish, not just spooned on top.

We finished the dish with an extra drizzle of honey and some minced chives to reinforce the sweet-savory flavor profile. Be sure to use a firm, fairly unripe Brie for this recipe. Serve with crackers or Melba toast.

Adjust oven rack to middle position and heat oven to 400 degrees. Microwave apricots, 2 tablespoons honey, rosemary, salt, and pepper in medium bowl until apricots are softened and mixture is fragrant, about 1 minute, stirring halfway through microwaving. Add brie and toss to combine.

Transfer mixture to 10-inch, cast-iron skillet and bake until cheese is melted, 10 to 15 minutes. Drizzle with remaining 2 tablespoons honey and sprinkle with chives. Serve. Serves 8 to 10.

Why this recipe works: Frittatas are similar to omelets but much easier to make: All ingredients are combined at once, so you need much less hands-on time during cooking.

For a perfect, tender frittata packed with flavor, we started with 10 large eggs mixed with half-and-half. The water in the dairy helped create steam so the eggs puffed up, and the fat kept the frittata tender.

We used the microwave to quickly wilt fresh spinach and then drained it to keep the frittata from becoming waterlogged.

Feta cheese and oregano added great savory flavor.

Actively stirring and scraping the egg mixture during cooking kept the eggs from becoming tough and ensured quicker cooking.

Shaking the skillet helped the eggs distribute properly, and cooking the frittata on the stovetop created some nice browning on the bottom.

We then transferred the skillet to the broiler, where the high heat helped the frittata puff a little more and set without overcooking the bottom.

The cast iron was perfectly at home under the broiler, unlike nonstick pans with plastic handles and coatings that shouldn’t be exposed to intense heat.

Once we moved the skillet from the broiler to a wire rack, the residual heat from the cast iron helped the frittata finish cooking.

Adjust oven rack 6 inches from broiler element and heat broiler. Microwave spinach and 1/2cup water in large bowl, covered, until spinach is wilted and decreased in volume by half, about 4 minutes.

Remove bowl from microwave and keep covered for 1 minute. Carefully remove cover, allowing steam to escape away from you, and transfer spinach to colander set in sink. Using back of rubber spatula, gently press spinach against colander to release excess liquid. Transfer spinach to cutting board and chop coarse. Return spinach to colander and press second time.

Using fork, beat eggs, half-and-half, 3/4teaspoon salt, and 1/2teaspoon pepper in bowl until thoroughly combined and mixture is pure yellow; do not overbeat. Stir in 1/2cup feta.

Heat 10-inch, cast-iron skillet over medium heat for 3 minutes. Add oil and heat until shimmering. Add onion and cook until softened, about 5 minutes. Stir in garlic and oregano and cook until fragrant, about 30 seconds. Stir in spinach and cook until uniformly wilted and glossy, about 2 minutes.

Add egg mixture and, using heat-resistant rubber spatula, constantly and firmly scrape along bottom and sides of skillet until eggs form large curds and spatula leaves trail on bottom of skillet but eggs are still moist, 1 to 2 minutes. Shake skillet to distribute eggs evenly. Sprinkle with remaining 1/4cup feta and gently press into eggs with spatula.

Transfer skillet to oven and broil until center of frittata is puffed and surface is just beginning to brown, 3 to 5 minutes; when cut into with paring knife, eggs should be slightly wet and runny.

Using potholders, transfer skillet to wire rack and let frittata rest for 5 minutes. Being careful of hot skillet handle, run spatula around edge of skillet to loosen frittata, then slide frittata out of skillet onto cutting board. Cut frittata into wedges and serve warm or at room temperature. Serves 4 to 6

Union League Café celebrates 25 years: 1032 Chapel St., New Haven. Throughout October, serving classics from the original 1993 menu in a three course, pre-fixe with wine pairings for $79 per person plus tax and gratuity ($55 per person plus tax and gratuity without wine pairings). Partnering with New Haven Farms and will donate 25 percent of proceeds from iconic confit de canard appetizer for the month of October. Menu and reservations at http://unionleaguecafe.com/menu/.

Consiglio’s Cooking Demonstration and Dinner: featuring Angelo Durante from Durante’s Pasta and Master Cheesemaker Jeshar Zeneli from Liuzzi Cheese Oct. 11, 6:30 p.m., Consiglio’s Restaurant, 165 Wooster St., New Haven, 203-865-4489 (reservations required), $75 (beverages, tax and gratuity not included). https://bit.ly/2Nd0xAg.

Cooking Class: Ravioli Workshop: Oct. 12, 6:30 pm, Chef’s Emporium, 449 Boston Post Road, Orange, $59.99. Reservations at 203-799-2665. Reservations at https://bit.ly/2pEJ19M.

Consiglio’s Murder Mystery Dinner: “What are you Wearing?” Oct. 12. Doors at 6 p.m., dinner and show at 7, Consiglio’s Restaurant, 165 Wooster St., New Haven, reservations at 203-865-4489 https://bit.ly/2O3TQzQ. $65 includes dinner and show (beverages, tax and gratuity not included).

“Chefs Of Our Kitchen” celebrates Oktoberfest with BAR: Oct. 17, 6:15 reception; 7 p.m. dinner. Gateway Community College, 20 Church St., New Haven, 203-285-2617. Watch the famous BAR salad being made and learn about the beer they brew at BAR. $65 benefits Gateway Community College Foundation. Parking in Temple Street garage. Bring ticket for validation. Tickets at https://bit.ly/2zTfUWf.

Alforno Wine Dinner: Oct. 30, 6:30 p.m., Alforno, 1654 Boston Post Road, Old Saybrook, reservations at 860-399-4166, $75, plus tax and gratuity. Complete menu at http://alforno.net/events/.

Category: Cookware Pans  Tags: ,  Comments off

KitchenAid fights competitors with ‘maker’ campaign | CMO Strategy …

Do you have well-worn knives, dough-covered hands or blisters? Then you have the marks of a maker, a cuisine-linked identity that KitchenAid is promoting in its first brand campaign, debuting Thursday.

“We’ve always recognized that KitchenAid was focused on a consumer who is unique,” says Christina Hoskins, senior brand manager at KitchenAid, which is owned by Whirlpool. She notes that the kitchen brand has run product-focused campaigns in the past, including 2016’s “Yours for the making,” but that the new marketing push is a higher-level brand campaign for KitchenAid overall. “We spent several months learning more about the consumer we serve,” she adds. “We recognize that cooking for them and being a baker, or a maker, in the kitchen is part of who they are—part of their identity.”

Founded 99 years ago, KitchenAid celebrates its 100th anniversary next year. Yet unlike a century earlier, it is now battling a host of competitors in the kitchen, including startups like Misen, a Brooklyn-based brand that used crowdfunding to start its business, and established brands like LG and Samsung, which have expanded their digitally connected wares to include appliances such as refrigerators. Amazon is also entering the space and debuted its own Alexa-connected microwave oven, through its private label AmazonBasics brand, earlier this month.

Hoskins says that KitchenAid has an edge over such rivals because it caters to consumers who love to cook, rather than those who view it as a chore. Indeed, the 60-second anthem spot for the new campaign artistically illustrates baking, chopping and blending in a way that goes above and beyond your average parent dumping a box of mac and cheese onto the stove for family dinner. The campaign will appear in print and across digital and social outlets. In addition to the anthem spot, a dozen smaller clips will run.

While KitchenAid, which worked with long-time agencies Digitas and MSL on the campaign, did not specify the budget, Hoskins says it was a bigger investment than in recent years. In 2017, KitchenAid spent $9 million on measured media in the U.S., according to Kantar Media. Whirlpool does not break out sales for KitchenAid, but the parent company, which also owns Maytag and acquired recipe site Yummly last year, has seen sales grow steadily. The Benton Harbor, Michigan-based company reported sales of $21.3 billion last year, up 3 percent from 2016.

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Brooks to host Skillet Fest

VALDOSTA — It first began as a way to spotlight local agriculture; and now, it acts as a vessel to unite the community. 

The Eighth Annual Skillet Festival will be hosted by the Brooks County Chamber of Commerce 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 20, at the Brooks County Courthouse Lawn, 100 E. Screven St.

To kickoff the event, there will be a Cast Iron 5K Run/Walk beginning 8 a.m. Registration is $20 until Friday, Oct. 19, and will increase to $25 Saturday.

Medals will be given to the top male and female in each age division, overall male and female and masters male and female.

Proceeds will benefit the Boys and Girls Club, and registration can be completed on runsignup.com.

The Skillet Festival is a food fair, artisan craft show and vintage market, said Kelly Hanks, festival director and chamber executive director.

“We’re sort of proud of it here in Brooks County,” she said. “We work really, really hard throughout the year to get some special vendors to attend.”

Hanks said the vendors at Skillet are one-of-a-kind, not attending any other festivals but Skillet.

There will be vendors from three states this year. Hanks said guests come from areas outside of Brooks County, including North Florida.

“People come in to visit their families and stay overnight and go to the Skillet Festival,” she said. “People come from hours away to attend, and we have a really good reach for our vendors.”

A staple in the festival is the skillet toss where competitors toss skillets to get them closest to a stake.

Hanks said the event has gained a Guinness World Record title for most skillets simultaneously tossed.

The toss has its first title sponsor this year, Next Era Energy Resources, and it will also include children age divisions.

There will be a petting zoo, quilt show, face painting, games, dog show and performances from local dance groups such as SweetE’s and Latoya’s School of Dance.

Free parking will be available at the First Baptist Church, 509 W. Screven St. A free shuttle service will be provided by the Brooks County High School FFA to transport guests to Skillet.

No parking is allowed around the Courthouse Square block, according to organizers. Handicap parking by permit only is available at the Quitman Church of Christ, 111 S. Stevens St.

Visit skilletfest.com, or search for Brooks County Skillet Festival on Facebook and Pinterest for more information. The Twitter and Instagram handles are @bcskilletfest. 

Amanda Usher is a reporter at The Valdosta Daily Times. She can be contacted at 229-244-3400 ext.1274.

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