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October 2, 2018 |

Archive for » October 2nd, 2018«

Fall Into Savings With October’s Best Things to Buy

“This month is prime time for shoppers to stock up on some autumn items and potentially get ahead of some holiday shopping,” says Sara Skirboll, shopping and trends expert for RetailMeNot. “Shoppers can use this month to update their fall wardrobe and get decked out in their favorite costumes, as well as get their homes and kitchens holiday guest-ready – while maybe checking off a few names from their holiday shopping list.”

Stack the Deck
Did the summer fly by without you purchasing outdoor accessories? Shoppers who waited are in luck, as October is a great time to shop for items like patio furniture and decor. With the outdoor season wrapping up, consumers can find the best prices now before it all clears out before the holidays.

Small-Bill Thrills
Roller coaster rides may evoke the feeling of summer, but many theme parks are open year-round or close only during the cold winter months. The weather in October is still perfect for enjoying outdoor rides, and it happens to be a lull period for most theme parks. Look for big savings and big fun!

Blue Jean Baby
Straight-leg, low-rise, skinny or boyfriend: Whatever denim pleasure shoppers prefer, it will be on sale this month. October is a great time to stock up on one of fall’s biggest staples. This autumn essential has already been flying off the shelves for back-to-school shoppers, but there’s more where that came from. As the cool weather approaches, retailers are starting to discount them and to make room for all of the fall and winter fashions to come before the holidays.

Spooky Savings
When October comes to mind, so does the sugar-fueled madness of Halloween. Between candy for trick-or-treaters and costumes for the family – including those for four-legged friends – the costs can really add up. Shoppers will see the deepest discounts on costumes and candy in the week leading up to Halloween. Retailers want all their inventory gone before the holiday passes — after all, what good is orange-and-black candy at Christmas? While shoppers may not have the best selection that week, they can still snag festive costumes and décor with a discount.

Host with the Most
Holiday gatherings are right around the corner, which makes October a great time to get your home ready for guests. Sales on big appliances started in September, but they continue into this month, ensuring that everyone can be a host with the most. Retailers are slashing prices now to make room for inventory on Black Friday and beyond. Shoppers prepping for a large family meal should make sure the kitchen is ready for action and take advantage of sales on items like Keurig coffee makers, microwaves and other small kitchen appliances as well.

About RetailMeNot, Inc.
RetailMeNot, Inc. (https://www.retailmenot.com/corp/) is a leading savings destination connecting consumers with retailers, restaurants and brands, both online and in-store. The company enables consumers across the globe to find hundreds of thousands of offers to save money while they shop or dine out. RetailMeNot, Inc. estimates that $4.8 billion in retailer sales were attributable to consumer transactions from paid digital offers in its marketplace in 2017, more than $560 million of which were attributable to its in-store solution. The RetailMeNot, Inc. portfolio of websites and mobile applications includes RetailMeNot.com in the United States; RetailMeNot.ca in Canada; VoucherCodes.co.uk in the United Kingdom; ma-reduc.com and Poulpeo.com in France; and GiftCardZen.com and Deals2Buy.com in North America. As wholly owned subsidiaries of Harland Clarke Holdings, RetailMeNot and Valassis, a leader in intelligent media delivery, are partnering to connect retailers and consumers through meaningful digital, mobile and print promotions both online and in store.

Media Contact:
Hillary White
RetailMeNot
hwhite@rmn.com
(832) 278-5615

SOURCE RetailMeNot

Category: Accessories  Tags: ,  Comments off

RIGHT AT HOME: Heavy metal in the kitchen – Odessa American …

Cast iron, once a common material for pots and pans, has tended in recent years to be used most visibly by either pro chefs or campers. Now it’s trending again in this fall’s kitchenware product previews.

Options range from basic skillets to grill pans to pots both diminutive (for sauces) and expansive (for stews and soups).

Chef Kevin Korman is about to open his new restaurant, Whitebird, in the Edwin Hotel in Chattanooga, Tennessee. On his menu: fondue, baked eggs and a savory Dutch pancake, all prepared using cast iron pans.

“Our cuisine is defined as Progressive Appalachian,” Korman says, “and cast-iron cooking played a large role in the history of Appalachia.”

The Tennessee Valley is rich in iron ore, so companies like Lodge Cast Iron set up home there. Korman will be using Lodge products in his kitchens, but aside from supporting a local maker, the material’s performance is what he cares about.

“Not only does cast iron retain heat better than anything else, the distribution of heat is really what makes it a winner,” Korman says. “Every part of the pan gives off an equal amount, so you don’t end up with certain areas that burn while others are still waiting to get some color. This was a big consideration when we were developing dishes for the menu.”

Korman recalls meals prepared on cast iron at his grandmother’s house, and he has carried on the tradition with his own family.

“I have several sizes that I use daily at home for just about everything,” he says. “Both of my daughters love to help me cook, so I hope to hand the pans down to them as they get older.”

Beyond durability, cast iron’s big selling point is the heat retention that Korman mentioned. But bear in mind that it doesn’t heat evenly initially, so always let the pan come to the needed temperature on the burner before adding ingredients. That way, you’ll get a nice crisp sear and a consistent cook with your cast iron.

New finishing methods are improving the wearability and performance of cast iron.

Today, makers like Finex in Portland, Oregon smooth and polish the pans’ interiors so that eggs and sauces don’t stick. An ergonomically designed, coiled-spring, wrapped-steel handle stays cooler than traditional handles, and the skillets are octagonal, making pouring and stirring easier. Cast-iron lids provide a flavor seal for steaming, simmering and braising.

The Museum of Modern Art’s gift shop has a cast-iron item this season: the Railway Dutch Oven, made in Holland out of recycled iron railway ties. A built-in thermometer helps monitor cooking progress, and the tool can be used stovetop or oven.

Williams-Sonoma stocks the French brand Staub: There’s a red or blue-enameled two-handled skillet that goes nicely from stovetop or oven to table, and a glass-lidded braiser in black, grenadine or sapphire. Also at the retailer: a little iron saucepot with a platform base, designed to use on grills. It comes with a silicone-handled, mop-headed basting brush for glazing barbecued foods.

Seasoning is key to optimizing cast iron’s performance; it helps “cure” the iron so food doesn’t stick, and over time helps impart layers of flavor.

To season a new pan yourself, lightly wash it as directed, then add a tablespoon of oil and massage it thoroughly into the iron, wiping any excess with a paper towel. Place the pan in an oven at 350 degrees Fahrenheit and let it “bake” for about an hour. Remove and wipe off any excess oil before using or storing.

You can buy pre-seasoned pans, which just need a little refresh once in a while.

Williams-Sonoma, Sur La Table and Crate Barrel all carry several of Lodge’s pre-seasoned cast-iron pieces.

But it’s still a good idea to refresh the seasoning if you use your pans often. It can even be done stovetop: Heat the pan until it’s hot, swab some oil into it, then let it cool.

While some people prefer not to use soap and water to clean cast iron, thinking it removes the oil coating, Serious Eats’ chief culinary consultant Kenji Lopez-Alt says it’s fine to do so.

“The one thing you shouldn’t do? Let it soak in the sink,” he says. “Try to minimize the time it takes from when you start cleaning to when you dry and re-season your pan.”

Category: Skillets  Tags: ,  Comments off

Ask Matt: ‘SNL’ Cold Opens, ‘Big Bang’ Trivia, The ‘Modern Family’ Death Lottery, and More

Welcome back to the QA with TV critic (also known to some TV fans as their “TV therapist”) Matt Roush, who’ll try to address whatever you love, loathe, are confused or frustrated or thrilled by in today’s vast TV landscape. One caution: This is a spoiler-free zone, so we won’t be addressing upcoming storylines here unless it’s already common knowledge. Please send your questions and comments to askmatt@tvinsider.com (or use the form at the end of the column) and follow me on Twitter. Look for Ask Matt columns on most Tuesdays and Fridays.

 

Running Cold, or Hot, on SNL

Question: Why are the opening moments of Saturday Night Live called a “Cold Open?” What would be a “hot” open, a pre-recorded open? Thanks for all of your info you post each week. — Walter

Matt Roush: Seems a fair question, especially after this weekend’s season premiere opened with so much heat, featuring Matt Damon’s over-the-top impersonation of Judge Kavanaugh. The phrase has nothing to do with temperature and all to do with timing. The “cold open” is a term referring to any opening scene that throws you right into the action without any set-up or title sequence. Lots of shows use them, but SNL tends to make more noise than most, opening with whatever is the most buzzed-about incident of the moment. (I only wish the rest of the episode, besides some biting moments on “Weekend Update,” had measured up. Otherwise, it was a painful start to the season.)


Kanye West Claims He Was ‘Bullied’ Over Trump Support at ‘SNL’

He was wearing one a ‘MAGA’ hat onstage at the end of the show.

Magnetism in a Big Bang Kitchen

Question: On The Big Bang Theory, what are those round objects on the side of Howard and Bernadette’s refrigerator? My mom thinks they are magnets. — MS

Matt Roush: Lots of Internet buzz about these unusual kitchen accessories. By all accounts, they are magnetized—but they’re actually small containers, often used for holding spices. As SNL’s Church Lady used to say: How convenient!


See How the ‘Big Bang Theory’ Cast Has Changed Over 12 Seasons (PHOTOS)

The show is one of the longest running series on TV.

When Mourning Comes on Modern Family

Question: I agree with those who feel that Modern Family killing Stella, the dog, does not warrant a three-episode arc nor affects all the characters. But DeDe’s death would. Do you agree? — Gwen

Matt Roush: This who’s-gonna-die speculation is getting awfully morbid, making me wish the producers hadn’t teased the fact that there will be a “significant” death on the show this season. (This is why I prefer my TV without spoilers.) Next to the dog, Shelley Long’s character of Jay’s first wife (and mother to Claire and Mitchell and their various offspring) seems the most popular, or at least expected, choice to go to the great sitcom beyond. It’s a loss that would strike a chord with most of the show’s major characters without affecting the core ensemble. Whatever happens, I still wish the show had chosen to let this passage come as a surprise.


4 Storylines to Look Out For in ‘Modern Family’ Season 10

Including a guest role by ‘Schitt’s Creek’ star Dan Levy.

A Late Start for ABC’s Tuesday Lineup

Question: Where is Splitting Up Together with Jenna Fischer? It was on ABC, I think, and I can’t find any mention of it anywhere. I hope it is coming back. Thank you for any information you can provide. — Pat

Matt Roush: Be patient. The midseason sitcom co-starring Oliver Hudson was renewed and will return to ABC’s Tuesday lineup once they stop double-running Dancing With the Stars on Monday and Tuesday. (This dismal season, that’s a lot of mediocrity spread over two nights.) This is the latest launch of any network lineup, and it promises to be a big night for ABC, when on Oct. 16 the newly christened The Conners (formerly Roseanne) will return, joined by the premieres of promising new comedy The Kids Are Alright and Nathan Fillion’s new drama The Rookie, with the returns of black-ish and Splitting Up Together filling the 9/8c hour.


‘Splitting Up Together’: First Look at the Season 2 Key Art (PHOTO)

Post-season finale hook-up, the new season of the ABC family comedy is coming October 16.

Why Isn’t There Room for All in Peak TV?

Question: There’s a wide variety of shows on network, cable and streaming TV, so why isn’t there room for such gems as Galavant, Trial Error and other creative, enjoyable, funny shows? — Val

Matt Roush: A simple question that’s rather complicated to answer properly and succinctly. The bottom line here is the bottom line of the TV business, and even with so many expanding platforms, there will be wonderful shows that either fail to find their audience, are poorly scheduled and/or promoted, and possibly are just too niche in appeal to succeed in the long term in a mass marketplace. The fact that we got two seasons of both of these cult comedies (and in Galavant’s case, musical) was something of a miracle, although the jury apparently is still out on whether Trial Error will be able to find a new home for a third season.


Will Netflix Rescue More Favorites Like ‘Designated Survivor’ ‘Lucifer’?

Plus, find out what’s in store for ‘Lucifer’s streaming debut.

When You Can’t Set Your Clock By TV

Question: Why do many programs run over their 30 or 60 minute time period by a minute or two? I often record programs, and when I play them, the last minute or two of a story’s wrap-up is lost. The program is recorded precisely at 30 or 60 minutes but the broadcast lasted a minute or two longer. — Ellen, Margate, FL

Matt Roush: This practice has been going on for a long time—and it can be even more confusing with certain cable programs that produce oversized episodes running 15 or more minutes longer than the usual hour with commercials. Those with DVR recorders tend to have less of an issue with this, because the programmers generally provide information about which episodes are expected to run a minute or so longer, and generally it works (although it still sometimes lops off the last few seconds of a show—especially noticeable if you’re a fan of Chuck Lorre’s vanity cards). The reason for these overruns is very old-school, with schedulers believing if a popular show runs into another show’s time period, it may keep viewers from turning between episodes to the competition. This usually ends up just annoying viewers for the reasons you state in your question. If your device allows you to do it, I always recommend recording a few minutes beyond the allotted time slot—or even recording the following show just to be safe.


Tell Us Your TV Faves, and We’ll Tell You Which New Shows to Watch

Figure out what to watch this season, based on what you’ve watched before.

Who Does The Deuce Have to (Bleep) to Get an Emmy?

Question: I’m still digesting the Emmys hits and misses, and it hit me that HBO’s The Deuce, which I thought was one of the best new shows on TV last season as well as one of the best dramas, period, seems to have been shockingly overlooked. I understand (but do not condone nor agree with) leaving out James Franco. The stories that came out in the wake of the #MeToo movement probably cost him an Oscar nomination(s), and looks to have affected him here as well. A shame, because his performance—as twins no less, which shockingly didn’t help Ewan McGregor to a nomination for Fargo either—is stunningly good. IMO (much) better than nominees Ed Harris and Jeffrey Wright in Westworld. Same with his co-star, Maggie Gyllenhaal. I’m wondering if it was a combination of the above (in Franco’s case) mixed with the series’ subject matter, which is gritty and tough to watch, but expertly done. Not to denigrate those who WERE nominated, but for me, leaving out others who are as deserving if not more so only undercuts the accolades for those who made the (sometimes) dubious cut. — Michael


HBO Releases New Footage of ‘Game of Thrones,’ ‘Big Little Lies’ More (VIDEO)

They also released sneak peeks at ‘Veep,’ ‘Barry,’ ‘The Deuce,’ and more.

Matt Roush: Before we put this year’s Emmys in the rear-view mirror, this oversight is worth noting, especially with the second season currently underway on HBO and the acknowledgement that it will enjoy only a three-year run, with next season being the last. It is surprising, given the production quality of recreating the sleazy 1970s at the very least, that The Deuce didn’t receive a single nomination, not even in the technical areas. I realize there’s little room left over when buzzier shows like Game of Thrones and Westworld each reap over 20 nominations, but this deserved better, and so did its stars, most notably James Franco and, for me, Maggie Gyllenhaal, who I hope gets noticed for her work this season. What a fascinating character. Still, it’s entirely possible this will stay under the radar, much like David Simon’s other neglected gems for HBO, including The Wire and Treme.

 

That’s all for now. Thanks as always for reading, and remember that I can’t do this without your participation, so please keep sending questions and comments about TV to askmatt@tvinsider.com or shoot me a line on Twitter (@TVGMMattRoush), and you can also submit questions via the handy form below. Please include a first name in your question.

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RIGHT AT HOME: Heavy metal in the kitchen

Cast iron, once a common material for pots and pans, has tended in recent years to be used most visibly by either pro chefs or campers. Now it’s trending again in this fall’s kitchenware product previews.

Options range from basic skillets to grill pans to pots both diminutive (for sauces) and expansive (for stews and soups).

Chef Kevin Korman is about to open his new restaurant, Whitebird, in the Edwin Hotel in Chattanooga, Tennessee. On his menu: fondue, baked eggs and a savory Dutch pancake, all prepared using cast iron pans.

“Our cuisine is defined as Progressive Appalachian,” Korman says, “and cast-iron cooking played a large role in the history of Appalachia.”

The Tennessee Valley is rich in iron ore, so companies like Lodge Cast Iron set up home there. Korman will be using Lodge products in his kitchens, but aside from supporting a local maker, the material’s performance is what he cares about.

“Not only does cast iron retain heat better than anything else, the distribution of heat is really what makes it a winner,” Korman says. “Every part of the pan gives off an equal amount, so you don’t end up with certain areas that burn while others are still waiting to get some color. This was a big consideration when we were developing dishes for the menu.”

Korman recalls meals prepared on cast iron at his grandmother’s house, and he has carried on the tradition with his own family.

“I have several sizes that I use daily at home for just about everything,” he says. “Both of my daughters love to help me cook, so I hope to hand the pans down to them as they get older.”

Beyond durability, cast iron’s big selling point is the heat retention that Korman mentioned. But bear in mind that it doesn’t heat evenly initially, so always let the pan come to the needed temperature on the burner before adding ingredients. That way, you’ll get a nice crisp sear and a consistent cook with your cast iron.

New finishing methods are improving the wearability and performance of cast iron.

Today, makers like Finex in Portland, Oregon smooth and polish the pans’ interiors so that eggs and sauces don’t stick. An ergonomically designed, coiled-spring, wrapped-steel handle stays cooler than traditional handles, and the skillets are octagonal, making pouring and stirring easier. Cast-iron lids provide a flavor seal for steaming, simmering and braising.

The Museum of Modern Art’s gift shop has a cast-iron item this season: the Railway Dutch Oven, made in Holland out of recycled iron railway ties. A built-in thermometer helps monitor cooking progress, and the tool can be used stovetop or oven.

Williams-Sonoma stocks the French brand Staub: There’s a red or blue-enameled two-handled skillet that goes nicely from stovetop or oven to table, and a glass-lidded braiser in black, grenadine or sapphire. Also at the retailer: a little iron saucepot with a platform base, designed to use on grills. It comes with a silicone-handled, mop-headed basting brush for glazing barbecued foods.

Seasoning is key to optimizing cast iron’s performance; it helps “cure” the iron so food doesn’t stick, and over time helps impart layers of flavor.

To season a new pan yourself, lightly wash it as directed, then add a tablespoon of oil and massage it thoroughly into the iron, wiping any excess with a paper towel. Place the pan in an oven at 350 degrees Fahrenheit and let it “bake” for about an hour. Remove and wipe off any excess oil before using or storing.

You can buy pre-seasoned pans, which just need a little refresh once in a while.

Williams-Sonoma, Sur La Table and Crate Barrel all carry several of Lodge’s pre-seasoned cast-iron pieces.

But it’s still a good idea to refresh the seasoning if you use your pans often. It can even be done stovetop: Heat the pan until it’s hot, swab some oil into it, then let it cool.

While some people prefer not to use soap and water to clean cast iron, thinking it removes the oil coating, Serious Eats’ chief culinary consultant Kenji Lopez-Alt says it’s fine to do so.

“The one thing you shouldn’t do? Let it soak in the sink,” he says. “Try to minimize the time it takes from when you start cleaning to when you dry and re-season your pan.”

Category: Cookware Pots  Tags: ,  Comments off

RIGHT AT HOME: Heavy metal in the kitchen

Cast iron, once a common material for pots and pans, has tended in recent years to be used most visibly by either pro chefs or campers. Now it’s trending again in this fall’s kitchenware product previews.

Options range from basic skillets to grill pans to pots both diminutive (for sauces) and expansive (for stews and soups).

Chef Kevin Korman is about to open his new restaurant, Whitebird, in the Edwin Hotel in Chattanooga, Tennessee. On his menu: fondue, baked eggs and a savory Dutch pancake, all prepared using cast iron pans.

“Our cuisine is defined as Progressive Appalachian,” Korman says, “and cast-iron cooking played a large role in the history of Appalachia.”

The Tennessee Valley is rich in iron ore, so companies like Lodge Cast Iron set up home there. Korman will be using Lodge products in his kitchens, but aside from supporting a local maker, the material’s performance is what he cares about.

“Not only does cast iron retain heat better than anything else, the distribution of heat is really what makes it a winner,” Korman says. “Every part of the pan gives off an equal amount, so you don’t end up with certain areas that burn while others are still waiting to get some color. This was a big consideration when we were developing dishes for the menu.”

Korman recalls meals prepared on cast iron at his grandmother’s house, and he has carried on the tradition with his own family.

“I have several sizes that I use daily at home for just about everything,” he says. “Both of my daughters love to help me cook, so I hope to hand the pans down to them as they get older.”

Beyond durability, cast iron’s big selling point is the heat retention that Korman mentioned. But bear in mind that it doesn’t heat evenly initially, so always let the pan come to the needed temperature on the burner before adding ingredients. That way, you’ll get a nice crisp sear and a consistent cook with your cast iron.

New finishing methods are improving the wearability and performance of cast iron.

Today, makers like Finex in Portland, Oregon smooth and polish the pans’ interiors so that eggs and sauces don’t stick. An ergonomically designed, coiled-spring, wrapped-steel handle stays cooler than traditional handles, and the skillets are octagonal, making pouring and stirring easier. Cast-iron lids provide a flavor seal for steaming, simmering and braising.

The Museum of Modern Art’s gift shop has a cast-iron item this season: the Railway Dutch Oven, made in Holland out of recycled iron railway ties. A built-in thermometer helps monitor cooking progress, and the tool can be used stovetop or oven.

Williams-Sonoma stocks the French brand Staub: There’s a red or blue-enameled two-handled skillet that goes nicely from stovetop or oven to table, and a glass-lidded braiser in black, grenadine or sapphire. Also at the retailer: a little iron saucepot with a platform base, designed to use on grills. It comes with a silicone-handled, mop-headed basting brush for glazing barbecued foods.

Seasoning is key to optimizing cast iron’s performance; it helps “cure” the iron so food doesn’t stick, and over time helps impart layers of flavor.

To season a new pan yourself, lightly wash it as directed, then add a tablespoon of oil and massage it thoroughly into the iron, wiping any excess with a paper towel. Place the pan in an oven at 350 degrees Fahrenheit and let it “bake” for about an hour. Remove and wipe off any excess oil before using or storing.

You can buy pre-seasoned pans, which just need a little refresh once in a while.

Williams-Sonoma, Sur La Table and Crate Barrel all carry several of Lodge’s pre-seasoned cast-iron pieces.

But it’s still a good idea to refresh the seasoning if you use your pans often. It can even be done stovetop: Heat the pan until it’s hot, swab some oil into it, then let it cool.

While some people prefer not to use soap and water to clean cast iron, thinking it removes the oil coating, Serious Eats’ chief culinary consultant Kenji Lopez-Alt says it’s fine to do so.

“The one thing you shouldn’t do? Let it soak in the sink,” he says. “Try to minimize the time it takes from when you start cleaning to when you dry and re-season your pan.”

Category: Skillets  Tags: ,  Comments off

Pampered Chef Eases Holiday Stress with New Fall 2018 Product Line

ADDISON, Ill.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Oct 2, 2018–This fall, Pampered Chef introduces no-fuss kitchen tools and cooking solutions to help you spend less time on stress-filled prep and more time enjoying special moments with the ones you love. Whether hosting an intimate cocktail party or Thanksgiving for forty, the beloved kitchenware brand has you covered.

“At Pampered Chef, we strive to develop tools and products that take the stress out of cooking and entertaining,” said Bill Bucklew, VP of product development at Pampered Chef. “This fall’s Quick Cooker launch was a milestone for us, as it was the culmination of years of market research, consumer insights and rigorous testing. This versatile tool gives families back that valuable time in the evening to reconnect after long days, while still enjoying delicious and healthy home-cooked meals.”

Highlights of Pampered Chef’s new fall 2018 products include:

Quick Cooker and Accessories Kit – Save up to five times the cost of restaurant delivery by cooking at home in the time it takes for your food to be delivered (

Forbes

). The Quick Cooker whips up your family’s favorites in a fraction of the time with 16 preprogrammed settings including steaming, slow cooking, searing and proofing, for everything from meat, rice and beans to desserts. Designed with user safety in mind, the steam-release valve is positioned away from the button so your hands stay safe, and the cooker itself was designed to stay cool even when cooking! The whole set ($285) includes a Quick Cooker ($240 on its own), Quick Cooker Springform Pan, Quick Cooker Ceramic Pot and Microwave Grip Set. The new Quick Cooker is the perfect for solution for anyone looking to spend less time cooking and more time enjoying fresh, homemade meals with the ones they love.Microwave Pasta Cooker – Preparing a fresh meal at home doesn’t have to be time consuming, and a proper desk lunch doesn’t need to be sad looking. Pampered Chef’s Microwave Pasta Cooker ($25) makes two servings of pasta or grains in approximately ten minutes, right in the microwave! The innovative silicone lid prevents water from boiling over while also doubling as a built-in strainer, so there’s even one less dish to wash.Baking Pans – Get your kids to sit and eat breakfast this fall thanks to Pampered Chef’s new Donut Pan ($25) and Waffle Stick Pan ($25). No need for fast food or a deep fryer, these new pans allow you to serve up your little one’s favorites right at home, and feature Pampered Chef’s signature nonstick coating and beautiful blue exterior. As a bonus, these pans are also great for baking up sweet treats free of possible allergens or gluten! Looking for something even more festive? The new Fall Harvest Cake Pan ($25) and Winter Snowman Snowflake Cake Pan ($25) churns out seasonal baked goods for a fraction of the cost of buying them from the bakery, perfect for those who like to bake their own gifts.Premium Cocktail Set – Build your confidence behind the bar with the right suite of tools. The Premium Cocktail Set ($99) includes a jigger, strainer, shaker, bar spoon, muddler, bottle opener and recipe card. Stock your #InstaWorthy bar cart with this must-have cocktail set to please all your eggnog enthusiasts, whiskey-on-the-rocks fans and dirty martini devotees, or gift it to the new homeowner or consummate entertainer in your life.Kitchen Paring Knife Set – Become your own chopped chef with these revamped fan favorites, perfect for cutting, slicing and pairing small food. Even better, when you purchase the set ($7.50), Pampered Chef will help provide three meals* to Feeding America®.

“Pampered Chef’s high-quality cooking tools provide the reliable help families need to create the perfect meals this fall,” says Bucklew. “Whether you’re a seasoned cook or looking to break away from frozen meals, we want to help you turn mealtime into memories with our time-saving, easy-to-use products.”

Pampered Chef products can be purchased through a local cooking consultant or at PamperedChef.com. All new fall 2018 products are available as of September 1.

*$0.30 helps provide 3 meals secured by Feeding America® on behalf of local member food banks. Pampered Chef® guarantees a minimum donation of $250,000 through the purchase of select Pampered Chef® products and other fundraising activities associated with the Round-Up from the Heart® campaign from Sept. 1, 2018–Aug. 31, 2019. Meal claim valid as of July 1, 2017, and subject to change.

About Pampered Chef

Pampered Chef, a Berkshire Hathaway company, is a leading provider of personalized, inspirational cooking solutions delivered by a community of 40,000 cooking consultants. For nearly 40 years, Pampered Chef has helped create countless mealtime moments with friends and family through high-quality, everyday cooking tools and inspiration, while providing each cooking consultant a flexible opportunity to build a business around his or her own lifestyle, goals and passions. For more information visit PamperedChef.com. Like us on Facebook at Facebook.com/PamperedChef or follow along at Instagram.com/PamperedChef.

View source version on businesswire.com:https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20181002005032/en/

CONTACT: for Pampered Chef

Meredith Braithwaite

mbraithwaite@agencyh5.com

312.374.8562

KEYWORD: UNITED STATES NORTH AMERICA ILLINOIS

INDUSTRY KEYWORD: WOMEN HOME GOODS PARENTING RETAIL FOOD/BEVERAGE WINE SPIRITS CONSUMER FAMILY

SOURCE: Pampered Chef

Copyright Business Wire 2018.

PUB: 10/02/2018 07:05 AM/DISC: 10/02/2018 07:05 AM

http://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20181002005032/en

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Topping up Flower Pot with coffee business – Fairbanks Daily News

FAIRBANKS — Shopping for flowers is a feel good activity, and there’s no doubt the first cup of coffee every day provides that same ambiance.

That’s why The Flower Pot’s owner Heather Carlson is adding bulk coffee and accessories to its repertoire — compliments of the popular Country Kitchen store, whose owners plan to retire by the end of the year.

“The Flower Pot is going to take the coffee portion of the business,” Kris Thiltgen said. She and her husband, Leonard, have operated Country Kitchen for many decades. “Our coffee customers are very devoted and will be delighted to hear the news.”

Located in Washington Plaza, the couple has decided to retire and had hoped to find a new owner to take over running the store. But that didn’t happen.

“The bad news is that there will be no sale of the rest of the business and we will begin closeout sales the first of October,” she added.

The coffee operation will move to The Flower Pot, 1035 Blair Road, behind the Mattress Ranch, between the New and Old Steese Highways. Coffee and related merchandise for sale will remain very similar to how it was set up at Country Kitchen.

“It will be very much the same mode as what they have,” Carlson said. “The only difference is everything surrounding the coffee will be more garden things.”

Carlson had been looking for some time to add a new dimension to her seasonal greenhouse business. She found it with coffee.

“This is the first thing that has the same feel good feeling I’ve been looking for,” she said.

This won’t be a cafe or a place to buy a single cup of coffee. The shop will sell bulk coffee and accessories. The new product line will also enable The Flower Pot to stay open year round. If all goes as planned, The Flower Pot will debut its new coffee business in early November. Watch for announcements as time approaches.

Carlson plans to continue the same Country Kitchen offerings: 35 varieties of coffee, including eight organic varieties. The Thiltgens said it was common for customers to purchase five to 10 pounds of coffee at a time. Carlson said she’ll also continue some of the Country Kitchen special promotions and the variety of accessories will also remain available.

“We’re not going to shrink it down,” Carlson said. “I think it’s gonna be a really good thing. Honestly, it fits my personality too.”

Every morning, when Carlson walks into The Flower Pot, she picks up a special coffee cup that belongs to her. The cup says, “Coffee First.” Everyone who works there knows that cup belongs to her.

Meanwhile, Country Kitchen is getting ready to close its doors and begins its close-out sales this month, planning to shut the doors for good Oct. 31. Next on their list is spending more time with grandchildren.

“We have had so many cards, cookies and well wishes from our customers that it has been overwhelming,” Thiltgen said. “It is perhaps not the way that we wanted to go, but we are looking forward to a new chapter in our lives.”

Reach columnist/community editor Kris Capps at kcapps@newsminer.com. Call her at the office 459-7546. Follow her on Twitter @FDNMKris.

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