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October 10, 2018 |

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Freedom Healthy Cooking Oil Range presents Kitchen India Expo-2018

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Freedom Healthy Cooking Oil Range presents Kitchen India Expo-2018

Hyderabad :  Traditions Event Management Marketing Pvt. Ltd and HITEX Hyderabad in association with Freedom Healthy Cooking Oil Range and Metalika Industries announced the 3rd Edition of “Freedom Kitchen India Expo 2018”, South India’s biggest kitchen show from October 26th to 28th 2018 at HITEX Exhibition Centre, Hyderabad. The Freedom Kitchen India Expo 2018 is an ideal destination for the passionate Indian, who loves his food and lives his life king size and are willing to experiment and explore new shows and entertainment options. The expo provides a great opportunity for the brands and marketers of kitchen products and appliances to interact with their target audience to increase their brand awareness.

Speaking on the occasion, Chef Puneet Mehta – Consultant Chef (Master Chef Finalist, Season-2) said, “Freedom Kitchen India Expo 2018, is bigger and better in its 3rd edition this year. The Expo envisages to encourage consumers to adopt a modern lifestyle and adopt the latest technology available to make cooking a family fun activity. We have the best global brands dealing with kitchen accessories, appliances and food ingredients, showcasing their USP’s at Expo 2018.We have also curated several live cookery shows by renowned chefs from Hyderabad. The 3 day show will also host Cookery contests for various categories of cooks by professional chef’s for passionate, amateurs and talented homemakers. Leading up-to the Freedom Kitchen India Expo 2018 we have also conducted special cooking contest ‘Kids cook offs’ for children. The Competition was held at renowned schools of Hyderabad.  The winners of the Kids Cook-off’s at schools will get a chance to show their talent at the grand finale to be held on the main stage at Freedom Kitchen India Expo 2018.”

Speaking about the Freedom Kitchen Expo 2018Mr.P. Chandra Shekhara Reddy, Vice President – Sales Marketing, Freedom Cooking Oil Range said, “Being a consumer-focused company, Freedom cooking oil range always looks for opportunities to associate and bring to its invaluable patrons interactive platforms to explore new ways to make cooking fun. The 3rd Edition of Freedom Kitchen India Expo 2018 is a unique platform that brings the sellers and consumers together under one roof in an exciting and innovative format which offers an environment to participate, learn, experiment and enjoy with the family. It is a pleasure to associate with The Kitchen India Expo 2018. We wish a large number of people visit the expo and have a great quality family time.”

According to Ms.Sharmila Jain, CEO, Metalika Industries, “We are happy to associate with Freedom Kitchen India Expo 2018 – a one-stop shop for all your kitchen needs. We are leaders in the household and commercial kitchen equipment since 1969 and offer our superior quality of kitchen equipment to the visitors to the expo at affordable prices. Hope the connoisseurs of Hyderabad will appreciate and patronize our collection.”

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HomeGoods plans Oct. 21 opening of Hiram store

Home décor store HomeGoods will open an 18,055-square-foot store in Hiram on Sunday, Oct. 21, at 8 a.m., a news release stated.

The new store is located in Hiram Pavilion shopping center at 5220 Jimmy Lee Smith Parkway. This will be the 21st HomeGoods in the Atlanta market.

HomeGoods expects to fill approximately 65 full- and part-time positions.

The store’s merchandise departments include furniture, rugs, lighting, decorative accessories, kitchen and dining, bedding, bath, kids’ décor and toys, pet accessories, storage, workspace, outdoor, gourmet, wellness and more.

In a news release, HomeGoods said it “provides an ever-changing selection of high-quality merchandise at excellent values.”

“Our amazing values, brand names, and vast assortment make HomeGoods an exciting destination for shoppers,” said John Ricciuti, President of HomeGoods. “With a large variety of special merchandise from around the world, customers will always find something thrilling in our treasure hunt environment at great values. We are happy to provide Hiram with a local HomeGoods.”

Regular store hours are Monday through Thursday 9:30 a.m. to 9:30 p.m.; Friday through Saturday 9:30 a.m. to 10 p.m.; and Sunday 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. Special Grand Opening Day hours will be from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m.

HomeGoods operates more than 650 stores across the country and is a division of The TJX Companies Inc.

As of May 5, TJX operated more than 4,000 stores including T.J. Maxx, Marshalls, HomeGoods, Sierra Trading Post and Homesense, as well as tjmaxx.com and sierratradingpost.com.

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HomeGoods plans Oct. 21 opening of Hiram store

Home décor store HomeGoods will open an 18,055-square-foot store in Hiram on Sunday, Oct. 21, at 8 a.m., a news release stated.

The new store is located in Hiram Pavilion shopping center at 5220 Jimmy Lee Smith Parkway. This will be the 21st HomeGoods in the Atlanta market.

HomeGoods expects to fill approximately 65 full- and part-time positions.

The store’s merchandise departments include furniture, rugs, lighting, decorative accessories, kitchen and dining, bedding, bath, kids’ décor and toys, pet accessories, storage, workspace, outdoor, gourmet, wellness and more.

In a news release, HomeGoods said it “provides an ever-changing selection of high-quality merchandise at excellent values.”

“Our amazing values, brand names, and vast assortment make HomeGoods an exciting destination for shoppers,” said John Ricciuti, President of HomeGoods. “With a large variety of special merchandise from around the world, customers will always find something thrilling in our treasure hunt environment at great values. We are happy to provide Hiram with a local HomeGoods.”

Regular store hours are Monday through Thursday 9:30 a.m. to 9:30 p.m.; Friday through Saturday 9:30 a.m. to 10 p.m.; and Sunday 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. Special Grand Opening Day hours will be from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m.

HomeGoods operates more than 650 stores across the country and is a division of The TJX Companies Inc.

As of May 5, TJX operated more than 4,000 stores including T.J. Maxx, Marshalls, HomeGoods, Sierra Trading Post and Homesense, as well as tjmaxx.com and sierratradingpost.com.

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Top Chef’s Tom Colicchio recommends Made In cookware

Can the right cookware make you a Top Chef? Tom Colicchio and Made In cookware believe that it is a brand that gets both the newbie chef and the foodie excited about cooking.

If you are a fan of Top Chef or a foodie, you know Chef Tom Colicchio. But, many foodies and home cooks may not be as familiar with Made In cookware. Recently, Chef Colicchio joined Made In cookware as an investor and advisor. Why did this cookware get Chef Colicchio’s stamp of approval?

Made In is a direct to consumer cookware company. The brand has focused on providing American-made stainless steel cookware at affordable prices. As the brand grew its following, the company has decided to expand beyond stainless steel. Based on real-time feedback from its consumers, the brand now offers stackable pieces, stay cool handles and universal lids and looks to additional expansion.

With the plethora of cookware companies in the industry, a brand needs a way to set itself apart. Made In wants to offer the home cook products that inspire and help them work on technique. Why ruin expensive food with ineffective cooking products? From foodies to food fans, the right cookware paired with the right techniques can make anyone a better cook.

 

Made In cookware, photo provided by Made In

 

Understanding that cookware needs to be productive, this brand is dedicated to teaching cooking techniques. Instead of just buying a pan or a pot, the company offers digital content that shows the cookware in action.

Live Feed kitchen essentials

Who hasn’t stared intently at cooking videos or food TV shows? While reading an old fashion recipe will always be important, the visual representation of the how, what and whys of cooking is just as important. Sometimes a single word cannot assist a newbie cook. But, showing that cook what a perfect pan sear looks like is extremely helpful.

Overall, this chef partnership as well as the Made In brand itself is looking to become more than just a company that sell pots and pans. Through a planned Austin based storefront, the company looks to position itself as a lifestyle brand. The idea is to show foodies, kitchen newbies and food fans how to incorporate recipes, cookware and even food trends into their own personal space.

While I haven’t personally used this brand of cookware, I am intrigued by the choice to incorporate cookware and cooking techniques. Pans, like knives, can be very personal to a chef. The angle of the handle, the heft of the pan and even the curve of the lip can make a difference to the cook. If this brand can explain why a particular pan might be beneficial for a specific recipe, it could assist many home cooks.

Although I have never been to culinary school, I have watched enough food TV shows and read enough cookbooks to know that some pans are essential for certain recipes. While my kitchen cabinets are stocked with all types of cookware, it can be overwhelming for the learning chef. If Made In can clearly explain the hows and whys in their videos, it could make consumers fans of their cookware.

Sometimes kitchen newbies look to a celebrity chef endorsement as part of their kitchen purchases. According to Chef Colicchio, he has “stocked my home kitchen with it, and will be outfitting my upcoming New York restaurant with Made In products as well.” This endorsement is more than just a name on a box. Such bold words could drive Top Chef fans to the brand in hopes of cooking like their favorite celebrity chef.

While a pan may not make you the next Tom Colicchio, the right kitchen essentials can assist in cooking confidence. It appears that this cookware Made In brand has an interesting angle to encourage both the aspiring chef and the foodie. Plus, at the current price point, this cookware is worth trying at least one offering to see how it works in your kitchen.

Have you heard of Made In cookware? Would the Tom Colicchio partnership/endorsement influence your next cookware purchase?

Category: Cookware Pans  Tags: ,  Comments off

Top Chef’s Tom Colicchio recommends Made In cookware

Can the right cookware make you a Top Chef? Tom Colicchio and Made In cookware believe that it is a brand that gets both the newbie chef and the foodie excited about cooking.

If you are a fan of Top Chef or a foodie, you know Chef Tom Colicchio. But, many foodies and home cooks may not be as familiar with Made In cookware. Recently, Chef Colicchio joined Made In cookware as an investor and advisor. Why did this cookware get Chef Colicchio’s stamp of approval?

Made In is a direct to consumer cookware company. The brand has focused on providing American-made stainless steel cookware at affordable prices. As the brand grew its following, the company has decided to expand beyond stainless steel. Based on real-time feedback from its consumers, the brand now offers stackable pieces, stay cool handles and universal lids and looks to additional expansion.

With the plethora of cookware companies in the industry, a brand needs a way to set itself apart. Made In wants to offer the home cook products that inspire and help them work on technique. Why ruin expensive food with ineffective cooking products? From foodies to food fans, the right cookware paired with the right techniques can make anyone a better cook.

 

Made In cookware, photo provided by Made In

 

Understanding that cookware needs to be productive, this brand is dedicated to teaching cooking techniques. Instead of just buying a pan or a pot, the company offers digital content that shows the cookware in action.

Live Feed kitchen essentials

Who hasn’t stared intently at cooking videos or food TV shows? While reading an old fashion recipe will always be important, the visual representation of the how, what and whys of cooking is just as important. Sometimes a single word cannot assist a newbie cook. But, showing that cook what a perfect pan sear looks like is extremely helpful.

Overall, this chef partnership as well as the Made In brand itself is looking to become more than just a company that sell pots and pans. Through a planned Austin based storefront, the company looks to position itself as a lifestyle brand. The idea is to show foodies, kitchen newbies and food fans how to incorporate recipes, cookware and even food trends into their own personal space.

While I haven’t personally used this brand of cookware, I am intrigued by the choice to incorporate cookware and cooking techniques. Pans, like knives, can be very personal to a chef. The angle of the handle, the heft of the pan and even the curve of the lip can make a difference to the cook. If this brand can explain why a particular pan might be beneficial for a specific recipe, it could assist many home cooks.

Although I have never been to culinary school, I have watched enough food TV shows and read enough cookbooks to know that some pans are essential for certain recipes. While my kitchen cabinets are stocked with all types of cookware, it can be overwhelming for the learning chef. If Made In can clearly explain the hows and whys in their videos, it could make consumers fans of their cookware.

Sometimes kitchen newbies look to a celebrity chef endorsement as part of their kitchen purchases. According to Chef Colicchio, he has “stocked my home kitchen with it, and will be outfitting my upcoming New York restaurant with Made In products as well.” This endorsement is more than just a name on a box. Such bold words could drive Top Chef fans to the brand in hopes of cooking like their favorite celebrity chef.

While a pan may not make you the next Tom Colicchio, the right kitchen essentials can assist in cooking confidence. It appears that this cookware Made In brand has an interesting angle to encourage both the aspiring chef and the foodie. Plus, at the current price point, this cookware is worth trying at least one offering to see how it works in your kitchen.

Have you heard of Made In cookware? Would the Tom Colicchio partnership/endorsement influence your next cookware purchase?

Category: Cookware Pans  Tags: ,  Comments off

The Secret to Happiness, From a French Kitchen

So in 1992, after business school in England and a stint working at Xerox, Ms. Gilbert returned home to France and the family business. She ran it with her brother until 2006, when she became sole proprietor. “When I took over, I opened the gates myself every morning at 4:30 a.m.,” she said. “I worked packing cookware in the factory when I wasn’t busy in my office. I didn’t want to run a hierarchical business.”

At the end of those very long days, Ms. Gilbert would head to the kitchen of her home in the seaside town of Saint-Pair-sur-Mer and make dinner for her family. “Cooking is how I relax,” she said. “And regularly using the pots, pans and casseroles we make gives me new ideas and keeps me focused on the goal of our business: to make the tools that help people cook better.” She recently welcomed us into that kitchen, where she discussed such passions as pepper and vintage clothing while whipping up a delicious roast tenderloin of pork.

The kitchen tools I can’t live without are: a stainless steel sauté pan and a cocotte [lidded metal casserole]. I’m obsessed by cooking with cocottes because I love the process of browning a roast—caramelizing the meat and then deglazing before slow braising in the same vessel. This method produces so much flavor, and the meat is always tender, too.

My cooking mentors were: my mother and my grandmother. They were remarkable cooks who made amazing foie gras and elegant dishes like warm oysters in Champagne sauce. From them I learned technique, but most of all how to taste food, to find the harmony in a dish, even a simple one. Cooking is sort of like writing music.

My pantry is always stocked with: crème fraîche, Maldon salt—I like its taste and the size of the flakes—eggs, pasta, Parmesan, bacon lardons and ham. Also pepper, butter and good olive oil, like the ones made by Alexis Muñoz in Spain. His oils are like silk. I love the one seasoned with lemon for seafood.

The ingredient I’m most excited about right now is: salted butter made from the raw milk of Froment du Léon cows, an ancient breed from the northern coast of Brittany. The cream from the milk is allowed to mature for a week before it’s churned, which makes for a bright-yellow butter with an amazing texture. You can find it at Terroirs d’Avenir in Paris. I’m also a pepper fiend, and my latest discovery is from South Africa—a pepper with a slightly smoky taste. It’s great on vegetables.

On weeknights, I typically cook: something fast, simple and delicious, like coquillettes [elbow macaroni] with chopped ham, crème fraîche, some good butter, salt, pepper and an egg yolk.

When I entertain, I like to: serve dishes cooked en cocotte, something like a pork loin roasted with onions and figs. I like bringing the copper casserole to the table and serving from it, too. It demystifies cooking by creating a link between the kitchen and the dining room.

A typical breakfast for me is: a coffee and a cigarette. I mean, I’m French, right? I also like a good ham or mushroom omelette.

A food trend I am totally over is: pretty food. I hate restaurants where the food comes to the table with little dribbles and dots all over the plate, and so many flowers you could make a nosegay for a doll. This décor is silly and adds nothing to the pleasure of eating. Well cooked food is beautiful all on its own, and I think modern food styling has gone overboard.

My approach to cooking is a lot like my approach to: life. Appreciate the simple things, and don’t make anything unnecessarily complicated. Take the time to do a job well, never lose your sense of humor, be generous, observant and adventurous. Most of all, never stop learning.

In addition to food, I’m obsessed with: gardens, especially white ones. Did you notice the white agapanthus outside? I love them. When I travel, I always try to find time to visit a favorite garden or discover a new one. I like the English style more than the French. I’m also a big vintage clothing collector, so I stalk several sites online in search of treasures like the Celine bag I recently found. I love the idea of giving a new life to something someone else has loved, and I believe that quality is the antidote to environmentally destructive consumerism.

When I get home from a trip abroad, I look forward to: good salted butter spread on a piece of really great bread. Life is made from little happinesses.

Valérie Gilbert’s Roast Pork Tenderloin

TOTAL TIME: 45 minutes SERVES: 4

3 tablespoons grapeseed or vegetable oil

1 (2-pound) rolled pork tenderloin

1 teaspoon coarse sea salt

½ teaspoon black pepper

2 small white onions, chopped

1 pound white button mushrooms, quartereds

3 cloves garlic, peeled and crushed

½ cup dry white wine

1 cup beef stock

6 sprigs fresh thyme

1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Season pork with salt and pepper. Heat oil in a heavy casserole over medium-high heat. Brown pork all over, then remove and set aside.

2. Add garlic, onions and mushrooms to casserole and sauté over medium-high heat until onions are transparent, 5-6 minutes. Add wine and reduce by half, about 5 minutes, scraping up brown bits on bottom of casserole. Add stock and thyme, and cook 3 minutes. Return pork to casserole, cover and bake in oven until a thermometer inserted in thickest part reads 150 degrees, 20 minutes.

3. Transfer roast to a cutting board and let rest 5 minutes. Slice pork against the grain. Serve pork with vegetables and juices from pan, plus rice, noodles or mashed potatoes.

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The Secret to Happiness, From a French Kitchen

UPENDING EXPECTATIONS appears to come naturally to Valérie Gilbert, president of Mauviel, the cookware company her family founded in Normandy in 1830. During her school days, “the nuns tried everything to turn me into a demure and obedient little girl who would grow up to do needlepoint, but it didn’t work,” Ms. Gilbert said. “This is what I decided I wanted to do when I was 12 years old. I’ve always been fascinated by the technical processes of metal working.”

So in 1992, after business school in England and a stint working…

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