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November 10, 2018 |

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The best dishes are white | Lifestyle | gazette.com

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Category: Dinnerware  Tags: ,  Comments off

Lodge 10.25" Cast-Iron Pre-Seasoned Skillet only $11.99 (55% off)!

The Lodge 10.25″ Pre-Seasoned Cast-Iron Skillet is only $11.99 (55% off) and the 8″ Lodge Skillet is only $9.90 with these deals at Amazon right now!

These pre-seasoned skillets can be used on the grill, stove and in the oven and are made in the USA.

Lodge 10.25″ Pre-Seasoned Cast-Iron Skillet Deal

The 10.25″ skillet is usually $26.68 and is on sale right now for for Amazon Prime members for only $11.99 at Amazon.com HERE!

If you are not a Prime member, you can get a FREE 30-day trial (which is perfect for the excellent Black Friday deals only valid for Prime members) at Amazon.com HERE.

Lodge 8″ Pre-Seasoned Cast-Iron Skillet Deal

The 8″ skillet is usually $18.00 and is on sale right now for $9.88 at Amazon.com HERE! The 8″ skillet sale is an add-on item and is available at the sale price if you have an order of $25 or more (the skillet counts as part of the $25 min. requirement). You do not have to be an Amazon Prime member to get this deal.

Amazon is offering free regular shipping to all Amazon customers in the U.S. with no minimum purchase for a limited time.

If you have Amazon Prime you will get 2-Day free shipping and access to special Prime-only deals. AND you can get a 30-Day FRE trial of Prime at Amazon.com HERE.

Keep in mind that Amazon sale prices change often so if you click on the link and the price is different than the one in the post, that means the deal has ended and is no longer available at that price.

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Smart Spending Resources is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.

Category: Skillets  Tags: ,  Comments off

Electric Skillets Market Outlook 2023: Market Trends, Segmentation …

Electric Skillets Market Research Report covers the present situation and the development prospects of Electric Skillets Industry for 2018-2023. Report covers the market scene and its development prospects over the coming years and exchange of the Leading Companies successful in this market. Electric Skillets Market, has been readied dependent on a top to bottom market investigation with contributions from industry specialists. To compute the market estimate, the report considers the income produced from the offers of Electric Skillets all inclusive.

Get Sample PDF of Electric Skillets Market report at https://www.pioneerreports.com/request-sample/388 

The Report Comprises of Various Company Profiles of Fundamental Market Players of Electric Skillets Market

With exhaustive market portion as far as various Countries, this report isolates the market into a couple of key nations, with deals (utilization), income, piece of the overall industry, and development rate of the market in these nations over the conjecture time frame 2018-2023.

For Any Query or Customized Report, Contact Our Expert at: https://www.pioneerreports.com/pre-order/388

 The Electric Skillets Market to grow at a substantial Compound Annual Growth Rate during the forecast period 2018-2023.

 Geographical Segmentation of Electric Skillets Market:

  • North America
  • Europe
  • Asia-Pacific (APAC)
  • Middle East and Africa
  • Rest of World (ROW)

The Report features key market elements of part. Different definitions and arrangement of the business, utilizations of the business and chain structure are given. The current market situation and future prospects of the division likewise have been examined. Furthermore, prime strategical exercises in the market, which incorporates item advancements, mergers and acquisitions, associations, and so on; are examined.

The examination report offers answers to a few vital inquiries identified with the development of the Electric Skillets market. At last, the possibility of new speculation ventures is surveyed, and by and large research ends are advertised. In a word, the report gives significant measurements on the condition of the business and is an important wellspring of direction and bearing for organizations and people intrigued by the market.

Ask for Sample of Electric Skillets market research report at: https://www.pioneerreports.com/request-sample/388

Major Table of Contents of Mentioned in the Report 2018-2023

  • Electric Skillets  Market Overview (2018 – 2023)
    • Product Overview and Scope
    • Market Segment by Type
    • Production Market Share
    • Electric Skillets  Consumption Market Share by Application
    • Market Size (Value) and Applications
    • Electric Skillets  Status and Outlook
    • Government Policies
  • Electric Skillets  Market Competition by Manufacturers (2018 – 2023)
    • Electric Skillets  Market by Capacity, Production and Share by Manufacturers
    • Revenue and Share by Manufacturers
    • Average Price by Manufacturers By Market
    • Manufacturers Manufacturing Base Distribution, Sales Area, Product Type
    • Market Competitive Situation and Trends
    • Market Concentration Rate
    • Electric Skillets  Market Share of Top 3 and Top 5 Manufacturers
  • Electric Skillets  Market Manufacturers Profiles/Analysis (2018 – 2023)
    • Company Name
    • Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base, Sales Area and Its Competitors
    • Electric Skillets  Market by Product Type, Application and Specification
    • Company A Electric Skillets  Capacity, Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin
    • Main Business/Business Overview
  • Electric Skillets  Market Capacity, Production, Revenue, Consumption, Export and Import (2018 – 2023)
    • Market Capacity, Production and Growth
    • Revenue and Growth of Market
    • Production, Consumption, Export and Import
  • Electric Skillets  Market Production, Revenue (Value), Price Trend by Type (2018 – 2023)
    • Electric Skillets  Market by Production and Market Share by Type
    • Revenue and Market Share by Type
    • Price by Type
    • Production Growth by Type
  • Electric Skillets  Market Analysis by Application (2018 – 2023)
    • Electric Skillets  Market Consumption and Market Share by Application
    • Consumption Growth Rate by Application
    • Market Drivers and Opportunities
    • Potential Application
    • Emerging Markets/Countries
  • Electric Skillets  Market Analysis by Regions (Provinces) (2018 – 2023)
    • Production Market, Production Value and Price by Regions (Provinces)
    • Production and Market Share by Regions (Provinces)
    • Production Value and Market Share by Regions (Provinces)
    • Sales Price by Regions (Provinces)
    • Consumption by Regions (Provinces)
    • Production, Consumption, Export and Import
  • Electric Skillets  Market Manufacturing Cost Analysis (2018 – 2023)
    • Electric Skillets  Market by Key Raw Materials Analysis
    • Key Raw Materials
    • Price Trend of Key Raw Materials
    • Key Suppliers of Raw Materials
    • Market Concentration Rate of Raw Materials
    • Proportion of Manufacturing Cost Structure
    • Raw Materials
    • Labor Cost
    • Manufacturing Expenses
    • Manufacturing Process Analysis of Electric Skillets
  • Industrial Chain, Sourcing Strategy and Downstream Buyers (2018 – 2023)
    • Industrial Chain Analysis
    • Upstream Raw Materials Sourcing
    • Raw Materials Sources of Electric Skillets  Market by Major Manufacturers
    • Downstream Buyers
  • Marketing Strategy Analysis, Distributors/Traders (2018 – 2023)
    • Electric Skillets  Marketing Channel
    • Direct Marketing
    • Indirect Marketing
    • Marketing Channel Development Trend
    • Market Positioning
    • Pricing Strategy
    • Brand Strategy
    • Target Client
    • Distributors/Traders List
  • Market Effect Factors Analysis (2018 – 2023)
    • Electric Skillets  Market by Technology Progress/Risk
    • Substitutes Threat
    • Technology Progress in Related Industry
    • Consumer Needs/Customer Preference Change
    • Economic/Political Environmental Change
  • Electric Skillets  Market Forecast (2018 – 2023)
    • Electric Skillets  Market by Capacity, Production, Revenue Forecast
    • Production, Import, Export and Consumption Forecast
    • Production Forecast by Type and Price Forecast
    • Consumption Forecast by Application
    • Electric Skillets  Market Production, Consumption, Import and Export Forecast by Regions (Provinces)
    • Production Forecast by Regions (Provinces)
    • Consumption Forecast by Regions (Provinces)
    • Production, Consumption, Import and Export Forecast by Regions (Provinces)

Get Full Report at $ 3000 (Single User License) at – https://www.pioneerreports.com/checkout/388

Category: Skillets  Tags: ,  Comments off

Jennifer O’Connell: When we don’t have any words, there’s food

I’ve been getting to know my grandmother. This is not as easy as it sounds, since she died when I was 20. I never knew her as an adult, and I’m not all that sure I knew her as a child either. She wasn’t the kind of grandmother who hauled you up on her lap and showered you with kisses. Unlike my other granny, she didn’t have a kitchen drawer full of chocolate, or any desire to learn to ride a skateboard. But she was entrepreneurial, fearless, witty and, I suspect, frustrated. She took books seriously, especially books featuring women who escaped the bonds of domesticity.

November is Food Month in The Irish Times, with food-related content in all our sections, plus reader events, competitions and exclusive content at irishtimes.com/foodmonth

I’m afraid I’d have lost her voice by now, forgotten her mirthful eyes, and her sharp wit, if it wasn’t for a battered book that sits on my kitchen shelf – her ancient copy of the novelist, broadcaster and cookery writer Maura Laverty’s iconic cookbook, Full and Plenty.

In the days of my grandmother and Maura Laverty, cookbooks were not the equivalent of scatter cushions for your kitchen, accessories designed to make your shelves look smart, while hinting you were the kind of person who might once have paid $27 for avocado toast overlooking Sydney Harbour. Recipes were not about tossing in a fistful of this or lashings of lovely jubbly that, but were precise, efficient, thrifty. Her generation didn’t suffer from the need to fetishise food the way ours does, or pretend that whipping up a crispy squid with mashed avo was easy-peasy. Maybe that’s where we’re going wrong, with our 15-minute recipes that take two hours and 37 pieces of equipment, and our rows of pristine, pastel-spined cookbooks.

We obsess about food: photographing it; watching other people eat it; queuing for doughnuts; reading about the latest place to find the best pizza. But we don’t spend much time cooking it, or even eating it. At the most recent count, I own more than 70 cookbooks, and for the last decade and a half I have produced meals from a repertoire of roughly five dishes.

My grandmother’s Maura Laverty is not an accessory. It’s a serious, hardworking cookbook, now held together with tailor’s elastic, the dust jacket curling at the edges like burnt toast. There are pages stuck together with flour, handwritten recipes, and little nuggets of advice on how to prune roses (never, ever after St Patrick’s day) or get boot polish out of carpet (carbon tetrachloride).

Newspaper clippings

Some of the oldest newspaper clippings are for beginners, like the ones for stew from the Daily Mirror “for the lady who claims she can’t boil water without burning it.” As my granny became more confident, her own recipes get more ambitious, the quantities larger, her notes in the margin more uncompromising. I can hear her, firmly admonishing Delia Smith for potato scones that turned out “a little bit flat”. I imagine vast, loud, family Sunday lunches of lamb and salmon with veg and creamy potatoes, and Victorian sponge for after.

Near the end, a sliver of paper with a handwritten recipe falls into my hand, and momentarily shatters my heart. “Pizza for 1 Person”, it says, in her careful script.

The gently scolding surveys that come out every year all say the same thing: that kind of cooking is almost gone. We’re relying more than ever on quick, heavily processed, hits of calories. To be fair, if you spend all day sautéing in an office, and then sweating on a long commute home to a messy house and tired children, not even Maura Laverty would chide you for not attempting to braise a housekeeper’s cut.

But still, we’re missing out. Food has always been about more than just fuel. Food, prepared by someone who loves you, is not just about nutrition or taste. When we don’t have any words, we turn to food. When someone is sick, we say ‘I’m thinking of you’ in a currency of tray bakes and desserts. When things are tense at home, my husband’s roast chicken with lemon and chorizo cuts straight through any silence. When I want to say to my children that I’m sorry for the long hours, and the perpetual distraction, I apologise with lasagne. Everyone thinks their mother’s apple tart or scones are the best in the world – and the truth is, they’re all right. (Except for my children, whose mother – to her shame – hasn’t made scones since 2011.)

Food is our most fundamental way of communicating, an endlessly rich lexicon of joy, apology, desire, memory, tradition, friendship and love. My grandmother wasn’t given to declarations of affection. But it’s there in the book I inherited, in the care with which she curated 50 years’ worth of recipes and life hacks.

Maura Laverty saw in cooking a poetry, and a kind of mindfulness – the “neurotic”, she writes, should try rubbing butter into flour for scones and feeling “the purity of flour, the cool velvety feel of it, the gentle, incessant calm-giving motion of the fingertips”. I’m going to give it a go this weekend – but I’ll start with my grandmother’s recipe instead. The key is to place the tray on an inverted Swiss roll tin on the second shelf, just so you know.

Category: Accessories  Tags: ,  Comments off

The best white dishes, according to tastemakers

West Elm’s textured dinnerware. 

Category: Dinnerware  Tags: ,  Comments off

Jennifer O’Connell: When we don’t have any words, there’s food

I’ve been getting to know my grandmother. This is not as easy as it sounds, since she died when I was 20. I never knew her as an adult, and I’m not all that sure I knew her as a child either. She wasn’t the kind of grandmother who hauled you up on her lap and showered you with kisses. Unlike my other granny, she didn’t have a kitchen drawer full of chocolate, or any desire to learn to ride a skateboard. But she was entrepreneurial, fearless, witty and, I suspect, frustrated. She took books seriously, especially books featuring women who escaped the bonds of domesticity.

November is Food Month in The Irish Times, with food-related content in all our sections, plus reader events, competitions and exclusive content at irishtimes.com/foodmonth

I’m afraid I’d have lost her voice by now, forgotten her mirthful eyes, and her sharp wit, if it wasn’t for a battered book that sits on my kitchen shelf – her ancient copy of the novelist, broadcaster and cookery writer Maura Laverty’s iconic cookbook, Full and Plenty.

In the days of my grandmother and Maura Laverty, cookbooks were not the equivalent of scatter cushions for your kitchen, accessories designed to make your shelves look smart, while hinting you were the kind of person who might once have paid $27 for avocado toast overlooking Sydney Harbour. Recipes were not about tossing in a fistful of this or lashings of lovely jubbly that, but were precise, efficient, thrifty. Her generation didn’t suffer from the need to fetishise food the way ours does, or pretend that whipping up a crispy squid with mashed avo was easy-peasy. Maybe that’s where we’re going wrong, with our 15-minute recipes that take two hours and 37 pieces of equipment, and our rows of pristine, pastel-spined cookbooks.

We obsess about food: photographing it; watching other people eat it; queuing for doughnuts; reading about the latest place to find the best pizza. But we don’t spend much time cooking it, or even eating it. At the most recent count, I own more than 70 cookbooks, and for the last decade and a half I have produced meals from a repertoire of roughly five dishes.

My grandmother’s Maura Laverty is not an accessory. It’s a serious, hardworking cookbook, now held together with tailor’s elastic, the dust jacket curling at the edges like burnt toast. There are pages stuck together with flour, handwritten recipes, and little nuggets of advice on how to prune roses (never, ever after St Patrick’s day) or get boot polish out of carpet (carbon tetrachloride).

Newspaper clippings

Some of the oldest newspaper clippings are for beginners, like the ones for stew from the Daily Mirror “for the lady who claims she can’t boil water without burning it.” As my granny became more confident, her own recipes get more ambitious, the quantities larger, her notes in the margin more uncompromising. I can hear her, firmly admonishing Delia Smith for potato scones that turned out “a little bit flat”. I imagine vast, loud, family Sunday lunches of lamb and salmon with veg and creamy potatoes, and Victorian sponge for after.

Near the end, a sliver of paper with a handwritten recipe falls into my hand, and momentarily shatters my heart. “Pizza for 1 Person”, it says, in her careful script.

The gently scolding surveys that come out every year all say the same thing: that kind of cooking is almost gone. We’re relying more than ever on quick, heavily processed, hits of calories. To be fair, if you spend all day sautéing in an office, and then sweating on a long commute home to a messy house and tired children, not even Maura Laverty would chide you for not attempting to braise a housekeeper’s cut.

But still, we’re missing out. Food has always been about more than just fuel. Food, prepared by someone who loves you, is not just about nutrition or taste. When we don’t have any words, we turn to food. When someone is sick, we say ‘I’m thinking of you’ in a currency of tray bakes and desserts. When things are tense at home, my husband’s roast chicken with lemon and chorizo cuts straight through any silence. When I want to say to my children that I’m sorry for the long hours, and the perpetual distraction, I apologise with lasagne. Everyone thinks their mother’s apple tart or scones are the best in the world – and the truth is, they’re all right. (Except for my children, whose mother – to her shame – hasn’t made scones since 2011.)

Food is our most fundamental way of communicating, an endlessly rich lexicon of joy, apology, desire, memory, tradition, friendship and love. My grandmother wasn’t given to declarations of affection. But it’s there in the book I inherited, in the care with which she curated 50 years’ worth of recipes and life hacks.

Maura Laverty saw in cooking a poetry, and a kind of mindfulness – the “neurotic”, she writes, should try rubbing butter into flour for scones and feeling “the purity of flour, the cool velvety feel of it, the gentle, incessant calm-giving motion of the fingertips”. I’m going to give it a go this weekend – but I’ll start with my grandmother’s recipe instead. The key is to place the tray on an inverted Swiss roll tin on the second shelf, just so you know.

Category: Accessories  Tags: ,  Comments off

11 meat and food gifts for the carnivore in your life – Business Insider

The Insider Picks team writes about stuff we think you’ll like. Business Insider has affiliate partnerships, so we get a share of the revenue from your purchase.


Porter Road

Some people like receiving fine jewelry as gifts, while others prefer to open the box to reveal cool tech accessories. For some — the ones who are always looking forward to their next meal, cooking up something delicious in the kitchen, or eyeing pictures of food hungrily — if it’s not something they can consume, what’s even the point?

Few types of food can make a person drool like meat. It’s often the protein that forms the foundation of a meal, or its addition immediately makes an unsatisfying dish more appealing.

Sending your friend or family member some meat as a gift is a little weird if it’s just the regular stuff from your local grocery store, but certainly not when it’s of the artisanal, gourmet, and curated variety. Packaged beautifully and combined with other cuts and kitchen accessories, it’s the perfect gift for the carnivore in your life.

Keep their bellies full and happy with these 11 gifts from online meat companies.

Looking for more gift ideas? Check out all of Insider Picks’ holiday gift guides for 2018 here.

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