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HomeGoods store opens at Legends Outlets

HomeGoods opened its new store today at The Legends Outlets in Kansas City, Kansas. The new store at 1817 Village West Parkway, on the northeast side of the shopping center, has 20,251 square feet. It is a division of TJX Companies, the parent company of TJ Maxx and Marshall’s. It carries furniture, lighting, rugs, kitchen, dining, decorative accessories, bedding, bath, kids’ décor and toys, outdoor living, pet accessories, storage, workspace and other items. Opening day hours are through 8 p.m. Regular store hours will be 9:30 a.m. to 9:30 p.m. Monday through Saturday and 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. Sunday. There are more than 650 HomeGoods stores across the country.

Category: Accessories  Tags: ,  Comments off

2018 KitchenAid Senior PGA Championship tee times & TV schedule

The 2018 KitchenAid Senior PGA Championship tees off this Thursday at Harbor Shores Golf Club in Benton Harbor, Michigan. 

Bernhard Langer is the defending champion, but unable to play this year as he attends his son’s high school graduation.

Rocco Mediate won the tournament when it was played at Harbor Shores in 2016. 

Here’s a look at the TV schedule and tee times for the most historic major in senior golf.

 

Round 1

HOLE 1

7:30 AM
Greg Turner
Gus Ulrich
Fran Quinn
7:40 AM
Tim Thelen
Stuart Smith
Mark Mouland
7:50 AM
Mardan Mamat
Kirk Stauffer
Christopher Williams
8:00 AM
Esteban Toledo
Mark Brown
Peter Fowler
8:10 AM
Frank Esposito Jr.
Paul Broadhurst
Joe Durant
8:20 AM
Mark Calcavecchia
Jerry Kelly
David Toms
8:30 AM
Jose Maria Olazabal
Mark O’Meara
Corey Pavin
8:40 AM
Paul Goydos
Jesper Parnevik
Kenny Perry
8:50 AM
Phillip Price
Darrell Kestner
Jeff Maggert
9:00 AM
Jay Haas
Billy Andrade
Gene Sauers
9:10 AM
Kevin Sutherland
Kirk Triplett
Bob Tway
9:20 AM
Glenn Joyner
Ricky Touma
Ken Tanigawa
9:30 AM
Jim Empey
Steen Tinning
Kent Jones
12:40 PM
Walt Chapman
Gary Hallberg
Prayad Marksaeng
12:50 PM
Jon Fiedler
Santiago Luna
Marco Dawson
1:00 PM
Chris Kaufman
Bob Gilder
Michael Bradley
1:10 PM
Joey Sindelar
Mark Tucker
Jongduck Kim
1:20 PM
Kevin Hayashi
Andre Bossert
Jay Don Blake
1:30 PM
Scott Simpson
Chris Starkjohann
Magnus Atlevi
1:40 PM
Tommy Armour III
Tom Byrum
Craig Stevens
1:50 PM
Scott Hoch
Peter Lonard
Bart Bryant
2:00 PM
Carlos Franco
Scott Dunlap
Kevin Johnson
2:10 PM
Shawn Kelly
Rob Wilkin
Andrew Oldcorn
2:20 PM
Rob Sedorcek
Paul Wesselingh
Dan Forsman
2:30 PM
Brian Cairns
Simon Brown
Mike Goodes
2:40 PM
Robert Thompson
Dick Mast
Jeff Coston

HOLE 10

7:30 AM
Duffy Waldorf
Gene Fieger
Len Mattiace
7:40 AM
Stephen Dodd
Mark Mielke
Steve Pate
7:50 AM
Tsuyishi Yoneyama
Dirk Schultz
Tommy Tolles
8:00 AM
Doug Garwood
Mike Genovese
Stephen Ames
8:10 AM
Kiyoshi Murota
Rick Morton
Scott Parel
8:20 AM
Tim Fleming
Scott Verplank
Tom Pernice
8:30 AM
John Jacobs
Mike Reid
Todd Hamilton
8:40 AM
Larry Mize
Tom Kite
Jerry Pate
8:50 AM
Paul Claxton
Philip Golding
Woody Austin
9:00 AM
Neal Lancaster
James Mason
Chris Johnson
9:10 AM
Jim Schuman
Billy Mayfair
John Harris
9:20 AM
Mike O’Toole
James Kingston
Jerry Smith
9:30 AM
Sam Randolph
Paul Eales
Lance Tenbroeck
12:40 PM
Timothy Petrovic
Roy Vucinich
Willie Wood
12:50 PM
David Mckenzie
Jim Estes
David Gilford
1:00 PM
Bill Glasson
Joe Boros
Bob Estes
1:10 PM
Wesley Short Jr.
Barry Lane
Fred Funk
1:20 PM
Mark Brooks
Olin Browne
Peter Baker
1:30 PM
Rocco Mediate
Colin Montgomerie
Vijay Singh
1:40 PM
Scott McCarron
Miguel Angel Jimenez
Steve Flesch
1:50 PM
Tom Lehman
Jeff Sluman
Sandy Lyle
2:00 PM
Lee Janzen
Peter Jacobsen
Miguel Martin
2:10 PM
John Huston
David Frost
Brendan McGovern
2:20 PM
Jarmo Sandelin
Brad Lardon
Russ Cochran
2:30 PM
John Nieporte
Glen Day
Clark Dennis
2:40 PM
Sonny Skinner
PH Horgan
Jeff Brehaut

Round 2

HOLE 1

7:30 AM
Timothy Petrovic
Roy Vucinich
Willie Wood
7:40 AM
David Mckenzie
Jim Estes
David Gilford
7:50 AM
Bill Glasson
Joe Boros
Bob Estes
8:00 AM
Wesley Short Jr.
Barry Lane
Fred Funk
8:10 AM
Mark Brooks
Olin Browne
Peter Baker
8:20 AM
Rocco Mediate
Colin Montgomerie
Vijay Singh
8:30 AM
Scott McCarron
Miguel Angel Jimenez
Steve Flesch
8:40 AM
Tom Lehman
Jeff Sluman
Sandy Lyle
8:50 AM
Lee Janzen
Peter Jacobsen
Miguel Martin
9:00 AM
John Huston
David Frost
Brendan McGovern
9:10 AM
Jarmo Sandelin
Brad Lardon
Russ Cochran
9:20 AM
John Nieporte
Glen Day
Clark Dennis
9:30 AM
Sonny Skinner
PH Horgan
Jeff Brehaut
12:40 PM
Duffy Waldorf
Gene Fieger
Len Mattiace
12:50 PM
Stephen Dodd
Mark Mielke
Steve Pate
1:00 PM
Tsuyishi Yoneyama
Dirk Schultz
Tommy Tolles
1:10 PM
Doug Garwood
Mike Genovese
Stephen Ames
1:20 PM
Kiyoshi Murota
Rick Morton
Scott Parel
1:30 PM
Tim Fleming
Scott Verplank
Tom Pernice
1:40 PM
John Jacobs
Mike Reid
Todd Hamilton
1:50 PM
Larry Mize
Tom Kite
Jerry Pate
2:00 PM
Paul Claxton
Philip Golding
Woody Austin
2:10 PM
Neal Lancaster
James Mason
Chris Johnson
2:20 PM
Jim Schuman
Billy Mayfair
John Harris
2:30 PM
Mike O’Toole
James Kingston
Jerry Smith

HOLE 10

7:30 AM
Walt Chapman
Gary Hallberg
Prayad Marksaeng
7:40 AM
Jon Fiedler
Santiago Luna
Marco Dawson
7:50 AM
Chris Kaufman
Bob Gilder
Michael Bradley
8:00 AM
Joey Sindelar
Mark Tucker
Jongduck Kim
8:10 AM
Kevin Hayashi
Andre Bossert
Jay Don Blake
8:20 AM
Scott Simpson
Chris Starkjohann
Magnus Atlevi
8:30 AM
Tommy Armour III
Tom Byrum
Craig Stevens
8:40 AM
Scott Hoch
Peter Lonard
Bart Bryant
8:50 AM
Carlos Franco
Scott Dunlap
Kevin Johnson
9:00 AM
Shawn Kelly
Rob Wilkin
Andrew Oldcorn
9:10 AM
Rob Sedorcek
Paul Wesselingh
Dan Forsman
9:20 AM
Brian Cairns
Simon Brown
Mike Goodes
9:30 AM
Robert Thompson
Dick Mast
Jeff Coston
12:40 PM
Greg Turner
Gus Ulrich
Fran Quinn
12:50 PM
Tim Thelen
Stuart Smith
Mark Mouland
1:00 PM
Mardan Mamat
Kirk Stauffer
Christopher Williams
1:10 PM
Esteban Toledo
Mark Brown
Peter Fowler
1:20 PM
Frank Esposito Jr.
Paul Broadhurst
Joe Durant
1:30 PM
Mark Calcavecchia
Jerry Kelly
David Toms
1:40 PM
Jose Maria Olazabal
Mark O’Meara
Corey Pavin
1:50 PM
Paul Goydos
Jesper Parnevik
Kenny Perry
2:00 PM
Phillip Price
Darrell Kestner
Jeff Maggert
2:10 PM
Jay Haas
Billy Andrade
Gene Sauers
2:20 PM
Kevin Sutherland
Kirk Triplett
Bob Tway
2:30 PM
Glenn Joyner
Ricky Touma
Ken Tanigawa
2:40 PM
Jim Empey
Steen Tinning
Kent Jones

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Antiques and Collecting: Edison lamp shed light on phonographs

Phonographs were invented in 1877.

The early versions had one needle for recording and another needle for playing.

The music was recorded on tinfoil-coated cylinders using a needle to make tiny lines that, when played with the other needle, made sounds.

Thomas Edison, the inventor, founded his own company to make phonographs. He also invented movies, the light bulb and many other things, but failed to create a cement that could be used to make a case for the phonograph.

His phonograph company was successful for a while, and he even designed a combination phonograph-lamp in about 1920. The lamp was made to be kept on a table in the living room so the whole family could listen.

Many versions were made in the popular styles of the day. A design called a Phonolamp was made about 1920. It had an electric motor, metal case and an embroidered lampshade. These combination lamps soon went out of style but are treasured by phonograph collectors. A rare, working Phonolamp recently was sold in a German auction for $1,967.

Q: I have a print by Maude Goodman and I’m wondering about its age and value.

A: Maude Goodman (1860-1938) was born in Manchester, England, and moved to London. She did sentimental paintings of women and children in Victorian settings. Her work was relatively unknown until the 1880s.

Several of her paintings were exhibited in the Royal Academy of Arts in London in the late 1800s. Artwork has to be seen by an expert to determine the value. An original lithograph of one of her works sold at auction for $177, but many online sites sell reproductions of original works of art for $10 or less.

Q: I have a set of dishes marked “Stetson China Rio.” The dinner plates all have the stamped mark, but the platters, bowls and cups and saucer are not marked. Are these knockoffs?

A: Stetson started as a decorating and distributing company in 1919 in Illinois.

By 1946, Stetson China Co. was making ceramic and Melmac (plastic) dinnerware. The company closed in 1966. Pieces often were not marked. The word “Rio” is the shape name.

Your set probably was made about 1950. Many patterns were hand-painted on this shape. Stetson dinner plates sell for about $20 from matching services.

CURRENT PRICES

Current prices are recorded from antiques shows, flea markets, sales and auctions throughout the United States. Prices vary in different locations because of local economic conditions.

• Vase: pottery, flared collar, white-and-blue glaze, lizard handles, pink eyes, circa 1882; 11¼ inches; $370

• Bowl: center, gilt, enamel, military scenes, putto and dolphin supports, Sevres style, porcelain, 22 1/2 x 15 inches, $375.

• Game table: Louis XV, cherry, inlay, green, cabriole legs, hoof feet; 28½ by 32½ inches; $400

• Window: leaded, slag glass, red-and-white flowers, urn, lavender border, frame; 22¾ by 22¾ inches; pair, $500

• De Vez cracker jar: tricolor, peach to aqua, Venetian boaters, sailors, city, columns; 7 by 4¼ inches; $1,405

• Jade fan: pierced, two battling dragons, scrolled handle, Lu symbol, bats, clouds; 12½ inches; $2,000

• Bowl: glass liner, writhing dragon, clutching flaming pearl, hammered, silver, Japan, circa 1900; 8 inches; $2,125

Terry and Kim Kovel, authorities on collectibles, write for the King Features Syndicate. Visit www.kovels.com.

Category: Dinnerware  Tags: ,  Comments off

Outdoor entertaining with indoor style

Hosting an outdoor party on the balcony or in the backyard has often involved a run to the big-box store for utilitarian paper goods and plastic plates, and setting the table with a mishmash of random bowls and tea lights.

But this summer there’s a range of decor and serveware with the more sophisticated look and feel of indoor-quality goods — part of a growing trend toward blurring indoor/outdoor decor lines.

“Outdoor spaces should really be thought of as an extension of your living room, and that definitely applies to entertaining,” says Kara Smith of SFA Design, a bicoastal luxury design firm. “The furnishings should be as approachable as the interior, so that guests feel comfortable.”

A look at some of what designers and retailers are offering:

Article.com has a teak and powder-coated-steel dining table with midcentury modern/industrial style that could live indoors as well as out. The Bali pendant light looks like rattan, but is really hardy, woven synthetic fiber; a weatherproof rubber insulates the power cord.


+3 

This undated photo provided by Anthropologie shows a rattan bar cart with French bistro style elements, which adds flair to the backyard or city terrace outdoor space.


Debi Treloar, Anthropologie via AP

Anthropologie’s new outdoor collection includes a woven, natural, blue-and-white rattan bar cart, table and chairs that evoke a chic French outdoor café. Here too, British designer Tracey Boyd’s Twill and Atlas ceramic side tables, with interesting geometric patterns.

Digital printing and improved materials and manufacturing are giving us wonderful new indoor/outdoor rugs that are a far cry from the slippy, cheap-looking plastic mats of a few years back.


+3 

This undated photo provided by Frontgate shows a rug that looks like a slice of agate and is an unexpected and interesting option that can be used both outdoors and in. 


Frontgate via AP

Frontgate has the hip, geometric color-block Halia rug that’s colorfast and stain-resistant. Yet the hand-tufted, looped pile makes for a soft, plush feeling underfoot. Also here, a sea green and blue abstract design rug inspired by a slice of agate. Extending the mineral theme: a Palm Springs-style dining table crafted of Brazilian blue quartz on a sleek steel base. Or evoke the British West Indies with the Montserrat dining chair, inspired by traditional wing chairs but built of cast aluminum and outdoor-worthy woven materials and finishes.

One of the biggest trends in outdoor decor, and a boon to al fresco home entertaining, is deep, comfortable seating. We’re seeing roomy sofas and chairs with all the style and finish chops of indoor furniture.

RH Modern has the Balmain collection, designed by Australian brothers Harrison and Nicholas Condos. Inspired by the lines of the Sydney Harbour Bridge, the modern, minimalist pieces include sofas, swivel chairs and ottomans, with either teak or aluminum frames, and can be custom-covered in hundreds of performance-grade fabrics.

Another chic option at RH Modern: the Positano chair. Milan-based Toan Nguyen created a contemporary twist on basket-weave with an oversize, woven teak frame that makes a comfy lounger for an entertaining-oriented outdoor space.


+3 

This undated photo provided by Article shows the Bali pendant light fixture. The fixture looks like rattan but is actually woven of weather-resistant poly material. Available in black or white in a couple of sizes, it’s a stylish lighting option for an outdoor patio or terrace. 


Article via AP

Anchoring the outdoor entertainment zone with furniture and a rug is important, but don’t forget lighting.

Lamps Plus has a chandelier with a weathered-zinc finish and a trio of seeded-glass shades for a soft illumination.

At Uttermost, find a collection of hand-carved slate and hammered copper indoor/outdoor table lamps by designer Carolyn Kinder of St. Petersburg, Florida.


+3 

This undated photo shows Merritt’s melamine dinnerware which combines design elements of fine tableware with weather resistance, making it a good option for those looking to enhance their outdoor entertaining game using goods with a more elevated style and substance. A realistic marble pattern reflects the current trend in tabletop accessories toward stoneware. 


Dennis Skinner, Merritt via AP

Tableware is another area where manufacturing advancements have led to higher quality outdoor products.

Los Angeles-based Merritt has a collection of marble-printed dinnerware that closely resembles the real thing, with heft and pattern depth we haven’t associated with melamine before. A botanical print edged with a bamboo motif has the look and feel of fine china.

World Market has acrylic highball glasses that look like cut crystal, and there are elegant champagne and wine glasses here too.

“One of the best parts of summer is the chance to do some outdoor entertaining,” says Todd Childs, assistant homes editor at Southern Living magazine. “Give your dining room the summer off. Invite some friends over and take the fun outside.”

Category: Dinnerware  Tags: ,  Comments off

Outdoor entertaining with indoor style

Hosting an outdoor party on the balcony or in the backyard has often involved a run to the big-box store for utilitarian paper goods and plastic plates, and setting the table with a mishmash of random bowls and tea lights.

But this summer there’s a range of decor and serveware with the more sophisticated look and feel of indoor-quality goods — part of a growing trend toward blurring indoor/outdoor decor lines.

“Outdoor spaces should really be thought of as an extension of your living room, and that definitely applies to entertaining,” says Kara Smith of SFA Design, a bicoastal luxury design firm. “The furnishings should be as approachable as the interior, so that guests feel comfortable.”

A look at some of what designers and retailers are offering:

Article.com has a teak and powder-coated-steel dining table with midcentury modern/industrial style that could live indoors as well as out. The Bali pendant light looks like rattan, but is really hardy, woven synthetic fiber; a weatherproof rubber insulates the power cord.


+3 

This undated photo provided by Anthropologie shows a rattan bar cart with French bistro style elements, which adds flair to the backyard or city terrace outdoor space.


Debi Treloar, Anthropologie via AP

Anthropologie’s new outdoor collection includes a woven, natural, blue-and-white rattan bar cart, table and chairs that evoke a chic French outdoor café. Here too, British designer Tracey Boyd’s Twill and Atlas ceramic side tables, with interesting geometric patterns.

Digital printing and improved materials and manufacturing are giving us wonderful new indoor/outdoor rugs that are a far cry from the slippy, cheap-looking plastic mats of a few years back.


+3 

This undated photo provided by Frontgate shows a rug that looks like a slice of agate and is an unexpected and interesting option that can be used both outdoors and in. 


Frontgate via AP

Frontgate has the hip, geometric color-block Halia rug that’s colorfast and stain-resistant. Yet the hand-tufted, looped pile makes for a soft, plush feeling underfoot. Also here, a sea green and blue abstract design rug inspired by a slice of agate. Extending the mineral theme: a Palm Springs-style dining table crafted of Brazilian blue quartz on a sleek steel base. Or evoke the British West Indies with the Montserrat dining chair, inspired by traditional wing chairs but built of cast aluminum and outdoor-worthy woven materials and finishes.

One of the biggest trends in outdoor decor, and a boon to al fresco home entertaining, is deep, comfortable seating. We’re seeing roomy sofas and chairs with all the style and finish chops of indoor furniture.

RH Modern has the Balmain collection, designed by Australian brothers Harrison and Nicholas Condos. Inspired by the lines of the Sydney Harbour Bridge, the modern, minimalist pieces include sofas, swivel chairs and ottomans, with either teak or aluminum frames, and can be custom-covered in hundreds of performance-grade fabrics.

Another chic option at RH Modern: the Positano chair. Milan-based Toan Nguyen created a contemporary twist on basket-weave with an oversize, woven teak frame that makes a comfy lounger for an entertaining-oriented outdoor space.


+3 

This undated photo provided by Article shows the Bali pendant light fixture. The fixture looks like rattan but is actually woven of weather-resistant poly material. Available in black or white in a couple of sizes, it’s a stylish lighting option for an outdoor patio or terrace. 


Article via AP

Anchoring the outdoor entertainment zone with furniture and a rug is important, but don’t forget lighting.

Lamps Plus has a chandelier with a weathered-zinc finish and a trio of seeded-glass shades for a soft illumination.

At Uttermost, find a collection of hand-carved slate and hammered copper indoor/outdoor table lamps by designer Carolyn Kinder of St. Petersburg, Florida.


+3 

This undated photo shows Merritt’s melamine dinnerware which combines design elements of fine tableware with weather resistance, making it a good option for those looking to enhance their outdoor entertaining game using goods with a more elevated style and substance. A realistic marble pattern reflects the current trend in tabletop accessories toward stoneware. 


Dennis Skinner, Merritt via AP

Tableware is another area where manufacturing advancements have led to higher quality outdoor products.

Los Angeles-based Merritt has a collection of marble-printed dinnerware that closely resembles the real thing, with heft and pattern depth we haven’t associated with melamine before. A botanical print edged with a bamboo motif has the look and feel of fine china.

World Market has acrylic highball glasses that look like cut crystal, and there are elegant champagne and wine glasses here too.

“One of the best parts of summer is the chance to do some outdoor entertaining,” says Todd Childs, assistant homes editor at Southern Living magazine. “Give your dining room the summer off. Invite some friends over and take the fun outside.”

Category: Dinnerware  Tags: ,  Comments off

Louisville eatery’s emphasis on biscuits pays off: review

Biscuit Bar

Food: Three stars

Service: Three stars

Ambience: Two and a half stars

Price: $-$$

Address: 579 East South Boulder Road, Louisville

Contact: 720-890-8025, biscuitbarlouisville.com

Hours: 7-noon Monday-Sunday

Noise level: Low, with a classic county soundtrack playing discreetly in the background, which is probably the absolute best music to eat biscuits and gravy by.

Biscuits, and its culinary partner in crime, gravy, were initially born out of economic necessity, but now enjoy a reputation as soothing Southern-inspired comfort food. American biscuits, which generally do not require yeast for rising, are inexpensive and easy to prepare. The venerable gravy accompaniment requires nothing more than fat, milk and flour, although fancier interpretations may include a relatively luxurious smattering of crumbled sausage. But despite the humble origins of biscuits and gravy, they’re darn hard to beat for a satisfying breakfast, no matter what the size of your wallet is.

One local site that spotlights this comforting specialty is Louisville’s aptly named Biscuit Bar. A spinoff of its next-door neighbor, Mudrock’s Tap and Tavern, this venue showcases its namesake in nearly all of its menu items.

On a recent weekday morning visit, the Biscuit Bar exuded a pleasantly low-key vibe and service to match. Warm dark tones and the physical layout give this restaurant the appearance of a hospitable and down-to-earth bar. It’s the kind of place where you wouldn’t be surprised to see someone quietly tallying up the previous night’s tavern receipts like something out of a Sam Elliot movie.

Getting back to the food, minimalists can enjoy the scratch-made buttermilk biscuit offering with nothing more than a spread of jam or butter. Biscuit breakfast sandwiches, with egg, cheese and a choice of ham, sausage, bacon, or no meat at all, are also on tap, as is a Monte Cristo variation. There’s also a veggie number featuring portobello mushroom, spinach, tomato and Swiss cheese, but meat lovers can also opt for ones showcasing fried chicken or pulled pork, among other choices. Last but not least, there’s a selection of biscuit-based skillet breakfasts that are hearty enough to prepare one for a Bunyanesque day’s work complete with giant blue ox.

Given the straightforward fare, one would expect that the coffee offerings here might be nothing more than your basic food service cup of joe. That would have been fine, but Biscuit Bar takes its game to the next level by cold brewing beans from Oskar Blues’ Hotbox Roasters. This coffee is also available hot, and the cold brew process makes for superior flavor at any temperature. A $4 hot coffee combines hot water and cold brew to make a top notch Americano-style drink, and a $4.25 latte was smoother and more nuanced than what you’d get at a coffee chains.

My two breakfast companions and I were a hungry lot, and we all opted for one of the generously portioned skillets. One of my friends went for an old standby of an $8.99 biscuits and sausage gravy plate with two eggs and home fries. The spuds were nicely crisp and the sunny side up eggs were properly prepared, neither too runny or too hard. The only quibble was that the sausage gravy could have done with less salt, but in every other respect, it outshined most of its peers. More often than not, I’ve noticed that some biscuit gravies have a slightly off, somewhat processed taste, and this eatery’s version did not, making for an appealingly clean homespun flavor.

For $10.49, I enjoyed a course identical to the above biscuits and gravy selection, albeit with the addition of two strips of boneless fried chicken. Featuring lively but not overwhelming seasoning, moist and tender white meat poultry and a proper crisp exterior, this bird was a worthwhile addition for those with more voracious appetites. The biscuit was also top notch through and through. Some biscuits may possess compelling crispness and crumb on the outside, but suffer from a soggy interior. Biscuit Bar’s take possessed desirable exterior qualities as well as a fine center with just the right measure of moisture and lightness.

Last but not least, another friend, who’s actually quite a sober person, opted for the $9.99 Hangover Helper Skillet. This restorative breakfast was something of an everything but the kitchen sink choice, including eggs, bacon, cheese, onions and tomato over breakfast potatoes and a biscuit. What really made this choice stand out was the addition of Mudrock’s green chile, which struck an optimum balance between heat, meatiness and well-rounded flavor.

While there’s a few items that don’t feature this eatery’s namesake product, Biscuit Bar successfully commits to showcasing the humble biscuit in numerous satisfying choices at a fair price. The mellow vibe enhances the overall experience, and it’s definitely a worthwhile destination for the textbook American breakfast enthusiast.

Category: Skillets  Tags: ,  Comments off

Championship week schedule

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Category: Kitchenaid  Tags: ,  Comments off