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Cuisinart Cast Iron Deal | The Daily Caller

Today only, Cuisinart cast iron cookware is on sale. Specifically, the deal includes three different items, each available in both light blue and cream colored.

Personally, I think the fact that they are 70 percent off is enough of a selling point, but the marketing folks went a different route, deciding to compare cast iron to Fight Club. Here’s their pitch:

The first rule of Cast Iron Cookware is the exact opposite of the first rule of Fight Club. You have to talk about how much your love it. You have to blog about it, tweet about it, Instagram it, and film yourself cooking with it. How else do you expect people to know how great you are at cooking with cast iron?

Below are the three different pieces of cookware available in their light blue form. Remember, they are also available in cream.

Normally $250, this cast iron fryer is 72 percent off today (Photo via Amazon)

Cuisinart 12″ Chicken Fryer Cast Iron, Light Blue on sale for $69.99

Normally $250, this cast iron pot is 72 percent off today (Photo via Amazon)

Cuisinart Casserole Cast Iron, Light Blue, 7-Quart on sale for $69.99

Normally $180, this cast iron pot is 69 percent off today (Photo via Amazon)

Cuisinart 5.5 Qt. Casserole Cast Iron, Light Blue on sale for $54.99

Cast iron pots and pans provide superior heat retention and even heat distribution, and the porcelain interior is ideal for cooking.

Cast Iron Cookware from Cuisinart — 70 percent off

Cuisinart cast iron (Amazon Video screenshot)

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Ask The Advocate: Yuck! Can I still use it after the flood? Apology from BRAF on parking garage

Is it safe to use a solid wood table that was inundated in the August 2016 flood? I have heard people say that because the wood is porous it will always be subject to being a site for mold growth. I have also heard a similar statement regarding cast iron skillets and pots that were inundated in the flood. I believe there are ways to restore these items.

We checked with Claudette Hanks Reichel, a professor and housing specialist with the LSU Agricultural Center and director of the LaHouse Resource Center.

Reichel says, “Mold does not penetrate solid wood but grows only on the surface, and only if there is enough moisture to support growth. Any visible mold should be cleaned off (outdoors) with a nonphosphate cleaner, then dry it quickly and thoroughly, but not in direct sunlight. Flooded furniture may need to be stripped and refinished if the finish remains cloudy or is damaged.

“All flooded cookware should be disinfected as a precaution against bacteria and other pathogens in floodwater — although they are surely dead by now if the cookware has been dry for a long time. Don’t use bleach solutions on metals since it can be corrosive. Instead, disinfect metal cookware by boiling in water for 10 minutes.

“Iron cookware does have some surface pores and is prone to rust but can be restored and used. It should be washed using a stiff brush and scouring powder, then scoured with steel wool, to remove rust and any residue, then washed with dish detergent and rinsed in hot water. Once clean, season the iron cookware: Warm the pans for 15 minutes in a 200 degree oven, remove from oven and rub in (with paper towels) a generous amount of flaxseed oil, place upside down in a cold oven and heat it at 250 degrees for 2-3 hours. Flaxseed oil provides a more durable seasoning than other edible oils.”

Apology on BRAF parking garage

On July 4, the Baton Rouge Area Foundation-owned parking garage at Third and Convention streets was packed with the vehicles for the riverfront fireworks. But the fun turned to frustration when these visitors, some with small children, were effectively held captive in the fume-filled garage for upward to an hour and a half.

For years, parking fees were collected by an attendant who activated the exit gates upon payment. But when BRAF took over, it replaced the attendant with an ATM-type machine, which accepts credit cards but no cash. Surely management should have foreseen the need for one or two attendants on such a night. Or could have collected a set fee upon entry so there would be clear sailing on exit.

“First, we apologize for what happened and have instituted a new system to improve how the garage works,” says Mukul Verma, director of communications for BRAF.

“On that day, our employee rushed away to assist in an emergency situation where someone had suffered a stroke at one of our nearby properties. So when one motorist couldn’t exit the garage, there was no one to open the gate, causing a backup.

“Commercial Properties Realty Trust, which manages the Foundation’s real estate assets, will improve operations when there is a large demand on the garage from downtown events.

“Again, we apologize for the inconvenience and pledge to do better next time.”

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The Battle for Venezuela, Through a Lens, Helmet and Gas Mask

“Now, I have no fear, because I already lost the fear I had, and the respect for the military,” he said.

“The real soldiers of Venezuela wear rags on their faces,” he said. “They don’t use grenades — they use stones.”

Many Resistencia members wear T-shirts resembling the uniform of Simón Bolívar, who led the rebellion for Venezuela’s independence from Spain. They sometimes plead with soldiers to join them, quoting Bolívar: “When tyranny makes law, rebellion is a right.”

Wuilly Arteaga, 23, a violinist who became a symbolic figure in the protests for playing the national anthem at the front lines, cried when the police broke his violin. Videos of Mr. Arteaga in tears went viral. He was flown to the United States, where two prominent musicians, Marc Anthony and Oscarcito, gave him a new violin.

Mr. Arteaga was injured on Saturday in violent clashes between security forces and protesters at a march on the Supreme Court in support of alternative magistrates appointed Friday by the opposition. “Neither rubber bullets nor pellets will stop our fight for Venezuela’s independence,” Mr. Arteaga posted later on Twitter. “Tomorrow I will be back in the streets.”

After an earlier day of clashes, hundreds of soldiers retreated, their ammunition exhausted. Members of La Resistencia celebrated as they retook the main highway, raising their fists and singing the national anthem.

“Glory to the brave people, who shook off the yoke,” they sang. “Off with the chains! Off with the chains!” the song continues. “Death to oppression!”

Continue reading the main story

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Market serves up a new stall

Libby Gliksman has teamed up with her parents Yossi and Lorraine Gliksman, who run cookware paradise Upstairs Downstairs in Oswestry, to launch the Market Cookshop.

Upstairs Downstairs, a popular destination for gourmands across the Midlands and Wales, was established in 1987 and was winner of the ‘Britain’s Best Cookshop’ award in 2013.

“The Market Cookshop is a mini version of Upstairs Downstairs, selling quality cookware ranging from French casserole dishes, pots and pans to handcrafted products, glassware, wood-fired outdoor ovens and nifty kitchen gadgets,” said Libby.

“Both my parents are really amazing cooks and I’ve grown up surrounded by cookware and wonderful food all my life. I’ve learned from them and developed my own knowledge about food and cooking.

“I’m proud of what my parents have achieved and I wanted to bring a touch of Upstairs Downstairs to Shrewsbury.

“Cooking should be fun, experimental and enjoyable. If you have the right cookware and useful kitchen gadgets, it’s so much easier and very therapeutic. I’m hoping to be able to introduce cooking demonstrations into the Market Hall in the future.

“I love the Market Hall. It’s a special place with a real community spirit. I adore being here. I very much believe in the mantra of live local, shop local and eat local. With all the wonderful fresh produce, herbs and spices available in the market I thought it would be perfect to sell the quality pans and kitchen accessories with which to cook them.”

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When Lina Hu interviewed for a dishwashing job, she got a $40 million idea

Lina Hu, 52, is chairman and chief executive of Clipper Corp., which supplies uniforms and other goods to companies in the retail, hospitality, delivery and food service industries.

“We provide product to restaurants, including fry baskets, steak knives, serving trays, flatware,” Hu said. “Pots, pans, anything you cannot eat. We also provide high-end stainless steel cookware and utensils to retail. We are a full-service uniform provider, from design to manufacture to distribution.”

Clipper, founded in 1994 and based outside Los Angeles, projects revenue this year of about $40 million. Clients include Burger King Corp., Target Corp., Home Depot Inc. and FedEx Corp.

The brainstorm: In the early ’90s, after failing to land a customer service job with ATT in Boston, Hu moved to Los Angeles to be near friends. She was reduced to the hope of becoming a dishwasher in a restaurant. “When life puts you in a difficult position, you will be amazed at how well you can survive,” Hu said. That job interview gave her an idea.

“I saw the opportunity, while they interviewed me. They showed me the dishes, what products to wash. I saw all of the pots and pans, silverware, plateware. I thought ‘China has a lot of factories. They can make these things cheaper, and I can supply it for them.’”

Ignore failure: People assumed she would fail, Hu recalled. “One, you don’t speak English. Two, you don’t have any merchandise, you just have an idea. Third, you’re Asian, and they don’t respect you,” Hu said.

“For me, I don’t give up. I called all of the other national chain restaurants. I said, ‘I can supply you with the same quality, but at reduced costs.’ Or, ‘You will spend the same amount of money, but have a better product to use.’ Most wouldn’t even return my calls.”

The breakthrough: “Finally, Burger King gave me my first appointment, and I closed the deal. They were having their baseball caps made in South America, but they became my first customer.”

“I went back to China, found a factory that wanted the work,” Hu said. “They asked me to pay them. I told them, ‘I don’t have money. I’m your free salesman. You should pay me for this. You make the product. I will find the buyer.’ I took my cut from Burger King and paid the factory.”

China roots: Hu’s engineer father and factory-worker mother encouraged her to have lofty goals, but “in China then, people did not have many options. It wasn’t what you wanted to choose to do; it was whatever was available.” Hu earned a bachelor’s degree in statistics and a master’s degree in business from Zhejiang University, south of Shanghai. “There were really no women role models in China, but I always had a dream of starting my own company,” Hu said.

“My father was very positive,” Hu said. “He always encouraged me to think and dream big, He always said, ‘Never let anyone stand in your way.’ To him, what I did was like a dream come true, being an entrepreneur. He was so proud of me.”

Branching out: Hu’s next two customers were Darden Restaurants, owner of eight casual dining restaurant chains, including Olive Garden and LongHorn Steakhouse. Her third customer was Yum Brands, operator of KFC, Taco Bell and Pizza Hut.

Hu refined her pitch. “I’d bring samples to show them what the product looked like. We will be reliable and accountable. It will be hands free for them.”

Today, Clipper employs 80 people in the LA area and Atlanta. The Chinese factories that work with Clipper employ more than 500.

The Clipper name: Hu named her company after the revolutionary 19th century sailing vessels. The sleek clipper ships had more sail space than any predecessor, which allowed them to set speed records.

“It represents my style,” Hu said. “No matter what obstacles, we always move forward, reach our destination and deliver on what we promised.”

Leadership style: “I can be a hands-on manager at times, but I do instill a workplace environment where the employees are encouraged to own their work,” Hu said, adding that she doesn’t want her workers to fear missteps. “They know they won’t be fired if they make a mistake. Just learn from it.

“You have to hire talented people,” Hu said. “That includes people I have either worked with or competed with for many years.”

Personal: Hu is on the board of trustees of Virginia’s Hampton University, and she has served on a Commerce Department advisory committee representing small and minority business.

She loves to travel and has visited 85 countries. She is an avid runner, putting in several miles a week on Southern California beaches. “I’m a very disciplined runner. I run every day,” Hu said, “about five or six miles each. Running is like meditation for me. It relaxes my mind.”

Ayesha Curry Gives a Sneak Peek of Her First Cookware Collection

Ayesha Curry is adding another job to her culinary resume: cookware designer.

In a series of Instagram Stories videos on Tuesday, the Food Network star, restaurant owner, cookbook author, and founder of the meal kit delivery service Homemade revealed an early look at her new line of tools and accessories for home cooks.

The star’s first collection with Meyer Corporation, which will make its debut at Target stores nationwide in October, includes porcelain enamel, hard-anodized and stainless steel cookware, cast iron, bakeware, stoneware, pantryware, cutlery and tools.

In the videos, Curry also gives a tour around her Bay Area kitchen, where her products are being photographed for the first time. “Stainless action!” Curry says as she pans over her oven featuring several different stainless steel pots and pans.

RELATED: Ayesha Curry Is Opening Her First Restaurant in the Fall—See What’s on the Menu


Source: Ayesha Curry/Instagram

She then showed off “one of her favorites” to her followers. “It’s called brown sugar,” she says. “Porcelain enamel with a copper interior. How cool is this? And that diamond texture interior.”


Source: Ayesha Curry/Instagram

Curry, who is married to NBA star Stephen Curry and mom to daughters Riley, 5, and Ryan, 2, often shares what she is whipping up in the kitchen — and knows the importance of having quality products.

Want the latest celebrity food news, plus exclusive recipes, videos and more? Click here to subscribe to the PEOPLE Food newsletter


“This is something I’m really excited about,” she says. “I just slaved away making this bacon, got my beautiful cast iron skillet here and a jar for the bacon drippings. Hallelujah. Pasta carbonara’s on the way, holla at your girl.”


Source: Ayesha Curry/Instagram

Curry also shared a preview of her ceramic serveware that will be available in several different colors.

“One of my favorite and most used items, this beautiful dutch pot, dutch oven with my signature knob on the top, it’s a heart,” she adds. “And of course the matching cast iron in the brown sugar color. I just love the flecks, it’s gorgeous.”


RELATED: Ayesha Curry Can Only Get Steph to Cook for Her Once a Year—’If I’m Lucky


Source: Ayesha Curry/Instagram

WATCH THIS: Ayesha Curry ‘Guarantees’ Your Kids Will Eat a Healthy Lunch with This Quick Tip

“I’ve loved cooking since I was a little girl,” Curry says. “I love the way food brings people together, and I couldn’t be more excited to put a little piece of my family into your home.”

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Upstairs Downstairs opens new cookshop at Shrewsbury Market Hall

A slice of “Britain’s Best Cookshop” has opened in Shrewsbury as the daughter of a Shropshire cookware dynasty launches a new boutique version of the business at the town’s Market Hall.


Libby Gliksman has opened the Market Cookshop, in Shrewsbury Market Hall, as a boutique version of Oswestry’s famous Upstairs Downstairs

Libby Gliksman has teamed up with her parents Yossi and Lorraine Gliksman, who run cookware paradise Upstairs Downstairs in Oswestry, to launch the Market Cookshop.

Upstairs Downstairs, a popular destination for culinarians across the Midlands and Wales was established in 1987 and was the winner of the ‘Britain’s Best Cookshop’ award in 2013.

“The Market Cookshop is a mini version of Upstairs Downstairs, selling quality cookware ranging from French casserole dishes, pots and pans to handcrafted products, glassware, wood-fired outdoor ovens and nifty kitchen gadgets,” said Libby.

“Both my parents are really amazing cooks and I’ve grown up surrounded by cookware and wonderful food all my life. I’ve learned from them and developed my own knowledge about food and cooking.

“I’m proud of what my parents have achieved and I wanted to bring a touch of Upstairs Downstairs to Shrewsbury.

“Cooking should be fun, experimental and enjoyable. If you have the right cookware and useful kitchen gadgets, it’s so much easier and very therapeutic. I’m hoping to be able to introduce cooking demonstrations into the Market Hall in the future.

“I love the Market Hall. It’s a special place with a real community spirit. I adore being here. I very much believe in the mantra of live local, shop local and eat locally. With all the wonderful fresh produce, herbs and spices available in the market I thought it would be perfect to sell the quality pans and kitchen accessories with which to cook them.”

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