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Cookware to Make a Chef Jealous – News8000.com




On Your Side 10/12/18 – Cookware


LA CROSSE, Wis. –  

Buying cookware branded by a celebrity won’t make you a better chef or a TV star. But it might be an improvement over cooking on old, warped, and worn out pots and pans. Consumer Reports just tested cookware sets from celebrity names like Rachael Ray and from popular brands like All Clad, Cuisinart, Le Creuset, and more.

 

Browning pancakes to check for cooking evenness, simmering sauces, and sautéing potatoes are just a few of the ways Consumer Reports tests to see how well cookware performs.

 

CR looked at several sets from celebrities. They come in a variety of materials, including anodized aluminum, coated cast iron, and stainless.

 

Testers also looked at nonstick coated pans. The egg-release test checks to see how “nonstick” a pan really is. The eggs should slide off easily without leaving anything behind. In addition, the coated pans are scrubbed with steel wool 2,000 times to see how durable the nonstick coating is.

 

So which sets did best in Consumer Reports’ tests? Nonstick cookware tends to do really well because it releases food easily and is easy to clean.

 

Cuisinart’s Green Gourmet Hard Anodized set for 250-dollars seared the nonstick competition and earned top ratings.

 

But you need more than nonstick pans for a well-rounded cookware collection. There are definitely times you want uncoated cookware like stainless steel or cast iron, especially if you’re searing food. You can’t really get nonstick cookware hot, but you can sear in cast iron and stainless steel.

 

Cookware sets can be costly. Take, for example, the top-rated uncoated All Clad cookware set that costs 600 dollars. Consumer Reports also tested some fry pans separately and suggests buying pots and pans individually.

 

Top scores for individual fry pans went to the 115-dollar All-Clad Tri-Ply Stainless Steel Fry Pan. And for nonstick fry pans, consider Red Copper Nonstick, which is a Best Buy for 20-dollars.

 

Consumer Reports says it’s also important to choose the right cookware for the type of range you have. For smoothtop ranges, look for cookware with a disc base—a dead-flat surface fused to the bottom. For gas ranges, skip the disc bases and opt for solid metal with the same thickness throughout.

 

All Consumer Reports material Copyright 2017 Consumer Reports, Inc. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

 

Consumer Reports is a not-for-profit organization which accepts no advertising. It has no commercial relationship with any advertiser or sponsor on this site. For more information visit consumer.org.

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Food, supply drive for local veterans – WTAJ


Ebensburg, Pa. – A group of volunteers is asking for donations to help local veterans.

The Laurel Highlands Historical Village is holding a veterans food and supply drive at the Walmart in Ebensburg on Saturday, October 20.

They’re collecting food, paper products, kitchen and laundry supplies for veterans and the elderly.

Items needed: Canned goods, canned meats, heat serve meals, rice meals, etc. snacks, rice meals, cheese, meat,  drinks, coffee, drink mixes, paper goods, hygiene products, small gifts, small kitchen appliances (blender, mixer, coffee pots, crock pots, etc.), kitchen towels, mixing bowls, cookware, carpets, bath and kitchen towels, etc.

The group is also collecting any used unwanted digital camera, video cameras and related equipment for their after-school program where they teach children photography skills. 

Any questions please call the LHHV office at 814-241-6123

The drive runs from 8 a.m. – 6 p.m.

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Food, supply drive for local veterans – WTAJ


Ebensburg, Pa. – A group of volunteers is asking for donations to help local veterans.

The Laurel Highlands Historical Village is holding a veterans food and supply drive at the Walmart in Ebensburg on Saturday, October 20.

They’re collecting food, paper products, kitchen and laundry supplies for veterans and the elderly.

Items needed: Canned goods, canned meats, heat serve meals, rice meals, etc. snacks, rice meals, cheese, meat,  drinks, coffee, drink mixes, paper goods, hygiene products, small gifts, small kitchen appliances (blender, mixer, coffee pots, crock pots, etc.), kitchen towels, mixing bowls, cookware, carpets, bath and kitchen towels, etc.

The group is also collecting any used unwanted digital camera, video cameras and related equipment for their after-school program where they teach children photography skills. 

Any questions please call the LHHV office at 814-241-6123

The drive runs from 8 a.m. – 6 p.m.

Category: Cookware Pots  Tags: ,  Comments off

Food, supply drive for local veterans – WTAJ


Ebensburg, Pa. – A group of volunteers is asking for donations to help local veterans.

The Laurel Highlands Historical Village is holding a veterans food and supply drive at the Walmart in Ebensburg on Saturday, October 20.

They’re collecting food, paper products, kitchen and laundry supplies for veterans and the elderly.

Items needed: Canned goods, canned meats, heat serve meals, rice meals, etc. snacks, rice meals, cheese, meat,  drinks, coffee, drink mixes, paper goods, hygiene products, small gifts, small kitchen appliances (blender, mixer, coffee pots, crock pots, etc.), kitchen towels, mixing bowls, cookware, carpets, bath and kitchen towels, etc.

The group is also collecting any used unwanted digital camera, video cameras and related equipment for their after-school program where they teach children photography skills. 

Any questions please call the LHHV office at 814-241-6123

The drive runs from 8 a.m. – 6 p.m.

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Our view: Remembering a New England original

Before there was the Ronco Rotisserie Grill, the Popeil Pocket Fisherman, the Shamwow or the Snuggie, there was Saladmaster. And for decades, Christos “Chris” Nahatis was the face of the cookware brand.

If TV viewers across New England weren’t lured in by Nahatis’ rapid-fire delivery, they surely stopped to watch him handle Saladmaster’s pots and pans with the nimble dexterity of a magician performing a card trick. Nahatis was proud of what he was selling, too. He would often seal the deal by banging a Saladmaster pot against a competitor’s offering. The Saladmaster cookware would always be unharmed. The same could not be said for the competition.

Nahatis, a lifelong resident of Manchester, passed away earlier this month at the age of 95. It’s no surprise that he became an infomercial pioneer. He got his start as a teenager selling suits around town to support his family. He hooked up with the mail-order Saladmaster business in 1951 and made history a few years later when he pulled carrots and lettuce from his pocket and feeding them through a company food processor during a spot on a Providence TV station.

In short order, he was doing regular 60-second spots on WBZ in Boston, making himself part of New England history. 

“I truly learned to make the Saladmaster ‘talk,’” he wrote in his memoir, “What-A-Hell-Ova-Way To Make A Living,” released last October. “I eventually perfected the presentation so well, I hardly ever missed a sale.”

Next month, many families will pull Saladmaster pots and pans — some bought decades ago — from their cupboards to help cook Thanksgiving dinner. And chances are, it was Nahatis who made the sale. 

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EDITORIAL: Remembering a New England original | Editorials …

Before there was the Ronco Rotisserie Grill, the Popeil Pocket Fisherman, the Shamwow or the Snuggie, there was Saladmaster. And for decades, Christos “Chris” Nahatis was the face of the cookware brand.

If TV viewers across New England weren’t lured in by Nahatis’ rapid-fire delivery, they surely stopped to watch him handle Saladmaster’s pots and pans with the nimble dexterity of a magician performing a card trick. Nahatis was proud of what he was selling, too. He would often seal the deal by banging a Saladmaster pot against a competitor’s offering. The Saladmaster cookware would always be unharmed. The same could not be said for the competition.

Nahatis, a lifelong resident of Manchester, passed away earlier this month at the age of 95. It’s no surprise that he became an infomercial pioneer. He got his start as a teenager selling suits around town to support his family. He hooked up with the mail-order Saladmaster business in 1951 and made history a few years later when he pulled carrots and lettuce from his pocket and fed them through a company food processor during a spot on a Providence TV station.

In short order, he was doing regular 60-second spots on WBZ in Boston, making himself part of New England history. 

“I truly learned to make the Saladmaster ‘talk,’” he wrote in his memoir, “What-A-Hell-Ova-Way To Make A Living,” released last October. “I eventually perfected the presentation so well, I hardly ever missed a sale.”

Next month, many families will pull Saladmaster pots and pans — some bought decades ago — from their cupboards to help cook Thanksgiving dinner. And chances are, it was Nahatis who made the sale.

Category: Cookware Pots  Tags: ,  Comments off

EDITORIAL: Remembering a New England original | Editorials …

Before there was the Ronco Rotisserie Grill, the Popeil Pocket Fisherman, the Shamwow or the Snuggie, there was Saladmaster. And for decades, Christos “Chris” Nahatis was the face of the cookware brand.

If TV viewers across New England weren’t lured in by Nahatis’ rapid-fire delivery, they surely stopped to watch him handle Saladmaster’s pots and pans with the nimble dexterity of a magician performing a card trick. Nahatis was proud of what he was selling, too. He would often seal the deal by banging a Saladmaster pot against a competitor’s offering. The Saladmaster cookware would always be unharmed. The same could not be said for the competition.

Nahatis, a lifelong resident of Manchester, passed away earlier this month at the age of 95. It’s no surprise that he became an infomercial pioneer. He got his start as a teenager selling suits around town to support his family. He hooked up with the mail-order Saladmaster business in 1951 and made history a few years later when he pulled carrots and lettuce from his pocket and fed them through a company food processor during a spot on a Providence TV station.

In short order, he was doing regular 60-second spots on WBZ in Boston, making himself part of New England history. 

“I truly learned to make the Saladmaster ‘talk,’” he wrote in his memoir, “What-A-Hell-Ova-Way To Make A Living,” released last October. “I eventually perfected the presentation so well, I hardly ever missed a sale.”

Next month, many families will pull Saladmaster pots and pans — some bought decades ago — from their cupboards to help cook Thanksgiving dinner. And chances are, it was Nahatis who made the sale.

Category: Cookware Pots  Tags: ,  Comments off