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Collecting: Fiesta dinnerware is a colorful collectible

My mom had several pieces of Fiesta. One of the more unusual pieces is a 8-inch vase in turquoise. I have not been able to find it in the Fiesta price guide I have. Can you help me? — Sam, Fort Worth, Texas

The 8-inch vase was produced for about a decade and was discontinued in 1948. Your vase is either marked “Fiesta HLC USA” or “Fiesta Made in USA.” I found your vase referenced in Fiesta, by Glen Victorey and published by Krause Books. According to Victorey, your vase is valued in the $600 to $650 range.

I have a hand-cranked Handel Webster pencil sharpener in working condition. I have been offered $75 for it by a dealer. Can you tell me what it is worth? — Walter, Haines City, Fla.

An antique dealer generally offers about half of what he or she thinks they can sell an item for full retail. That leads me to believe your pencil sharpener is probably worth more, perhaps as much as $150. Remember, this is just my educated guess, not an appraisal. A free appraisal is worth what you pay for it.

I have a World War I uniform in perfect condition. I have the campaign hat, gas mask and other accessory pieces. Whom do you suggest I contact to determine its value? — Norm, Jerseyville, Ill.

Although there are dozens of excellent shops that specialize in military memorabilia, one of the better ones is “History by George” in Mesa, Ariz. George Notarpole is the owner and an expert in this field of collecting. He can help you determine the value of your uniform. Contact is 129 W. Main St., Mesa, AZ 85201; notarpole@historybygeorge.com.

I have a porcelain plate commemorating the 56th annual convention of the National Association of Postmasters held in Florida in 1960. How much is it worth? — Judy, Ronceverte, W.Va.

I could not find your particular plate in any of my references, but I have seen similar ones selling in the $10 to $20 range. A postal collector might pay slightly more.

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Collecting: Fiesta dinnerware is a colorful collectible | Lifestyle …

My mom had several pieces of Fiesta. One of the more unusual pieces is a 8-inch vase in turquoise. I have not been able to find it in the Fiesta price guide I have. Can you help me? — Sam, Fort Worth, Texas

The 8-inch vase was produced for about a decade and was discontinued in 1948. Your vase is either marked “Fiesta HLC USA” or “Fiesta Made in USA.” I found your vase referenced in Fiesta, by Glen Victorey and published by Krause Books. According to Victorey, your vase is valued in the $600 to $650 range.

I have a hand-cranked Handel Webster pencil sharpener in working condition. I have been offered $75 for it by a dealer. Can you tell me what it is worth? — Walter, Haines City, Fla.

An antique dealer generally offers about half of what he or she thinks they can sell an item for full retail. That leads me to believe your pencil sharpener is probably worth more, perhaps as much as $150. Remember, this is just my educated guess, not an appraisal. A free appraisal is worth what you pay for it.

I have a World War I uniform in perfect condition. I have the campaign hat, gas mask and other accessory pieces. Whom do you suggest I contact to determine its value? — Norm, Jerseyville, Ill.

Although there are dozens of excellent shops that specialize in military memorabilia, one of the better ones is “History by George” in Mesa, Ariz. George Notarpole is the owner and an expert in this field of collecting. He can help you determine the value of your uniform. Contact is 129 W. Main St., Mesa, AZ 85201; notarpole@historybygeorge.com.

I have a porcelain plate commemorating the 56th annual convention of the National Association of Postmasters held in Florida in 1960. How much is it worth? — Judy, Ronceverte, W.Va.

I could not find your particular plate in any of my references, but I have seen similar ones selling in the $10 to $20 range. A postal collector might pay slightly more.

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Fiesta Dinnerware Adds Tile Line

For the Fiestaware collector who has everything, there’s a line of Fiesta Porcelain Tiles.

Fiesta partnered with Pittsburgh-based Limelite Tile and Ceramics to make the collection of tiles. The first orders shipped last week.

“Fiesta porcelain tiles are a logical evolution for our brand,” says Rich Brinkman, VP sales marketing at Homer Laughlin in Newell, W.Va. “We often hear stories of people remodeling their kitchens around their Fiesta dishes; now they can take that one step further with a series of beautiful tiles for their backsplash or countertops.”

The tiles, which require a 4- to 6-week lead time on orders, are available in the 15 current Fiesta colors: Claret, Daffodil, Lapis, Poppy, Sage, Slate, White, Turquoise, Cobalt, Scarlet, Tangerine, Sunflower, Ivory, Lemongrass and Shamrock.

The tile is made in the USA and comes in a variety of different combinations, including the following collections: Circle Cross, 4×8, 3×6 and 6×6. Each collection has distinguishing characteristics reminiscent of the iconic Fiesta Dinnerware, such as concentric circles and art deco styling.

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Fiesta dinnerware is a colorful collectible

My mom had several pieces of Fiesta. One of the more unusual pieces is a 8-inch vase in turquoise. I have not been able to find it in the Fiesta price guide I have. Can you help me? — Sam, Fort Worth, Texas

The 8-inch vase was produced for about a decade and was discontinued in 1948. Your vase is either marked “Fiesta HLC USA” or “Fiesta Made in USA.” I found your vase referenced in Fiesta, by Glen Victorey and published by Krause Books. According to Victorey, your vase is valued in the $600 to $650 range.

I have a hand-cranked Handel Webster pencil sharpener in working condition. I have been offered $75 for it by a dealer. Can you tell me what it is worth? — Walter, Haines City, Fla.

An antique dealer generally offers about half of what he or she thinks they can sell an item for full retail. That leads me to believe your pencil sharpener is probably worth more, perhaps as much as $150. Remember, this is just my educated guess, not an appraisal. A free appraisal is worth what you pay for it.

I have a World War I uniform in perfect condition. I have the campaign hat, gas mask and other accessory pieces. Whom do you suggest I contact to determine its value? — Norm, Jerseyville, Ill.

Although there are dozens of excellent shops that specialize in military memorabilia, one of the better ones is “History by George” in Mesa, Ariz. George Notarpole is the owner and an expert in this field of collecting. He can help you determine the value of your uniform. Contact is 129 W. Main St., Mesa, AZ 85201; notarpole@historybygeorge.com.

I have a porcelain plate commemorating the 56th annual convention of the National Association of Postmasters held in Florida in 1960. How much is it worth? — Judy, Ronceverte, W.Va.

I could not find your particular plate in any of my references, but I have seen similar ones selling in the $10 to $20 range. A postal collector might pay slightly more.

Write to Larry Cox in care of KFWS, 628 Virginia Drive, Orlando, FL 32803 or send e-mail to questionsforcox@aol.com. Due to the large volume of mail he receives, Mr. Cox cannot personally answer all reader questions nor does he do appraisals. Do not send any materials requiring return mail. © 2017 King Features Synd., Inc.

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Scoop: Courteney Cox embracing ‘smile lines’ these days



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It’s almost revolutionary: Courteney Cox is bucking the Hollywood trend and going natural.

In a cover story for New Beauty magazine, the 53-year-old actress — whose sweetheart Johnny McDaid is a mere 40 — said she has stopped trying to look younger by using facial fillers.

“You need movement in your face, especially if you have thin skin like I do,” she said. “Those aren’t wrinkles — they’re smile lines. I’ve had to learn to embrace movement and realize that fillers are not my friend.”

Comparison photos on the UK Daily Mail website illustrate quite a difference between today and a 2015 shot in which the actress indeed looks puffy and stilted.

Cox said her odd appearance didn’t happen all at once, but it was something she noticed after injections and treatments here and there built up: “You have no idea because it’s gradual until you go, ‘Oh, s—, this doesn’t look right.’”

In other age-related comments, the mother of 13-year-old Coco with ex-husband David Arquette also said she would love to have another baby: “I could carry someone else’s egg. I may be one of the older people doing it, but I would love to, with Johnny that is.”

MIRREN PRAISES DIVERSITY

Helen Mirren is finding progress when it comes to age and beauty.

But the Oscar winner said that in 2014, when she was 69 and cosmetics giant L’Oreal asked her to be a brand ambassador, she thought, “it was about bloody time!”

“I thought at last there has been a shift [in the fashion industry] — I’m talking about age and beauty, but also diversity,” the English actress said to an audience at the Cannes Lions Festival of Creativity on Tuesday.

She said that when she lived with fashion photographer James Wedge in the 1970s, “he could not get a black girl on the front of a magazine. Now, finally, the breakthrough has happened. … And now it’s great to see older women, different genders, different religions — the whole diversity of the world we are living in.”

QUICK TAKES

East Bay fine dinnerware manufacturer Jered’s Pottery announced that Brandon Jew, chef-owner of Mister Jiu’s in San Francisco, won its third Clay With Your Food competition — a contest of cooking and ceramic skills — taking honors over chef Jeff Russell (of the in-progress Charlie Palmer Steak in Napa), and chef Adam Tortosa, who’s about to open Robin in Hayes Valley; judges were food writer Rebecca Flint Marx, chef Daniel Patterson and painter Victor Reyes.

HAPPY BIRTHDAY

TV personality Carson Daly is 44. … Singer Cyndi Lauper is 64. … Actress Meryl Streep is 68. … Singer Todd Rundgren is 69. … Singer Peter Asher of Peter and Gordon is 73. … Singer-actor Kris Kristofferson is 81. … U.S. Sen. Dianne Feinstein is 84.

— Staff, wire reports

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Oklahoma’s ‘Pioneer Woman’ builds media empire on the Plains

PAWHUSKA, Okla. (AP) — Growing up in an Oklahoma town she considered too tiny, Ree Drummond sought the bright lights of a city and headed west for Los Angeles.

She never dreamed the journey would send her back to the plains of northeast Oklahoma, to a place with even fewer lights where she’s become known and built a brand as “The Pioneer Woman.”

Visitors from all 50 states, Canada, South America and England have come to The Pioneer Woman Mercantile, a store-bakery-restaurant she and her husband opened after starting a popular blog, then writing New York Times best-selling cookbooks and children’s books, hosting a Food Network cooking show and, her most recent venture, The Pioneer Woman Magazine. The magazine is the first of two planned editions released this month and available at The Mercantile and at Walmart, where she also has a signature line of cooking, kitchen and dinnerware. Her digital and print catalogues are all full of her quips about motherhood and quick-and-easy meals mixed with musings on her late basset hound and comparing her current life in cowgirl boots to one where she used to wear pumps.

Recent blog entries covered everything from taking her homeschooled children to see the musical “Hamilton” on Broadway to finally finishing the TV show “Breaking Bad” and a forthcoming cookbook. Sony Pictures holds an option for a possible movie on her book “Black Heels to Tractor Wheels,” in which she recounts how she met her husband, who isn’t a smoker but whom she often calls “Marlboro Man.

“I think people are drawn to ‘The Pioneer Woman,’ not because I am some fascinating person, but because I present things that a lot of people can relate to,” a self-effacing Drummond said in an interview with The Associated Press at the store, a retail and restaurant location she and her husband opened in October. “I’m not a chef, and I’m not an expert at anything. I’m just a mom and a wife.”

Drummond grew up the daughter of a surgeon in Bartlesville, a town of about 36,000 people about 20 miles (32 kilometers) east of Pawhuska. As she puts it, she grew up on the seventh fairway of a golf course, a far cry from the working cattle ranch she now calls home. She left for school at the University of Southern California and, a few years after graduating, planned to move closer to home, to Chicago.

Her plans took a detour when she stopped for a visit in Bartlesville where she joined some friends at a bar and met “a cowboy wearing Wranglers.” She went on to marry him in 1996, and never made it to the Windy City.

The cowboy, Ladd Drummond, is part of a prominent family that operates a more than 400,000-acre (162,000-hectare) cattle ranch in Osage County, about 7 miles (11 kilometers) west of Pawhuska, population about 3,900.

“It was, kind of just, love that got me out here, and then after we got married I thought, ‘Oh my gosh, what have I done?’ You know, ‘Where am I, and this is real. I live in the country,'” Ree Drummond said. “If I had sat down and tried to plan an empire there’s no way, no way any of this would have happened.”

It’s paying off for her and, town leaders hope, Pawhuska.

About 150 miles (240 kilometers) northeast of Oklahoma City, Pawhuska has one stoplight that blinks red in four directions. Most of the last 40 miles (64 kilometers) of a two-lane state highway headed into town from the west are dotted with ranches, occasional cellphone towers, more than 100 windmills, and no signs with directions to the town, much less Drummond’s store which she and locals call “The Merc.”

Pawhuska City Manager Mike McCartney said he hopes to see an increase in the town’s “less than 50” motel rooms with plans to renovate a five-story building across the street from The Mercantile into a hotel. Many visitors stay in nearby Bartlesville or Ponca City, he said.

Outside The Mercantile, drivers stop on Main Street to allow pedestrians to cross. On a sweltering June morning, as temperatures approached 90 degrees (32 Celsius), a line of people about 200 feet (60 meters) long and three to five persons wide, in spots, waited to enter the restaurant. Estimated wait time: more than two hours.

“If it’s as good as all of her food that she cooks on her show” it will be worth the wait, said Laura Burton, 67, of Broken Arrow, Oklahoma.

Kelli Linch, 52, of Rea, Missouri, drove more than five hours to eat at The Mercantile. She eventually opted for a takeout order.

Linch said there are many things she admires about Drummond, including that she often speaks on her show about her church and her family.

“I like that she’s simple, and just a Plain Jane kind of gal,” Linch said.

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USS Missouri gets some historic dinnerware back onboard

First it was the ship’s bell .. now some of the silver service is back onboard the USS Missouri battleship. Cole County Commissioner Sam Bushman, KWOS Saturday Open Air’s Hal Dulle and a National Guard official escorted the heirlooms back to Pearl Harbor …

Dulle says the ship’s silver dinnerware was brought to Missouri for safekeeping after the battleship was initially decommissioned. He retired as Missouri Veteran’s Commission Director.

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