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Ottolenghi’s skin-crisped salmon fillets with pine-nut salsa was mentioned in a British movie



Serves 4

You need two skillets for this; one to make the salsa, the other to cook the salmon.

1. Cover the currants with boiling water; set aside for 20 minutes.

2. On a large plate, mix the salmon with 1 tablespoon of the oil, and a generous pinch of salt and pepper.

3. In a large skillet, heat 5 tablespoons of the oil. Add the chopped celery and pine nuts and cook, stirring often, for 4 minutes, or until the nuts start to brown (they can burn easily). Remove the pan from the heat. Stir in the capers and brine, olives, saffron and liquid, and a pinch of salt. Drain the currants and add to the pan with the parsley, and lemon rind and juice; set aside.

4. In another large skillet over medium-high heat, heat the remaining 1 tablespoon oil. Add the salmon, skin side down, and cook for 3 minutes, or until the skin is very crisp. Lower the heat to medium, turn the salmon, and continue cooking for 2 to 4 minutes (depending on how much you like the salmon cooked).

5. Arrange the salmon on each of 4 plates and spoon over the salsa. Garnish with celery leaves. Sheryl Julian. Adapted from
“Ottolenghi SIMPLE”

Sheryl Julian can be reached at sheryl.julian@globe.com. Follow her on Twitter @sheryljulian.

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One of Our Favorite Cast-Iron Brands Just Made the Perfect Breakfast Skillet

Released this morning, Smithey Ironware Company’s 8-inch cast-iron skillet is its easiest to handle and lowest priced.

Founder Isaac Morton got started in cast-iron cookware after he received a hand-me-down Griswold skillet and wanted to replicate the level of craftsmanship he observed in older pieces. In his words, “When I saw that old piece, I got it.” The hallmarks of his pans are similar to those of cast iron of old — perfectly smooth cooking surfaces, a hole-punched handle and even a heat ring (an homage to the time of wood-fired stoves). His cast-iron skillets don’t share everything with older skillets, though — they’re heavier, meaning they hold heat more effectively when cold food is thrown in, and they sport a hole-punched front lip as well, which makes the skillets easier to grip with a gloved hand (or hang from the wall).

The 8-inch skillet accompanies Smithey’s 10- ($160) and 12-inch ($200) skillets, and while not big enough for bacon (unless you were to cut it in half), it is an excellent quick breakfast pan. “Well, we developed it for about two years, and all I was really trying to do was make the perfect omelet skillet,” Morton said. “But it’s also just a better option for sauteeing a few veggies.” (The 8-inch skillet also sports a longer, upward-sloping handle, which is helpful for tossing said veggies at safe distance.)

Morton is right. It is an incredible omelet maker. Frankly, it’s suited perfectly for any delicate egg cooking, be it omelets, frittatas, quiche or a few fried eggs. This is thanks to the machined surface working in tandem with sloped walls, a new feature to the Smithey line of skillets, as opposed to the traditional hard angle where the wall meets the cooking surface.

The rounded transition from wall to the base also makes it easier to clean, as food particles don’t wedge themselves as easily in the crevasses of the pan.

The Smithey Ironware 8-inch skillet is available now for $100.

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The 5 Best Skillets For Omelets

This Cuisinart skillet set has a few different things going for it. First, it comes in a set of two, so you’re paying the same price as the T-fal skillet above, but for double the product. Thanks to the aluminum construction, both 10-inch pans provide great heat-distribution, and the non-stick surface allows your omelet to be cooked without much fuss. The ergonomic handle on each pan has a contoured shape for a secure grasp, and it’s also designed to stay cool throughout use. These pans are interlocking and can be used separately or as a unit, making it possible to expertly flip your omelet without dropping it, spilling it, or creating a big mess. These dishwasher-safe pans also feature a lifetime warranty, so you can feel confident you’re making a worthwhile purchase.

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Heavy metal in the kitchen

Cast iron, once a common material for pots and pans, has tended in recent years to be used most visibly by either pro chefs or campers. Now it’s trending again in this fall’s kitchenware product previews.

Options range from basic skillets to grill pans to pots both diminutive (for sauces) and expansive (for stews and soups).

Chef Kevin Korman is about to open his new restaurant, Whitebird, in the Edwin Hotel in Chattanooga, Tenn. On his menu: fondue, baked eggs and a savory Dutch pancake, all prepared using cast iron pans.

“Our cuisine is defined as Progressive Appalachian,” Korman says, “and cast-iron cooking played a large role in the history of Appalachia.”

The Tennessee Valley is rich in iron ore, so companies like Lodge Cast Iron set up home there. Korman will be using Lodge products in his kitchens, but aside from supporting a local maker, the material’s performance is what he cares about.

“Not only does cast iron retain heat better than anything else, the distribution of heat is really what makes it a winner,” Korman says. “Every part of the pan gives off an equal amount, so you don’t end up with certain areas that burn while others are still waiting to get some color. This was a big consideration when we were developing dishes for the menu.”

Korman recalls meals prepared on cast iron at his grandmother’s house, and he has carried on the tradition with his own family.

“I have several sizes that I use daily at home for just about everything,” he says. “Both of my daughters love to help me cook, so I hope to hand the pans down to them as they get older.”

Beyond durability, cast iron’s big selling point is the heat retention that Korman mentioned. But bear in mind that it doesn’t heat evenly initially, so always let the pan come to the needed temperature on the burner before adding ingredients. That way, you’ll get a nice crisp sear and a consistent cook with your cast iron.

New finishing methods are improving the wearability and performance of cast iron.

Today, makers like Finex in Portland, Ore. smooth and polish the pans’ interiors so that eggs and sauces don’t stick. An ergonomically designed, coiled-spring, wrapped-steel handle stays cooler than traditional handles, and the skillets are octagonal, making pouring and stirring easier. Cast-iron lids provide a flavor seal for steaming, simmering and braising.

The Museum of Modern Art’s gift shop has a cast-iron item this season: the Railway Dutch Oven, made in Holland out of recycled iron railway ties. A built-in thermometer helps monitor cooking progress, and the tool can be used stovetop or oven.

Williams-Sonoma stocks the French brand Staub: There’s a red or blue-enameled two-handled skillet that goes nicely from stovetop or oven to table, and a glass-lidded braiser in black, grenadine or sapphire. Also at the retailer: a little iron saucepot with a platform base, designed to use on grills. It comes with a silicone-handled, mop-headed basting brush for glazing barbecued foods.

Seasoning is key to optimizing cast iron’s performance; it helps “cure” the iron so food doesn’t stick, and over time helps impart layers of flavor.

To season a new pan yourself, lightly wash it as directed, then add a tablespoon of oil and massage it thoroughly into the iron, wiping any excess with a paper towel. Place the pan in an oven at 350 degrees Fahrenheit and let it “bake” for about an hour. Remove and wipe off any excess oil before using or storing.

You can buy pre-seasoned pans, which just need a little refresh once in a while.

Williams-Sonoma, Sur La Table and Crate Barrel all carry several of Lodge’s pre-seasoned cast-iron pieces.

But it’s still a good idea to refresh the seasoning if you use your pans often. It can even be done stovetop: Heat the pan until it’s hot, swab some oil into it, then let it cool.

While some people prefer not to use soap and water to clean cast iron, thinking it removes the oil coating, Serious Eats’ chief culinary consultant Kenji Lopez-Alt says it’s fine to do so.

“The one thing you shouldn’t do? Let it soak in the sink,” he says. “Try to minimize the time it takes from when you start cleaning to when you dry and re-season your pan.”

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Watch: How Cast Iron Pans Are Forged

I’ve used cast iron pans my entire life — both in and out of professional kitchens — but never once thought about how they are made. Even if I had, I couldn’t have imagined the intense, multi-step process they carry out at Roloff Manufacturing Corporation in Kaukauna, Wisconsin.

I’m meeting with Alisa Toninato in this episode of How to Make It, who is the owner of Felion Studios — a studio specializing in cast iron art; and the American Skillet Company, recognized for its cast iron skillets made in the shapes of the 50 states. It’s amazing to me that not every kitchen has a cast iron pan. Easily the most versatile and durable pan in the house, a good cast iron skillet will yield the best mac and cheese, perfectly roast a chicken, and make some expert pancakes.

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Heavy metal in the kitchen – The Register

Fans of cast iron tout even heat distribution

Cast iron, once a common material for pots and pans, has tended in recent years to be used most visibly by either pro chefs or campers. Now it’s trending again in this fall’s kitchenware product previews.

Options range from basic skillets to grill pans to pots both diminutive (for sauces) and expansive (for stews and soups).

Chef Kevin Korman is about to open his new restaurant, Whitebird, in the Edwin Hotel in Chattanooga, Tenn. On his menu: fondue, baked eggs and a savory Dutch pancake, all prepared using cast iron pans.

“Our cuisine is defined as Progressive Appalachian,” Korman says, “and cast-iron cooking played a large role in the history of Appalachia.”

The Tennessee Valley is rich in iron ore, so companies like Lodge Cast Iron set up home there. Korman will be using Lodge products in his kitchens, but aside from supporting a local maker, the material’s performance is what he cares about.

“Not only does cast iron retain heat better than anything else, the distribution of heat is really what makes it a winner,” Korman says. “Every part of the pan gives off an equal amount, so you don’t end up with certain areas that burn while others are still waiting to get some color. This was a big consideration when we were developing dishes for the menu.”

Korman recalls meals prepared on cast iron at his grandmother’s house, and he has carried on the tradition with his own family.

“I have several sizes that I use daily at home for just about everything,” he says. “Both of my daughters love to help me cook, so I hope to hand the pans down to them as they get older.”

Beyond durability, cast iron’s big selling point is the heat retention that Korman mentioned. But bear in mind that it doesn’t heat evenly initially, so always let the pan come to the needed temperature on the burner before adding ingredients. That way, you’ll get a nice crisp sear and a consistent cook with your cast iron.

New finishing methods are improving the wearability and performance of cast iron.

Today, makers like Finex in Portland, Oreg., smooth and polish the pans’ interiors so that eggs and sauces don’t stick. An ergonomically designed, coiled-spring, wrapped-steel handle stays cooler than traditional handles, and the skillets are octagonal, making pouring and stirring easier. Cast-iron lids provide a flavor seal for steaming, simmering and braising.

The Museum of Modern Art’s gift shop has a cast-iron item this season: the Railway Dutch Oven, made in Holland out of recycled iron railway ties. A built-in thermometer helps monitor cooking progress, and the tool can be used on the stove top or in the oven.

Williams-Sonoma stocks the French brand Staub: There’s a red or blue-enameled two-handled skillet that goes nicely from stove top or oven to table, and a glass-lidded braiser in black, grenadine or sapphire. Also at the retailer: a little iron sauce pot with a platform base, designed to use on grills. It comes with a silicone-handled, mop-headed basting brush for glazing barbecued foods.

Seasoning is key to optimizing cast iron’s performance; it helps “cure” the iron so food doesn’t stick, and over time helps impart layers of flavor.

To season a new pan yourself, lightly wash it as directed, then add a tablespoon of oil and massage it thoroughly into the iron, wiping any excess with a paper towel. Place the pan in an oven at 350 degrees Fahrenheit and let it “bake” for about an hour. Remove and wipe off any excess oil before using or storing.

You can buy pre-seasoned pans, which just need a little refresh once in a while.

Williams-Sonoma, Sur La Table and Crate Barrel all carry several of Lodge’s pre-seasoned cast-iron pieces.

But it’s still a good idea to refresh the seasoning if you use your pans often. It can even be done on the stove top: Heat the pan until it’s hot, swab some oil into it, then let it cool.

While some people prefer not to use soap and water to clean cast iron, thinking it removes the oil coating, Serious Eats’ chief culinary consultant Kenji Lopez-Alt says it’s fine to do so.

“The one thing you shouldn’t do? Let it soak in the sink,” he says. “Try to minimize the time it takes from when you start cleaning to when you dry and re-season your pan.”

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Want a Finex Cast-Iron Skillet? This Is as Cheap as They’ll Come.


The Best Deals of the Day: October 12, 2018

How to save on premium suede chelsea boots, Finex cast-iron skillets, Levi’s denim and much more.

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