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Burnt Toast may be the name, but inside you’ll find delicious breakfasts

Burnt toast is not something you’d want to have on your plate. But Burnt Toast Restaurant in Elgin was named for a gag gift and the name stuck.

“We’re known for our bacon and French toast,” said manager Veronica Camacho, who’s been with Burnt Toast for eight years. “Our bacon and eggs are popular and are many of our key items, along with our skillets.”

Camacho said breakfast is so popular “I don’t know if people know we have lunch. We have amazing lunch items. Like BLTs, burgers and lots of organic items.”

“But try one of the French toast dishes: Our famous French toast topped with Indonesian cinnamon sugar, the stuffed French toast with cream cheese and berries, or the Grand Marnier French toast with the orange-flavored cognac-based liqueur in the batter and as a sauce topping, along with sauteed bananas, pecans and cinnamon sugar.

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How to Turn a Fridge Full of Sad Produce Into Dinner


Photo: A.A. Newton, Graphic: Sam Woolley

We’ve all stared down a sad, empty fridge at too-late-for-a-grocery-run-o’clock on a weeknight, willing some higher power to magically replenish the shelves while our eyes are closed.

Welcome to Cheap Chow week! Food is more expensive than ever, and it may seem like your only cost-effective options are fast food or instant ramen. But it doesn’t have to be that way. This week we’ll be showing you how to buy, cook, and eat food in a fiscally effective manner, without sacrificing fun or flavor.

Using up what you have is a great way to save money and minimize waste, but so many “empty fridge” recipes play fast and loose with what people actually keep in their pantries, making them, at best, minimally useful. Everyone’s pantry staples are different, and when those recipes call for cheese, lemons, anchovies, fresh herbs, or similar, I usually roll my eyes. As much as I love those things and try to keep them around, sometimes I end up with like, one carrot, a handful of scallions that somehow haven’t turned to ooze, a sweet potato of indeterminate age, a rapidly-softening bell pepper, and a fridge door groaning under the weight of my condiment addiction. Add in a powerful hunger and a budget that cannot support another pizza delivery and I’m well on my way to Meltdown City.

Enter, once again, Maangchi, who has broadened my repertoire in uncountably many ways. As a depressed person who sometimes struggles to feel worthy of not starving to death, I have not been the same (in a good way!) since I found her recipe for yachaejon, or spring vegetable pancakes. This is the sad-fridge recipe to end all sad-fridge recipes: not only does it make use of whatever random produce you have, it transforms them into something unbelievably good. These aren’t fluffy hotcakes folded with leftover steamed broccoli or whatever—they’re crunchy, salty, fried goodness that happens to be mostly made of vegetables. All you need to make them is roughly a pound of thinly-sliced vegetables, plus flour, water, salt, and a bit of oil for frying; no eggs, no leaveners, no milk, and no bullshit.

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Facts are facts, America: not everyone hoards tinned Sicilian anchovies or fresh parsley for a rainy day, but most people probably have a cup of flour somewhere. Furthermore, most people have a tap in their kitchen that dispenses potable water (though, even in this land of alleged plenty, this is still not true for everyone), a dash of salt, and some cooking oil. If you have these things and a fridge full of sad produce, you can make something absolutely delicious in very little time. Here’s how to do it.

Empty-Fridge Vegetable Pancakes


Photo: A.A. Newton

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It bears repeating that you can use just about any vegetables you like so long as at least one of them is an onion (scallions are my favorite). Other than that, go wild: sturdy greens like kale and collards are great, but spinach, cabbage, or even lettuce will work when finely shredded. Root veg should get ribboned with a peeler; anything else should be julienned or sliced on the bias as finely as you can manage. If you’re gluten-free, I recommend a GF all-purpose flour blend over cornstarch or potato starch, which fry up crispy on the edges but get weird and gummy on the inside.

As written, this recipe yields five large pancakes or ten to twelve small ones. Feel free to scale the vegetables and flour/water up and down to suit your needs; as long as you end up with a similar ratio of vegetable to batter, it’ll be fine.

Ingredients:

  • 1 ½ pounds (680 grams) assorted vegetables, including some form of onion
  • ¾ cup (roughly 100 grams, depending on brand) all-purpose flour
  • ½ teaspoon table salt
  • ¾ cup (roughly 175 milliliters) water
  • Vegetable or canola oil for shallow-frying (I rarely use more than a quarter cup)

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Instructions:

Set a wide, heavy-bottomed skillet over low heat while you prepare the vegetables. A good nonstick pan is great if you have one, but I usually make mine in a nine-inch cast-iron or stainless steel skillet. If I’m making more than two pancakes, I’ll use both my twelve- and nine-inch cast iron skillets in tandem.


Today’s lineup: a bunch of stuff I wanted to use up before going on a trip.
Photo: A.A. Newton

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Shred, julienne, ribbon or otherwise very finely slice your vegetables into a large bowl. The thinner the slices, the more likely the batter is to hang together and flip nicely.

Add the flour and water to the bowl, then season with half a teaspoon of salt. If you want to add some dried spices, now’s the time. Stir until the batter is completely distributed through the vegetables, using your hands if needed to really work everything together.


Photo: A.A. Newton

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Increase the heat under the skillet(s) to medium-high, wait a minute, then add enough vegetable or canola oil to cover the bottom. Continue heating the oil until it’s shimmering and just barely smoking, then add the vegetable batter to the skillet by the handful, allowing any excess liquid to drip back into the mixing bowl. If you’re making small pancakes, you can probably fit two or three in a nine-inch skillet, but I tend to make plate-sized ones.

Use a sturdy spatula to smash the pancakes into thin disks, and cook for at least three minutes per side, or however long it takes to develop a dark, golden-brown crust. I make very large pancakes, so these sometimes take up to five minutes perside. Check in frequently and adjust the heat if it seems too high.

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Where to eat breakfast, lunch and dinner in Park City, Utah

In an old Utah mining town that has turned into a mountain resort, you would expect a healthy dose of burgers, skillets and other eat-and-get-back-out-there fare. Park City has all that. But thanks to relentless development and investment – including Vail Resorts’ 2014 acquisition of the local ski mountain – dining options run the international gamut, including tapas, sushi, nouveau American, Indian, Italian and (who would’ve guessed?) Australian cuisine, fueled by a surge in visits by skiers from Down Under. Some of the best finds are borne of passionate local restaurateurs and inventive young chefs, most of whom come for the same reasons you do: to revel in the two world-class winter sports resorts and 400 miles of summer trails in the surrounding Wasatch Range. 

If you were going to find a 100-year-old miner anywhere in Park City, it might be milling on the steps outside Riverhorse Provisions (riverhorseprovisions.com; 435-649-0799; 221 Main St.), which still flaunts the 1904 stone-and-wood facade of the onetime miner’s favorite Imperial Hotel. Linger with that hope for a minute, then shift up to the second-floor gourmet market and cafe for a coffee – from Caffe Ibis of Logan, Utah – followed by brisket hash (with polenta bites, poached egg, spinach and crispy jalapeño), breakfast poutine (cheese curds, red onion, fried egg and sausage gravy) or the top-selling spinach tortilla wrap, filled with sausage, cheddar chipotle cream and farm-fresh scrambled eggs. Riverhorse Provisions is the brainchild of Seth Adams, executive chef and co-owner of Riverhorse on Main, a fine-dining establishment a few blocks down Park City’s historic central street.  

The 50-seat dining room at the Silver Star Cafe (thesilverstarcafe.com; 435-655-3456; 1825 Three Kings Dr.) is like a really hip grandma’s kitchen, with weathered wood paneling, farmhouse shelving, exposed beams and a guitar (that anyone can play) hanging on the wall. The patio, steps from a ski lift and mountain bikers’ Armstrong Trail, affords views that stretch 25 miles to the Uinta Mountains. Owners Jeff and Lisa Ward, who met while waiting tables at the adjacent Deer Valley resort in the 1980s, opened the Silver Star Cafe in 2010 to nurture their love of food and music. (The evening slate from Thursday through Saturday is heavy on acoustic and jazz performers.) Top lunch choices include a burger crafted from a blend of brisket, short rib and hanger steak, pizza topped with whole clams and white sauce, and a seared trout salad on a bed of romaine, roasted corn, grape tomatoes, avocado and more. For accompaniment, audition the private-label tempranillo (some proceeds help a nonprofit organization that provides art therapy for kids), a Hop Rising double IPA by Salt Lake City brewer Squatters or a single-barrel bourbon from local distiller High West.  

You could probably eat light at the Farm (wapo.st/the-farm; 435-615-8080; 4000 Canyons Resort Dr.). That grain salad, I’m sure, is packed with locally grown finery. But here’s a better plan: Stroll past the hydroponic herb garden in the entranceway to either the refined-yet-rustic dining room (natural wood accents abound) or the patio yurt with views of the ski hill, and summon a margarita with Milagro Silver tequila and ginger-and-sage syrup. Next: a charcuterie board, featuring four varieties of salumi from Salt Lake City-based Creminelli Fine Meats, housemade red pepper relish and grilled bread. After a bowl of oxtail onion soup – from meat braised in veal stock for six hours – you’ll understand why the Farm, in Park City Canyons Village, was tagged as one of Utah’s 25 best restaurants. Relax: You’re not done yet. Round up with German chef Manny Rozehnal’s herbed spaetzle (truffle, caramelized onions, crispy shallots and black chanterelles), a Utah-raised red trout (rutabaga, green pepper, butternut squash and kale pesto) or lamb rack (curried Israeli couscous, golden raisins, tomato braised chickpea ragout and green onion). Rozehnal emphasizes local, humanely raised, and sustainable ingredients in his dishes, all cushioned by a 200-bottle wine list and an engaging, knowledgeable staff.  

– – –  

Briley is a writer based in Takoma Park, Maryland. His website is johnbriley.com.

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Best Amazon deals for Monday: Dyson vacuums, Echo Dot, and Anker power strips on sale

Happy Monday! There are some amazing Gold Box Deals on Amazon today for all your household, kitchen, skin and hair care, daily planning, and electronic needs. Start your week off right with these deals below.

Mayfair Linen has a good deal on 600 Thread Count 100% Cotton Sheets with 55% off in savings, while the Dyson V6 Origin Cordless Stick Vacuum is on sale for only $179.99. In the kitchen, HomeHero has 23% off on a 23-piece kitchen utensil set, while you can save 58% on pre-seasoned cast iron skillets from Cuisinel.

Arlo and Amazon partnered up to give new parents a good deal: when you buy a baby monitor from the former, you get a Fire HD Tablet for free.

Here’s the rundown on today’s best deals:

Stuff for the home

Rest easy with more than 50% off Mayfair Linen bedsheets.

Image: Mayfair Linen

Stuff for the kitchen

Save 58% on Cuisinel cast iron skillets

Image: Cuisinel

Calendars and planners

Plan all your upcoming events and appointments with Panda Planner

Image: Panda Planner

Skin and hair care tools

Save a whopping 87% on Crystal Clear Solutions products

Image: Crystal Clear Solutions 

Amazon devices on sale

Get a free Fire HD tablet from Amazon when you buy an Arlo Baby Monitor

Image: Arlo


Looking for more deals, the latest news on cool products, and other ways to upgrade your life? Sign up for the Mashable Deals newsletter here.


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Cook bacon on the grill with this simple tip

Get perfect bacon every time with this simple grilling trick.

 (iStock)

Sizzling and smoky, crispy yet tender…bacon is the best reason to wake up in the morning. But even if you’re a total boss at frying bacon or baking bacon indoors, all that oil and smoke makes it a bear to clean up after cooking.

Remember that enticing aroma that drew your entire family into the kitchen at the same time? Of course you do, because it’s still lingering, a subtle reminder it might be time to clean your dusty, greasy oven hood.

You can have your bacon—and a clean kitchen, too—with our easy, step-by-step instructions.

How to Make Bacon on the Grill

Bacon on the grill is everything you love about cooking bacon, minus your kitchen’s bacon hangover. But how? Turns out, there are many ways to grill bacon, but one method stands out above all others:

Use a cast-iron skillet.

Step 1: Heat things up.

Preheat your grill to 400°F. Place your cast iron skillet on the grates to preheat, too. (For any skillets that are old and rusty, do this first.)

Step 2: Place the strips down.

Lay the bacon out on the skillet, close the grill and let it cook for 7 to 10 minutes, depending on thickness.

Step 3: Flip!

Open the grill and use tongs to turn the bacon over. Cook for an additional 3 to 5 minutes or until golden and crispy. (Take a moment and be amazed at the color. It’s quite gorgeous and unlike stove-top bacon.)

Step 4: Enjoy.

Use tongs to place bacon on a plate lined with paper towels. Enjoy!

Why Other Methods Paled in Comparison

We tried them all, and none came close, although as with pizza, there’s really no such thing as “bad” bacon. (You can make pizza on the grill, too.) Even the worst is still awesome. But here’s a rundown of what happened with the other methods we tried:

Directly on the grill: First we laid out all the bacon and grilled the strips over direct heat. They were burnt to a crisp within two minutes. So next we tried indirect heat (we turned off the burners as soon as we laid out the bacon). After two minutes, they had lovely grill-marks but also some blackened spots. While this method works about as well as stove-top, it seems like an awful lot of work in a very short amount of time, with almost no room for error.

Hanging on the second shelf: Can you say “massive flareup?” Yeah, don’t bother trying this one.

On a skewer: Threading bacon on a skewer like a ribbon (and cooking directly on the grill) seemed a lovely idea. But the bacon cooked unevenly, alternating burnt spots and undercooked spots wherever the “ribbon” bent. If you do want to try it at home, be sure to place your bacon in the freezer for a few minutes before threading to make it easier to work with.

On a cooling rack: This was the second best method and certainly works if you don’t have a cast-iron skillet. To use this method, simply lay the bacon on the cooling rack, and turn off the heat as soon as you close the grill lid. Your bacon will be crispy in about two minutes.

On a baking sheet: This took about as long as the cast-iron method but produced chewier bacon. If you want to use a baking sheet, try placing a cooling rack on top of it for a crispier result.

On parchment paper: Parchment paper is essentially a thin, disposable, non-stick surface. But it burns at temperatures over 400°F, and grilling bacon can quickly raise the temperature in your grill above that, which means you end up with burnt paper.

Now that you’ve grilled up that bacon, here are 62 ways you might want to enjoy it!

This article originally appeared on Taste of Home.

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Where to eat breakfast, lunch and dinner in Park City, Utah – Longview News

In an old Utah mining town that has turned into a mountain resort, you would expect a healthy dose of burgers, skillets and other eat-and-get-back-out-there fare. Park City has all that. But thanks to relentless development and investment — including Vail Resorts’ 2014 acquisition of the local ski mountain — dining options run the international gamut, including tapas, sushi, nouveau American, Indian, Italian and (who would’ve guessed?) Australian cuisine, fueled by a surge in visits by skiers from Down Under. Some of the best finds are borne of passionate local restaurateurs and inventive young chefs, most of whom come for the same reasons you do: to revel in the two world-class winter sports resorts and 400 miles of summer trails in the surrounding Wasatch Range.

If you were going to find a 100-year-old miner anywhere in Park City, it might be milling on the steps outside Riverhorse Provisions (riverhorseprovisions.com; 435-649-0799; 221 Main St.), which still flaunts the 1904 stone-and-wood facade of the onetime miner’s favorite Imperial Hotel. Linger with that hope for a minute, then shift up to the second-floor gourmet market and cafe for a coffee — from Caffe Ibis of Logan, Utah — followed by brisket hash (with polenta bites, poached egg, spinach and crispy jalapeño), breakfast poutine (cheese curds, red onion, fried egg and sausage gravy) or the top-selling spinach tortilla wrap, filled with sausage, cheddar chipotle cream and farm-fresh scrambled eggs. Riverhorse Provisions is the brainchild of Seth Adams, executive chef and co-owner of Riverhorse on Main, a fine-dining establishment a few blocks down Park City’s historic central street.

The 50-seat dining room at the Silver Star Cafe (thesilverstarcafe.com; 435-655-3456; 1825 Three Kings Drive) is like a really hip grandma’s kitchen, with weathered wood paneling, farmhouse shelving, exposed beams and a guitar (that anyone can play) hanging on the wall. The patio, steps from a ski lift and mountain bikers’ Armstrong Trail, affords views that stretch 25 miles to the Uinta Mountains. Owners Jeff and Lisa Ward, who met while waiting tables at the adjacent Deer Valley resort in the 1980s, opened the Silver Star Cafe in 2010 to nurture their love of food and music. (The evening slate from Thursday through Saturday is heavy on acoustic and jazz performers.)

Top lunch choices include a burger crafted from a blend of brisket, short rib and hanger steak, pizza topped with whole clams and white sauce, and a seared trout salad on a bed of romaine, roasted corn, grape tomatoes, avocado and more. For accompaniment, audition the private-label tempranillo (some proceeds help a nonprofit organization that provides art therapy for kids), a Hop Rising double IPA by Salt Lake City brewer Squatters or a single-barrel bourbon from local distiller High West.

You could probably eat light at the Farm (wapo.st/the-farm; 435-615-8080; 4000 Canyons Resort Dr.). That grain salad, I’m sure, is packed with locally grown finery. But here’s a better plan: Stroll past the hydroponic herb garden in the entranceway to either the refined-yet-rustic dining room (natural wood accents abound) or the patio yurt with views of the ski hill, and summon a margarita with Milagro Silver tequila and ginger-and-sage syrup. Next: a charcuterie board, featuring four varieties of salumi from Salt Lake City-based Creminelli Fine Meats, housemade red pepper relish and grilled bread. After a bowl of oxtail onion soup — from meat braised in veal stock for six hours — you’ll understand why the Farm, in Park City Canyons Village, was tagged as one of Utah’s 25 best restaurants. Relax: You’re not done yet. Round up with German chef Manny Rozehnal’s herbed spaetzle (truffle, caramelized onions, crispy shallots and black chanterelles), a Utah-raised red trout (rutabaga, green pepper, butternut squash and kale pesto) or lamb rack (curried Israeli couscous, golden raisins, tomato braised chickpea ragout and green onion). Rozehnal emphasizes local, humanely raised, and sustainable ingredients in his dishes, all cushioned by a 200-bottle wine list and an engaging, knowledgeable staff.

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This 8-Inch Lodge Cast-Iron Skillet Is $11 Right Now


Today in Gear: Updates on The Outpost’s 2018 Events, Lightweight Adventure Trailers, Ebay’s First-Ever Sneaker Drop and More

Read here about The Outpost’s 2018 trade show events, some lightweight adventure trailers that don’t require a 4×4, Booker’s seasonal barbecue bourbon and so much more.

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