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Corning’s Cornflower line blossoms in value |

Corning’s Cornflower line blossoms in value

Q: This is a photo of Corningware stovetop coffee pot that I bought with green stamps in the 1970s. It stands 9 inches tall, makes nine cups of coffee and is decorated with the “Blue Cornflower” design. We hardly ever used it; it has been packed away for over 40 years.

What can you tell me about it?


A: Corning Glass Works was located in Corning, New York, from 1868 to 1998. It produced Corningware and Pyrex. In 1958, it introduced Corningware products that were resistant to thermal extremes. The “Blue Cornflower” design was the creation of designer Joseph Baum and became a favorite with consumers. It was available in a huge variety of pieces, including electric and stove top coffee percolators, pie plates, platters, tea pots, casseroles, butter dishes and skillets. Even though there were two recalls on the coffee percolators in the 1970s because the metal rims could come detached, they continue to be collectible. Collectors with concerns about their coffee pot being recalled can find answers on the internet.

Your circa-1970 stove top coffee percolator can be found selling online anywhere from $15 to $50.

Q: I have enclosed the mark that is on an old pottery vase that I bought at a tag sale 25 years ago. It was unusual, and I purchased it without having any knowledge of its background. The vase is 8 inches tall and has a swirled pattern in shades of blue, tan and cream. It is in mint condition.

I am downsizing and have to decide what to pitch and what to keep. Anything you can tell me about the maker, age and value will be greatly appreciated.

A: Niloak Pottery Co. made your art pottery vase. It was in business in Benton, Arkansas, from 1910 to 1947. Niloak used two to three different colors of clay that were placed on the potter’s wheel and then swirled into marbleized patterns known as “Mission Swirl.” It used kaolin, fine white clay that was native to Arkansas. Kaolin spelled backwards is niloak, thus the name. Most pieces were cream, blue and tan, but examples can also be found in green, pink and white.

Your vase was made sometime between 1910 and 1924. It would probably be worth $150 to $250.

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Category: Skillets  Tags: ,  Comments off
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