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Jennie Geisler: Nonstick cookware gets the heave-ho |

Jennie Geisler: Nonstick cookware gets the heave-ho

My scratched up nonstick saucepot will be pushing up daisies this spring.


I have some bad news, folks. Nonstick pots and pans, which seem so wonderful in so many ways, are really not our friends.

I’ve been wary of them for some time, having heard tidbits here and there, but I finally took my head out of the sand and did some real research. The reality is, while the makers of new ones claim that they’re safe, the coatings have always been a little risky when heated and the surfaces persnickety about their handling and care and, here’s the annoying thing: They don’t last forever no matter how much you baby them.

There are different price points for nonstick cookware, and slightly different chemicals applied in different ways. But the rules are all pretty much the same: No metal utensils or they’ll scratch. Don’t heat them up to 500 degrees because that vaporizes the coating. Don’t stack them in the cabinet or they’ll scratch. They will stop being nonstick and you’ll have to replace them.

Now, come on. Sure, a set of nonstick T-fals is fine for a college kid who has nothing else, assuming they’ll be replacing them, piece by piece with something that will last. 

Over last weekend, I finally gave my 16-year-old sauce pot the heave-hoe because the bottom was more silver than black. I rarely used it anymore, since I have three other pots – cast iron, stainless and enamel – that didn’t scare me. But sometimes I’d get a lot of things going at once and was desperate enough to pull out the “nonstick” Teflon-less pot and close my eyes until I couldn’t see the bottom beneath the food anymore.

I do have two nonstick skillets that can stay. John uses them to fry eggs and he does it so well, I don’t want to mess with his mojo. But finally, during an after-Christmas sale, I bought an inexpensive stainless Farberware 4-quart pot to replace old silver-bottomed T-Fal and stuck that puppy out with the garden potting equipment, where it should have gone a long, long ago.

Jennie Geisler can be reached at 870-1885 or by email at jennie.geisler@timesnews.com. Follow her on Twitter at twitter.com/ETNgeisler.

Category: Cookware Pots  Tags: ,  Comments off
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