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Made In Cookware is a home cook’s new best friend |

Made In Cookware is a home cook’s new best friend

Everyone seems to be a foodie these days: eating at the buzziest new restaurants, shopping at the most obscure farmers markets and scouring the internet for exciting, new recipes to try out at home.

But if you’re like most millennials, you’re probably cooking on some beat up pots and pans you’ve had since college.

Made In Cookware’s founders, Bradford “Chip” Malt and Jonathan “Jake” Kalick, decided to change all that.

With Malt’s background in science, tech and e-commerce and Kalick’s background in the food industry, the dynamic duo seemed destined to launch Made in Cookware together.

“My family wholesales cookware. For five years I was running the business that outfits everything for hotels, restaurants and casinos across the United States,” says Kalick.

“I was running e-commerce for an apparel company in NYC called Rhone,” adds Malt.

Essentially, the business model is a lot like most direct-to-consumer ventures out there, like Caspar for your mattresses and Brooklinen for your sheets. However, Made in Cookware has one unique difference.

“We are very different from a lot of direct-to-consumer companies because we control the entire supply chain,” Kalick says. “We go out and buy the nonstick coating, the aluminum for the middle of the pan, the stainless steel for the interior part of the pan. We source that and send it to our factory that creates the cookware.”

This means consumers can save a lot of money.

“Let’s say it costs $10 for a product to come out of the factory,” explains Malt. “The cost usually gets doubled from the factory to the wholesaler and then doubled again from the wholesaler to retailer. We’re able to cut that entire middle segment, so we don’t have that jump.”

And how about the quality of the pans? A lot of care went into their design process.

“Before we started, we interviewed 100 home chefs and asked them what they liked and didn’t like about their cookware,” Kalick reveals. “One thing that came up is that a lot of the premium competitor handles get extremely hot. So we designed a handle that’s hollow in the interior, dissipating heat so you won’t get burned.”

The pots and pans are also ergonomic and stackable, for those of us with limited cabinet space in cramped city apartments.

What’s more, if you have a fancy induction stove, Made In Cookware is designed for those as well.

“The induction burners are magnetic instead of electric or gas. There’s a nickel content in our pots and pans that allow them to be induction compatible,” Malt explains.

There are 12 different products currently offered by Made in Cookware, and can be purchased a la carte or in a kit.

À la Carte:

Stainless Steel Frying Pans: $59-$85 (8”, 10’’, 12’’)

Non-stick Frying Pans: $69-$95 (8.5”, 10.5’’, 12’’)

Sauce Pans: $69-$79 (2QT, 3QT)

Sauté Pan: $119 (4QT)

Stock Pots: $99-$139 (5QT, 8QT)

Saucier: $85


Fry Family: $199
(8.5” 12” Fry Pan, 10.5” Non-Stick Fry Pan)

The Starter: $249
(10” Stainless Steel Fry Pan, 2 QT Sauce Pan with Lid, 5 QT Stock Pot with Lid)

The Core: $419
(10” Fry Pan, 10” Non-Stick Fry Pan, 2 QT Sauce Pan with Lid, 8 QT Stock Pot with Lid, 4 QT Saute Pan)

Kitchen Sink: $549
(10” Fry Pan, 10” Non-Stick Fry Pan, 12” Fry Pan, 2 QT Sauce Pan, 3 QT Sauce Pan, 8 QT Stock Pot, 4 QT Saute Pan)

For more information, visit:

Category: Cookware Pots  Tags: ,  Comments off
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