site stats
Cookware pans, pots & pans, pans: Choose the Best Cookware Pans for You! - Part 2

Blog Archives

Greenville celebrates Annie Oakley with a bang, bang: Ohio’s Tiny …

GREENVILLE, Ohio – Annie Oakley’s statue looks over the southwestern Ohio working class town she called home more than a century ago and today where teen-aged girls compete in sharpshooting contests in a festival that has been held for 55 years.

The Annie Oakley Festival is just one of two festivals on the weekend of July 27 through 29 to honor the town’s legacy. The other is the more sedate Gathering at the Garst, on the grounds of Darke County’s Garst Museum on North Broadway, which focuses on the history of Greenville and its role in opening up the American Midwest for settlement. 

Jesse Peters demonstrates his shooting skill while on horseback. He will be one of dozens of riders that will participate in events at the Annie Oakley Festival. (Courtesy Jesse Peters) 

And while the festivals draw tens of thousands of visitors every year, those who come also discover beautiful parks, a museum of Ohio history and a tiny restaurant that makes a unique sandwich.

The Oakley festival begins July 24 with practice for the Miss Annie Oakley shooting competition. Young women, ages 14 to 19, dress in costumes of the day and compete for the title of Miss Annie Oakley, shooting BB rifles at balloons. 

Ira McDaniel, 17, the reigning Miss Annie Oakley for a few more weeks until the next sharpshooter is selected. (Courtesy Annie Oakley Festival) 

This year, after a parade down Broadway, an historical marker will be placed at the house at 225 E. Third St., where Annie Oakley was visiting when she died of “pernicious anemia.” Historians believe she actually died of lead poisoning from a lifetime of handling ammunition in hundreds of skill shooting performances.

July 28 and 29, there will be free bus trips to Annie Oakley’s birthplace, childhood home and her grave, located a few miles outside the city, and other important Annie Oakley sites. 

Gathering at the Garst

The Gathering at the Garst focuses more on Greenville’s history, including reenactments of the signing of the “Treaty of Greene Ville” in 1795 by General “Mad” Anthony Way and the leaders of 12 Native American tribes.

Later, Fort Green Ville closed and gave way to the modern community. The land that once housed the fort is now downtown Greenville.

The treaty assured the Native Americans their own land and assured settlers that it was safe to settle the Midwest. But the museum also has a display that shows how that treaty and others were later broken by the American government.

Eileen Litchfield, president of the Annie Oakley Foundation, said officials have discussed combining the two festivals. 

But, she said: “We offer very different events at each festival.They are not really in competition.”

A quiet town

Greenville Police Lt. Eric Roberts said the city is relatively quiet. There has not been a homicide there for eight years.

In 2016, there were 12,836 residents in the city that measures 6.6 square miles.  The population is mostly white with a small number of African-American residents, some whose ancestors fought in the Civil War and were given land grants for their service. There are also few Amish families in and around the city.

Located near Dayton and 239 miles south of Cleveland, Greenville is a peaceful town with a thriving Main Street and a love of its local sports teams, which does not prevent people from joking about them.

“If there is ever a tornado warning here people rush to the high school football field,” deadpanned Roberts. “There hasn’t been a touchdown there in years.” 

Annie Oakley, favorite daughter

Annie Oakley was born in Darke County, just outside of town, and died while visiting relatives in Greenville, the city she called home.

Before her death in 1926, Oakley traveled the world as part of Buffalo Bill’s Wild West Show with her husband and fellow sharpshooter, Frank Butler. She met kings and queens and royalty of many nations, but she never forgot Greenville, and the city has never forgotten her.

Annie only stood five feet tall, but her memory casts a giant shadow to this day. Her statue, with rifle in hand, welcomes visitors and her presence is nearly everywhere.

In 1860 she was born Phoebe Ann Moses, or Mosey depending on which relative or expert you talk to. Her grave in the Burke Cemetery north of town attracts thousands of visitors each year. Her husband, who died just weeks after his wife, is buried beside her.

Oakley has an entire wing of the Garst Museum full of memorabilia including a kinetoscope created in 1894 of her shooting demonstration created by by fellow Ohioan Thomas Edison. It was the second kinetoscope, the forerunner of the motion picture, ever created. Admission to the museum is free.

Bear’s Mill

Another thing to see in the area is Bear’s Mill, a working, water-powered, grist mill that was built in 1849 at 6450 Arcanum Bears Mill Road in Greenville Township, just east of downtown. Annie Oakley’s father, Jacob, died in 1866 while trying to make it back home from getting winter supplies at the mill. Today, the mill features demonstrations, an art gallery and presentations by people wearing traditional garb.

Quick draw artist

Everyone in Greenville knows that no one is faster on the draw than Harry Ballengee, even at the age of 82.

Ballengee is a quick draw artist who will demonstrate his skill as he competes with other fast guns from around the country at the Annie Oakley Festival.

How fast is he?

“I’ve been clocked at one-third of second,” he said. “I’m fast, but not the fastest. There is a guy who pulls at one-fourth of a second. I’ve won my share of competitions though. There will be about 20 of us at the festival, we’re always competing against one another.”

He shoots a modified Ruger .357 Blackhawk that fires wax bullets.

Ballengee grew up watching westerns on television — “Gunsmoke,” “Hopalong Cassidy” — he draws like they did, western style. 

“We have to hit a target of course, and are penalized if we miss it no matter how fast we draw,” he said. “We have a measuring device that records the speed of our draw to the thousandth of a second.”

Ballengee has been shooting professionally for 45 years, more than half his life, and he’s good at it.

He said he has no desire to shoot anyone, but he feels like he was born more than a century too late.

“I think I would have enjoyed life way back then,” he mused. “But I would really miss electricity.”

KitchenAid sale

KitchenAid is a major force in the city. With 1,300 workers, the factory east of downtown is the city’s biggest employer. During festival weekend, downtown turns into a giant sidewalk sale, with the KitchenAid Appliance store leading the way.

People line up the day before outside the store, the only KitchenAid store in the world, for gifts, prizes and heavy discounts. They can also see the KitchenAid museum in the basement. It includes the first mixer ever sold by KitchenAid (then Hobart) in 1924. They expect more than 30,000 shoppers over the weekend.

Maid-Rite, a unique treat

Don’t let the thousands of pieces of chewed gum on the side of the  Maid-Rite Sandwich Shop throw you off.

The restaurant, 125 N. Broadway, which opened in 1934, serves a unique sandwich. It is made of finely ground beef from locally produced beef and is prepared with a carefully guarded recipe of herbs. It is served with pickles, mustard and cheese for $2.05. Add ham for a Big Jim.

The menu does not go much beyond that. The only other sandwiches offered are a ham and cheese, chicken salad and egg salad sandwiches.

Not that they need much else. The sandwich is so popular that the restaurant is almost always full and there is a line of cars at the drive-thru window.

“I’ve been coming here since I was a little kid,” said Cheryl Clouse, 70, of Ansonia. “We didn’t have much money, but my dad would stop here and buy all four of the kids Maid-Rites, he could afford that.”

And the gum on the wall? 

Part-owner Steve Canter said no one is quite sure why or how it started.

“We know it started in the early forties, after that people just kept on doing it,” he said. “I scrape it off now and then, no one seems to notice.”

If You Go:

The Annie Oakley and the Gathering at the Garst festivals take place July 27, 28 and 29 in Greenville, located 33 miles north of Dayton. Both are free.

The Annie Oakley Festival is at the at the Darke County Fairgrounds. The Gathering at the Garst is at the Garst Museum in downtown Greenville.

The Oakley festival will feature horse riding, shooting contests, bullwhip demonstrations and numerous food and souvenir vendors.

The Garst festival will have historic reenactments and Native Americans demonstrating their ancient and modern foods, music and culture. It will have an art exhibit and contest and also feature live bands.

Category: Kitchenaid  Tags: ,  Comments off

Designer Misha Zadeh Enters Tabletop Category

Designer Misha Zadeh has entered the tabletop category with a new licensed collection of tableware.

The collection includes Zadeh’s trademark bold and colorful designs in ceramics and melamine, featuring her original watercolor artwork. The collection includes dinnerware, serveware and drinkware items.

Zadeh began as a freelance graphic design business, Turquoise Creative, and soon ventured into the newly emerging indie stationery world. Since then, the company has been rebranded as Misha Zadeh Illustration Design, under which the new tabletop line was launched.

The new line was officially launched at this year’s January Atlanta Market and designed exclusively for retailer 180 degrees. The collection shipped to other retailers in May.

Category: Dinnerware  Tags: ,  Comments off

Greenville celebrates Annie Oakley with a bang, bang: Ohio’s Tiny Towns

GREENVILLE, Ohio – Annie Oakley’s statue looks over the southwestern Ohio working class town she called home more than a century ago and today where teen-aged girls compete in sharpshooting contests in a festival that has been held for 55 years.

The Annie Oakley Festival is just one of two festivals on the weekend of July 27 through 29 to honor the town’s legacy. The other is the more sedate Gathering at the Garst, on the grounds of Darke County’s Garst Museum on North Broadway, which focuses on the history of Greenville and its role in opening up the American Midwest for settlement. 

Jesse Peters demonstrates his shooting skill while on horseback. He will be one of dozens of riders that will participate in events at the Annie Oakley Festival. (Courtesy Jesse Peters) 

And while the festivals draw tens of thousands of visitors every year, those who come also discover beautiful parks, a museum of Ohio history and a tiny restaurant that makes a unique sandwich.

The Oakley festival begins July 24 with practice for the Miss Annie Oakley shooting competition. Young women, ages 14 to 19, dress in costumes of the day and compete for the title of Miss Annie Oakley, shooting BB rifles at balloons. 

Ira McDaniel, 17, the reigning Miss Annie Oakley for a few more weeks until the next sharpshooter is selected. (Courtesy Annie Oakley Festival) 

This year, after a parade down Broadway, an historical marker will be placed at the house at 225 E. Third St., where Annie Oakley was visiting when she died of “pernicious anemia.” Historians believe she actually died of lead poisoning from a lifetime of handling ammunition in hundreds of skill shooting performances.

July 28 and 29, there will be free bus trips to Annie Oakley’s birthplace, childhood home and her grave, located a few miles outside the city, and other important Annie Oakley sites. 

Gathering at the Garst

The Gathering at the Garst focuses more on Greenville’s history, including reenactments of the signing of the “Treaty of Greene Ville” in 1795 by General “Mad” Anthony Way and the leaders of 12 Native American tribes.

Later, Fort Green Ville closed and gave way to the modern community. The land that once housed the fort is now downtown Greenville.

The treaty assured the Native Americans their own land and assured settlers that it was safe to settle the Midwest. But the museum also has a display that shows how that treaty and others were later broken by the American government.

Eileen Litchfield, president of the Annie Oakley Foundation, said officials have discussed combining the two festivals. 

But, she said: “We offer very different events at each festival.They are not really in competition.”

A quiet town

Greenville Police Lt. Eric Roberts said the city is relatively quiet. There has not been a homicide there for eight years.

In 2016, there were 12,836 residents in the city that measures 6.6 square miles.  The population is mostly white with a small number of African-American residents, some whose ancestors fought in the Civil War and were given land grants for their service. There are also few Amish families in and around the city.

Located near Dayton and 239 miles south of Cleveland, Greenville is a peaceful town with a thriving Main Street and a love of its local sports teams, which does not prevent people from joking about them.

“If there is ever a tornado warning here people rush to the high school football field,” deadpanned Roberts. “There hasn’t been a touchdown there in years.” 

Annie Oakley, favorite daughter

Annie Oakley was born in Darke County, just outside of town, and died while visiting relatives in Greenville, the city she called home.

Before her death in 1926, Oakley traveled the world as part of Buffalo Bill’s Wild West Show with her husband and fellow sharpshooter, Frank Butler. She met kings and queens and royalty of many nations, but she never forgot Greenville, and the city has never forgotten her.

Annie only stood five feet tall, but her memory casts a giant shadow to this day. Her statue, with rifle in hand, welcomes visitors and her presence is nearly everywhere.

In 1860 she was born Phoebe Ann Moses, or Mosey depending on which relative or expert you talk to. Her grave in the Burke Cemetery north of town attracts thousands of visitors each year. Her husband, who died just weeks after his wife, is buried beside her.

Oakley has an entire wing of the Garst Museum full of memorabilia including a kinetoscope created in 1894 of her shooting demonstration created by by fellow Ohioan Thomas Edison. It was the second kinetoscope, the forerunner of the motion picture, ever created. Admission to the museum is free.

Bear’s Mill

Another thing to see in the area is Bear’s Mill, a working, water-powered, grist mill that was built in 1849 at 6450 Arcanum Bears Mill Road in Greenville Township, just east of downtown. Annie Oakley’s father, Jacob, died in 1866 while trying to make it back home from getting winter supplies at the mill. Today, the mill features demonstrations, an art gallery and presentations by people wearing traditional garb.

Quick draw artist

Everyone in Greenville knows that no one is faster on the draw than Harry Ballengee, even at the age of 82.

Ballengee is a quick draw artist who will demonstrate his skill as he competes with other fast guns from around the country at the Annie Oakley Festival.

How fast is he?

“I’ve been clocked at one-third of second,” he said. “I’m fast, but not the fastest. There is a guy who pulls at one-fourth of a second. I’ve won my share of competitions though. There will be about 20 of us at the festival, we’re always competing against one another.”

He shoots a modified Ruger .357 Blackhawk that fires wax bullets.

Ballengee grew up watching westerns on television — “Gunsmoke,” “Hopalong Cassidy” — he draws like they did, western style. 

“We have to hit a target of course, and are penalized if we miss it no matter how fast we draw,” he said. “We have a measuring device that records the speed of our draw to the thousandth of a second.”

Ballengee has been shooting professionally for 45 years, more than half his life, and he’s good at it.

He said he has no desire to shoot anyone, but he feels like he was born more than a century too late.

“I think I would have enjoyed life way back then,” he mused. “But I would really miss electricity.”

KitchenAid sale

KitchenAid is a major force in the city. With 1,300 workers, the factory east of downtown is the city’s biggest employer. During festival weekend, downtown turns into a giant sidewalk sale, with the KitchenAid Appliance store leading the way.

People line up the day before outside the store, the only KitchenAid store in the world, for gifts, prizes and heavy discounts. They can also see the KitchenAid museum in the basement. It includes the first mixer ever sold by KitchenAid (then Hobart) in 1924. They expect more than 30,000 shoppers over the weekend.

Maid-Rite, a unique treat

Don’t let the thousands of pieces of chewed gum on the side of the  Maid-Rite Sandwich Shop throw you off.

The restaurant, 125 N. Broadway, which opened in 1934, serves a unique sandwich. It is made of finely ground beef from locally produced beef and is prepared with a carefully guarded recipe of herbs. It is served with pickles, mustard and cheese for $2.05. Add ham for a Big Jim.

The menu does not go much beyond that. The only other sandwiches offered are a ham and cheese, chicken salad and egg salad sandwiches.

Not that they need much else. The sandwich is so popular that the restaurant is almost always full and there is a line of cars at the drive-thru window.

“I’ve been coming here since I was a little kid,” said Cheryl Clouse, 70, of Ansonia. “We didn’t have much money, but my dad would stop here and buy all four of the kids Maid-Rites, he could afford that.”

And the gum on the wall? 

Part-owner Steve Canter said no one is quite sure why or how it started.

“We know it started in the early forties, after that people just kept on doing it,” he said. “I scrape it off now and then, no one seems to notice.”

If You Go:

The Annie Oakley and the Gathering at the Garst festivals take place July 27, 28 and 29 in Greenville, located 33 miles north of Dayton. Both are free.

The Annie Oakley Festival is at the at the Darke County Fairgrounds. The Gathering at the Garst is at the Garst Museum in downtown Greenville.

The Oakley festival will feature horse riding, shooting contests, bullwhip demonstrations and numerous food and souvenir vendors.

The Garst festival will have historic reenactments and Native Americans demonstrating their ancient and modern foods, music and culture. It will have an art exhibit and contest and also feature live bands.

Category: Kitchenaid  Tags: ,  Comments off

Chef talk: Dennis Grubb of Hilltop Restaurant in Spencer – The Herald

‘+

‘+__tnt.truncateStr(oAsset.title,85,’…’)+’

‘+

‘+

Category: Skillets  Tags: ,  Comments off

The best Prime Day sales not happening at Amazon: Deals at eBay, GameStop, Newegg, Lowe’s and more

Millions of Amazon’s enthusiasts are set to once again celebrate Prime Day, which kicks off this year on Monday, July 16. But, like last year, a bunch of other retailers will elbow in with their own online sales on July 16 and 17. So far, eBay, Newegg, GameStop and Lowe’s have announced their intentions, and we expect this list to continue to grow.

Here are the alternative Prime Day sales we’ve heard about so far. We’ll continue to add to the list as new ones appear.

Disclaimer: CNET may get a share of revenue from the sale of the products featured on this page.

eBay

eBay has announced plans to reveal “thousands of exclusive deals with free shipping” beginning on Monday, July 16 — the very date on which Prime Day falls this year. In contrast to Amazon’s fourth annual sales bonanza, which is available only to Prime members, eBay’s deals will be available to everyone. eBay says it will offer discounts on electronics, home goods, fashion and sports equipment from brands including Apple, Samsung, Adidas, Dyson and KitchenAid. And when you spend $119 or more, eBay will throw in a free Google Home Mini when you use the promo code PMINI4FREE at checkout (more info here).



eBay

Shop on eBay

Newegg

Ignore the groan-inducing name of Newegg’s mid-July sale (“FantasTech”), there are actually some good deals to be had. The “pre-sale” is already in motion, and here’s how Newegg is ramping things up over the course of the week (straight from the company’s promotional email): 

July 11: Save up to 75% on Select Rosewill products, from gaming accessories to small home appliances

July 12: Save up to $400 on Select ABS gaming machines

July 13: Buy a $150 Newegg Gift Card and get a free $20 Newegg Promo Gift Card

July 14 15: Open a Newegg Store Credit Card and get a $50 statement credit (new accounts only)

July 16: from midnight to 11:59 a.m. (PT), shop early-access FantasTech deals, with new deals unlocked every two hours

Once the real sale starts, for instance, you can score the Acer Aspire 5 15-inch laptop for just under $500. That’s $200 off its list price, and $100 less than the similar (and CNET budget favorite) Acer Aspire E15 selling at Amazon right now.

Shop Newegg FantasTech sale

GameStop

If you’re looking for new games for your PS4, Xbox One, Switch or PC, GameStop’s Game Days Summer Sale is happening now through July 15, with prices on select titles slashed up to 50 percent. Now, you’ll want to compare prices with Amazon and others: At $30, Monster Hunter World is no cheaper than it is at Amazon, for instance. But Mario + Rabbids Kingdom Battle (Switch) for $30 soundly beats Amazon’s $45 price. And the digital version of Red Dead Redemption — which is 4K optimized on the Xbox One X — is a downright steal at $10 (versus $20 to $25 for the disc on Amazon).

Shop GameStop’s Game Days

Whole Foods

A reminder to those of you who’ve been living under a rock for the past year: Whole Foods is now a fully owned subsidiary of Amazon. And as such, Prime Day is extending into the real-world grocery aisle this year. From July 11 through July 17, Prime members will get a $10 account credit on Amazon for Prime Day when they spend that same amount at Whole Foods Market. Meanwhile, Rewards Visa cardholders with Prime membership will get 10 percent back on up to a total of $400 from July 14 to July 17. In addition, Prime members who are trying the delivery feature from Whole Foods Market stores via Prime Now will receive $10 off their order when they shop before July 17, and can get $10 to use toward a future order.

Lowe’s

Lowe’s will launch an array of new deals at on July 16 at midnight ET. The discounts will be available exclusively online and most will feature tools — but there will be a handful of worthwhile promotions on smart home products and electronics. Members of the My Lowe’s loyalty program will get an additional 10 percent off their order. A few highlights:

Samsung Connect Home Smart WiFi system (3-pack) — $100 (save $200)

Lyrics Wifi Cam 2 — $128 (save $42)

OmniMount Wall TV Mount — $20 (save $30

Spend $150 or more and get a free Google Home Mini

Shop at Lowe’s

Originally published 10:44 p.m. PT, July 11.
Update, 7:30 a.m. PT, July 12: Added details about Lowe’s promotions and eBay’s free Google Home Mini offer.

Prime Day 2018: The best deals so far — and everything else you need to know

Prime Day 2018: CNET’s complete coverage 

Category: Kitchenaid  Tags: ,  Comments off

5 places for great macaroni and cheese in the Buffalo area – The …

Consider it National Comfort Food Weekend.

After local media made a big deal Friday about National French Fry Day, it felt cheap to shortchange National Macaroni and Cheese Day, pegged for July 14.

Just like french fries, macaroni and cheese served by restaurants is often judged on a pedestal. Anyone with a hint of culinary prowess can prepare Kraft Macaroni Cheese, which means that, if you’re going out to eat, the dish had better be elevated well beyond the boxed version.

Fortunately, there are several restaurants in the Buffalo area where spending more than $4 on macaroni and cheese isn’t a nightmarish decision. Here’s a look:

*Colter Bay

561 Delaware Ave.

The dish: Mac ‘n Cheese, $12, featured image, extra-sharp cheddar cheese, applewood-smoked bacon, caramelized onions, potato chip crust, elbow noodles.

The verdict: Colter’s macaroni and cheese can pass as a meal despite its listing as an appetizer; the dish starred in Andrew Galarneau’s dining review of the Allentown restaurant, in which he calls the rich, gooey and cheesy concoction a “must-try for mac-and-cheese mavens.” Sharon Cantillon’s image at the top speaks for itself, though.

*****

*Ballyhoo

211 South Park Ave.

The dish: “Pasta,” $4, as a side at Ballyhoo, or at Lucky Day (320 Pearl St.), listed as Ballyhoo Mac and Cheese, for $7. The fact that it’s no-frills, just-really-good mac and cheese is even more exciting.

The verdict: Unquestionably my favorite macaroni and cheese in Buffalo, and it’s available at two different spots, thanks to the second project of owners Tim and Morgan Stevens. It foregoes many of the extra ingredients in favor of al dente shells, an appropriate amount of cheese (with Parmesan on top) and a heat level that keeps it from becoming boring.

*****

*Mooney’s Sports Bar

Six different locations in the Buffalo area – all listed here.

The dish: Sixteen or more varieties, including stuffed banana pepper, Stinger, Rodeo, pizza, Three Pigs and beef on weck. A “side” size runs from $8.49 to $10.49, while a whole spans between $11.99 and $14.99.

The verdict: It’s rich, dense, customizable and there’s a lot of it. Take the Stinger version, with chopped steak, chopped chicken fingers, crumbled blue cheese and hot sauce blended with their mac and cheese, topped with panko. Unless you have an otherworldly appetite, there will be enough left over for a second meal (and it reheats decently).

The Rodeo Mac and Cheese from Mooney’s in Kenmore. (Ben Tsujimoto/News file photo)

*****

*SEAR

200 Delaware Ave.

The dish: Lobster mac and cheese, $16 as a side, but it’s blessed with lobster, so it’s not like it would be $4.

The verdict: Macaroni and cheese on the menu at a fancy steakhouse? You bet, and it meets Sear’s standard. Generous chunks of lobster, the welcomed crunch of panko and properly cooked (and impressively sized) elbows combine in this luxurious dish, one recommended by Galarneau at the Taste of Buffalo last weekend.

Sear’s lobster macaroni and cheese. (Sharon Cantillon/News file photo)

*****

*Fat Bob’s Smokehouse

41 Virginia Place.

The dish: $3.99 as a side, $4.99 for gluten-free mac, $9.99 for a full entree size, then four different varieties, including Buffalo chicken, from $11.99 to $13.99. Full menu.

The verdict: Fat Bob’s knows its macaroni and cheese is beloved, trumpeting it at local events such as the Buffalo Zoo’s Polar Bites and offering almost every size imaginable (except bucket-sized) on its menu. Its reputation has been built up to such an extent that it almost feels overrated.

As you can see from the image below, Fat Bob’s approach is a little different – penne replaces traditional elbows, while the visible black pepper juts out from the creaminess.

Fat Bob’s macaroni and cheese has long been considered one of Buffalo’s best. (Robert Kirkham/News file photo)

*Rest in cheesy peace: The macaroni and cheese skillets from the previous iteration of The Place on Lexington Avenue. There’s just something satisfying about enjoying a comfort food out of a warm skillet. [Update: Those skillets still exist at the new iteration of the Place. I’ll withhold further judgment until I try them.]

Email: btsujimoto@buffnews.com, especially if he disturbingly left off your favorite macaroni and cheese from the list.

More best-of-Buffalo comfort food roundups to check out as dinnertime approaches:

10 great french fry spots around Buffalo

Seven Buffalo-area burgers to flip over

10 new Buffalo-area restaurants to try this summer

Ten pizzas worth the dough

Buffalo doughnuts: Beloved in all shapes and sizes

Category: Skillets  Tags: ,  Comments off

5 places for great macaroni and cheese in the Buffalo area

Consider it National Comfort Food Weekend.

After local media made a big deal Friday about National French Fry Day, it felt cheap to shortchange National Macaroni and Cheese Day, pegged for July 14.

Just like french fries, macaroni and cheese served by restaurants is often judged on a pedestal. Anyone with a hint of culinary prowess can prepare Kraft Macaroni Cheese, which means that, if you’re going out to eat, the dish had better be elevated well beyond the boxed version.

Fortunately, there are several restaurants in the Buffalo area where spending more than $4 on macaroni and cheese isn’t a nightmarish decision. Here’s a look:

*Colter Bay

561 Delaware Ave.

The dish: Mac ‘n Cheese, $12, featured image, extra-sharp cheddar cheese, applewood-smoked bacon, caramelized onions, potato chip crust, elbow noodles.

The verdict: Colter’s macaroni and cheese can pass as a meal despite its listing as an appetizer; the dish starred in Andrew Galarneau’s dining review of the Allentown restaurant, in which he calls the rich, gooey and cheesy concoction a “must-try for mac-and-cheese mavens.” Sharon Cantillon’s image at the top speaks for itself, though.

*****

*Ballyhoo

211 South Park Ave.

The dish: “Pasta,” $4, as a side at Ballyhoo, or at Lucky Day (320 Pearl St.), listed as Ballyhoo Mac and Cheese, for $7. The fact that it’s no-frills, just-really-good mac and cheese is even more exciting.

The verdict: Unquestionably my favorite macaroni and cheese in Buffalo, and it’s available at two different spots, thanks to the second project of owners Tim and Morgan Stevens. It foregoes many of the extra ingredients in favor of al dente shells, an appropriate amount of cheese (with Parmesan on top) and a heat level that keeps it from becoming boring.

*****

*Mooney’s Sports Bar

Six different locations in the Buffalo area – all listed here.

The dish: Sixteen or more varieties, including stuffed banana pepper, Stinger, Rodeo, pizza, Three Pigs and beef on weck. A “side” size runs from $8.49 to $10.49, while a whole spans between $11.99 and $14.99.

The verdict: It’s rich, dense, customizable and there’s a lot of it. Take the Stinger version, with chopped steak, chopped chicken fingers, crumbled blue cheese and hot sauce blended with their mac and cheese, topped with panko. Unless you have an otherworldly appetite, there will be enough left over for a second meal (and it reheats decently).

The Rodeo Mac and Cheese from Mooney’s in Kenmore. (Ben Tsujimoto/News file photo)

*****

*SEAR

200 Delaware Ave.

The dish: Lobster mac and cheese, $16 as a side, but it’s blessed with lobster, so it’s not like it would be $4.

The verdict: Macaroni and cheese on the menu at a fancy steakhouse? You bet, and it meets Sear’s standard. Generous chunks of lobster, the welcomed crunch of panko and properly cooked (and impressively sized) elbows combine in this luxurious dish, one recommended by Galarneau at the Taste of Buffalo last weekend.

Sear’s lobster macaroni and cheese. (Sharon Cantillon/News file photo)

*****

*Fat Bob’s Smokehouse

41 Virginia Place.

The dish: $3.99 as a side, $4.99 for gluten-free mac, $9.99 for a full entree size, then four different varieties, including Buffalo chicken, from $11.99 to $13.99. Full menu.

The verdict: Fat Bob’s knows its macaroni and cheese is beloved, trumpeting it at local events such as the Buffalo Zoo’s Polar Bites and offering almost every size imaginable (except bucket-sized) on its menu. Its reputation has been built up to such an extent that it almost feels overrated.

As you can see from the image below, Fat Bob’s approach is a little different – penne replaces traditional elbows, while the visible black pepper juts out from the creaminess.

Fat Bob’s macaroni and cheese has long been considered one of Buffalo’s best. (Robert Kirkham/News file photo)

*Rest in cheesy peace: The macaroni and cheese skillets from the previous iteration of The Place on Lexington Avenue. There’s just something satisfying about enjoying a comfort food out of a warm skillet. [Update: Those skillets still exist at the new iteration of the Place. I’ll withhold further judgment until I try them.]

Email: btsujimoto@buffnews.com, especially if he disturbingly left off your favorite macaroni and cheese from the list.

Category: Skillets  Tags: ,  Comments off