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Rabbi Jordan Goldson, Beth Warren preach joys of downtown in simple, spacious Baton Rouge apartment

Rabbi Jordan Goldson and Beth Warren chose a downtown apartment for their new life together after they were married in January.

“We wanted to keep it simple,” said Goldson, spiritual leader of Congregation B’nai Israel since 2009.

“I’m a New Yorker,” added Warren, who moved to Baton Rouge in March. “I am used to apartment living.”

The couple leased a 1,700-square-foot loft on the eighth floor of a building on a downtown corner. Known for open spaces, high ceilings, concrete floors and exposed support beams, lofts are often found in converted commercial or industrial buildings like the Commerce Building, which was developed as an office building in 1955 by the late Wilbur Marvin, a longtime member of B’nai Israel. It was recently converted into 93 loft apartments. 

The newlyweds selected their apartment for the security, open spaces, breathtaking views of the Mississippi River and its size.

“I work from home,” said Warren, senior vice president of planning and design for a retail technology company. “I need a large space for work.”

Can’t see the video below? Click here

Because they share a car, Goldson and Warren like being close to so much activity. They are regulars at the farmers’ market, the Shaw Center for the Arts, downtown restaurants and the area’s museums. They love to walk on the levee and explore the local neighborhoods like Spanish Town. He loves to watch the barges working on the river.

“We have a little flavor of urban life,” Warren said. “The building is young with lots of professionals.”

The apartment opens to a hall off of which are two bedrooms, Warren’s office and the master bedroom. The hall leads to the large kitchen/dining room with a private patio balcony on the left. Behind the modern kitchen is the living room, decorated in grey, black and white with pops of color from the couple’s art and accessories. It’s a mix of mid century, old and new furniture.

“We combined our lives,” Warren said. “We have taken things from all of our lives, from the states and countries where we have lived.”

Although Warren brought much of the art with her from New York, the couple has collected some colorful local pieces, which balance the neutral backdrop of the natural concrete floors. The spaces are brightened with area rugs used throughout the apartment.

Because Warren lived in apartments for many years, she learned to collect only those things that have real meaning to her, like a sculpture of a brownstone, a wedding gift from friends. It’s on display on a marble column from Goldson’s grandmother. Another favorite piece is a fruitwood chest that also belonged to his grandmother.

“We are constantly changing things,” she said, “but we are decisive. When something new comes in, we have to give up something. We cycle though things, but we don’t throw them away. We donate them to people in need.”

One of their favorite things about the building is the rooftop patio with a pool, barbecue area and cabana with a television. It’s a busy gathering place, especially on the weekends. There are even plans for a rooftop restaurant in the future.

Goldson and Warren hope that downtown will continue to grow, especially with more retail.

“It’s not New York, but we think the downtown is ready for it,” Goldson said. “A lot is still experimental, but we are hoping more and more people will frequent the life here. We chose downtown because we wanted to be a part of the new emerging community.” 

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Eddie Lampert Makes More Smart Brand Deals for Sears Holdings …

The deals CEO Eddie Lampert has made for Sears Holdings Corp (NASDAQ:SHLD) in 2017 show what a crying shame it is he wasn’t as innovative earlier.

Sears recently announced two more deals for its Kenmore and DieHard brands, partnering with Cleva North America to produce Kenmore vacuums that will be sold at third-party stores and teaming up with Dorcy to make DieHard brand alkaline batteries. Coupled with the other major partnerships and deals struck earlier this year, had Lampert thought as creatively a few years ago, Sears might be a much more successful business today instead of one clinging by its fingertips to survive.

As great as these deals are, it may simply be a case of too little, too late.

A pile of alkaline batteries

Image source: Getty Images.

More brand extensions

Look at the deals Lampert made. In the case of Cleva, it will manufacture Kenmore and Kenmore Elite vacuums for distribution at retailers around the world, covering products from upright vacuums, stick vacuums, hand vacuums, and robotic vacuums to carpet cleaners, bare-floor cleaners, sweepers, and accessories.

With LED flashlight maker Dorcy, the DieHard deal will extend the car battery brand to other types of batteries as well as DieHard-branded flashlights. It’s almost a no-brainer and is very similar to Lampert’s decision to brand Sears’ auto service centers under the DieHard name. The Dorcy partnership will see DieHard batteries distributed in the U.S. and around the world through third-party retailers.

Lampert seems to have finally realized what it takes to save the company that he’s admirably sunk so much of his own money into, but it also comes with the understanding that Sears and Kmart are not the vehicles to do it.

DieHard auto service center

Image source: Sears Holdings.

Is Sears a licensing play?

The light bulb seemed to turn on earlier this year when Lampert first agreed to allow other companies to start selling Sears’ well-known brands. Customers just aren’t visiting Sears and Kmart stores in large enough numbers to generate the sales necessary to survive, so he has begun licensing his brands to third parties and allowing those companies to sell them at other retailers.

At the beginning of 2017, Lampert partnered with grill maker Permasteel to make Kenmore grills, small kitchen appliances, cookware, and other “brand-relevant adjacent products” that will then be sold through other retailers.

Then this summer, he made a deal with Amazon to start selling Kenmore home appliances paired with Sears’ home services offering on the e-commerce giant’s website. It marked the first time Sears would sell products directly through Amazon.

And before all of these, Lampert showed a streak of brilliance when he sold off the Craftsman tool brand to Stanley Black Decker for $900 million, but also retained the right to sell Craftsman tools in its stores and source them from other suppliers.

Of course, it was a tragedy that Sears had sunk to such depths that Lampert was forced to sell off Craftsman in the first place, but it was a deal that made the best out of a bad situation. Even though it does mean Sears may end up competing against itself.

An array of Craftsman hand tools and a red toolbox.

Image source: Sears Holdings.

Late is not better than never

On the one hand, Sears investors have a right to be thoroughly angry with Lampert for  overseeing the company while so much value was destroyed over the years, but then these blinding flashes of brilliance shine through, and it’s enough to make you think about what could have been.

But investors have to deal with what is, and that’s not a pretty picture. Reports keep surfacing of suppliers bailing on the retailer, which could make for a very bleak Christmas season. Without enough product to sell, the domino effect could chase customers away, leading to greater losses and more vendor nervousness.

Had only the Eddie Lampert of 2017 been around 10 years ago, even five, the demise of Sears might not feel so palpable. And there would be no need to look back wistfully on what could have been.

Category: Accessories  Tags: ,  Comments off

Eddie Lampert Makes More Smart Brand Deals for Sears Holdings …

The deals CEO Eddie Lampert has made for Sears Holdings Corp (NASDAQ:SHLD) in 2017 show what a crying shame it is he wasn’t as innovative earlier.

Sears recently announced two more deals for its Kenmore and DieHard brands, partnering with Cleva North America to produce Kenmore vacuums that will be sold at third-party stores and teaming up with Dorcy to make DieHard brand alkaline batteries. Coupled with the other major partnerships and deals struck earlier this year, had Lampert thought as creatively a few years ago, Sears might be a much more successful business today instead of one clinging by its fingertips to survive.

As great as these deals are, it may simply be a case of too little, too late.

A pile of alkaline batteries

Image source: Getty Images.

More brand extensions

Look at the deals Lampert made. In the case of Cleva, it will manufacture Kenmore and Kenmore Elite vacuums for distribution at retailers around the world, covering products from upright vacuums, stick vacuums, hand vacuums, and robotic vacuums to carpet cleaners, bare-floor cleaners, sweepers, and accessories.

With LED flashlight maker Dorcy, the DieHard deal will extend the car battery brand to other types of batteries as well as DieHard-branded flashlights. It’s almost a no-brainer and is very similar to Lampert’s decision to brand Sears’ auto service centers under the DieHard name. The Dorcy partnership will see DieHard batteries distributed in the U.S. and around the world through third-party retailers.

Lampert seems to have finally realized what it takes to save the company that he’s admirably sunk so much of his own money into, but it also comes with the understanding that Sears and Kmart are not the vehicles to do it.

DieHard auto service center

Image source: Sears Holdings.

Is Sears a licensing play?

The light bulb seemed to turn on earlier this year when Lampert first agreed to allow other companies to start selling Sears’ well-known brands. Customers just aren’t visiting Sears and Kmart stores in large enough numbers to generate the sales necessary to survive, so he has begun licensing his brands to third parties and allowing those companies to sell them at other retailers.

At the beginning of 2017, Lampert partnered with grill maker Permasteel to make Kenmore grills, small kitchen appliances, cookware, and other “brand-relevant adjacent products” that will then be sold through other retailers.

Then this summer, he made a deal with Amazon to start selling Kenmore home appliances paired with Sears’ home services offering on the e-commerce giant’s website. It marked the first time Sears would sell products directly through Amazon.

And before all of these, Lampert showed a streak of brilliance when he sold off the Craftsman tool brand to Stanley Black Decker for $900 million, but also retained the right to sell Craftsman tools in its stores and source them from other suppliers.

Of course, it was a tragedy that Sears had sunk to such depths that Lampert was forced to sell off Craftsman in the first place, but it was a deal that made the best out of a bad situation. Even though it does mean Sears may end up competing against itself.

An array of Craftsman hand tools and a red toolbox.

Image source: Sears Holdings.

Late is not better than never

On the one hand, Sears investors have a right to be thoroughly angry with Lampert for  overseeing the company while so much value was destroyed over the years, but then these blinding flashes of brilliance shine through, and it’s enough to make you think about what could have been.

But investors have to deal with what is, and that’s not a pretty picture. Reports keep surfacing of suppliers bailing on the retailer, which could make for a very bleak Christmas season. Without enough product to sell, the domino effect could chase customers away, leading to greater losses and more vendor nervousness.

Had only the Eddie Lampert of 2017 been around 10 years ago, even five, the demise of Sears might not feel so palpable. And there would be no need to look back wistfully on what could have been.

Category: Accessories  Tags: ,  Comments off

Rabbi Jordan Goldson and Beth Warren preach the joys of downtown living with simple, spacious Baton Rouge …

Rabbi Jordan Goldson and Beth Warren chose a downtown apartment for their new life together after they were married in January.

“We wanted to keep it simple,” said Goldson, spiritual leader of Congregation B’nai Israel since 2009.

“I’m a New Yorker,” added Warren, who moved to Baton Rouge in March. “I am used to apartment living.”

The couple leased a 1,700-square-foot loft on the eighth floor of a building on a downtown corner. Known for open spaces, high ceilings, concrete floors and exposed support beams, lofts are often found in converted commercial or industrial buildings like the Commerce Building, which was developed as an office building in 1955 by the late Wilbur Marvin, a longtime member of B’nai Israel. It was recently converted into 93 loft apartments. 

The newlyweds selected their apartment for the security, open spaces, breathtaking views of the Mississippi River and its size.

“I work from home,” said Warren, senior vice president of planning and design for a retail technology company. “I need a large space for work.”

Can’t see the video below? Click here

Because they share a car, Goldson and Warren like being close to so much activity. They are regulars at the farmers’ market, the Shaw Center for the Arts, downtown restaurants and the area’s museums. They love to walk on the levee and explore the local neighborhoods like Spanish Town. He loves to watch the barges working on the river.

“We have a little flavor of urban life,” Warren said. “The building is young with lots of professionals.”

The apartment opens to a hall off of which are two bedrooms, Warren’s office and the master bedroom. The hall leads to the large kitchen/dining room with a private patio balcony on the left. Behind the modern kitchen is the living room, decorated in grey, black and white with pops of color from the couple’s art and accessories. It’s a mix of mid century, old and new furniture.

“We combined our lives,” Warren said. “We have taken things from all of our lives, from the states and countries where we have lived.”

Although Warren brought much of the art with her from New York, the couple has collected some colorful local pieces, which balance the neutral backdrop of the natural concrete floors. The spaces are brightened with area rugs used throughout the apartment.

Because Warren lived in apartments for many years, she learned to collect only those things that have real meaning to her, like a sculpture of a brownstone, a wedding gift from friends. It’s on display on a marble column from Goldson’s grandmother. Another favorite piece is a fruitwood chest that also belonged to his grandmother.

“We are constantly changing things,” she said, “but we are decisive. When something new comes in, we have to give up something. We cycle though things, but we don’t throw them away. We donate them to people in need.”

One of their favorite things about the building is the rooftop patio with a pool, barbecue area and cabana with a television. It’s a busy gathering place, especially on the weekends. There are even plans for a rooftop restaurant in the future.

Goldson and Warren hope that downtown will continue to grow, especially with more retail.

“It’s not New York, but we think the downtown is ready for it,” Goldson said. “A lot is still experimental, but we are hoping more and more people will frequent the life here. We chose downtown because we wanted to be a part of the new emerging community.” 

Category: Accessories  Tags: ,  Comments off

The best-designed kitchen accessories of the year – Business Insider

Bennett Raglin / Stringer / Getty Images

Off-the-shelf blenders and toasters can be useful, but as products they aren’t often all that inspired.

For people who want to take their kitchens into a more stylized realm, the International Design Excellence Awards, put on by IDSA, are a good place to start.

The awards showcase dozens of products that have achieved feats of design, including consumer gadgets, industrial tools, children’s toys, and more. Only a fraction of those won top honors for their ingenuity and beauty at this year’s show in August.

Here are a handful of the kitchen accessories IDSA considered worthy.

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Bursts of color distinguish this mid-century modern Highlands condo – The Courier

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This funky condo in the Original Highlands is slathered with bright hues. Slap on your sunglasses and view the colorful space for yourself!
Robert Shipman IV/ The Courier Journal/ USA TODAY Network/Wochit

Ron Hopper’s condo, tucked behind Baxter Avenue in the Original Highlands, is “a happy space. I’ve always had a good eye for color,” he said. 

Drawing from mid-century modern and art deco styles, Ron has combined colors – like a fire engine red seen throughout the house – to create a fun, funky spot for both relaxing and entertaining. 

But he’s done it with attention to detail – such as choosing the right size furniture for his 996 square foot hideaway – and has finished several renovations along the way. He’s also added thrifty finds from around Kentuckiana each with a story of the hunt. 

Check out these homes

Renovated Victorian home in La Grange is timeless with eclectic twist

Vintage jewelry store renovated into modern loft in downtown New Albany

AN EYE FOR COLOR 

A painting titled “Windswept” by Linzi Lynn – depicting a woman with wavy, rainbow hair – served as Ron’s inspiration for decorating his home. Its fiery orange and red tones can be found in a tufted leather chair – opposite the painting hanging above his mantle – and in the rainbow rug that covers the living room. Its earthy colors are seen in a green tufted ottoman and couch topped with rainbow polka dot and sequin pillows.

Curved yellow and red lounge chairs and lime green, red and yellow bar stools in the kitchen accentuate the mid-century modern look. Art deco vibes come into play in paintings with stark shapes above the living room’s couch and in a Gatsby-like flapper statue on the mantle. 


Category: Accessories  Tags: ,  Comments off

5 of the best-designed kitchen accessories of the year

Bennett Raglin / Stringer / Getty Images

Off-the-shelf blenders and toasters can be useful, but as products they aren’t often all that inspired.

For people who want to take their kitchens into a more stylized realm, the International Design Excellence Awards, put on by IDSA, are a good place to start.

The awards showcase dozens of products that have achieved feats of design, including consumer gadgets, industrial tools, children’s toys, and more. Only a fraction of those won top honors for their ingenuity and beauty at this year’s show in August.

Here are a handful of the kitchen accessories IDSA considered worthy.

Category: Accessories  Tags: ,  Comments off