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Get A Bunch Of Pots, Pans And Utensils For Not A Bunch Of Money

Presumably, you or someone in your household cooks. If that’s the case, as it is for almost everyone, then you need certainly need a bunch of cookware. You know, like pots and pans and stuff. And should you find yourself without the necessary equipment, you’ll find how expensive these items are regularly priced. (Just ask any young adult moving into a dorm room or first apartment).

That doesn’t have to be the case, if you know where to look. This popular 15-piece cookware set is currently 49 percent off. So instead of $90, it will only cost you $46. Much, much more reasonable.

You can save $52 on this cookware set (Photo via Amazon)

You can save $44 on this cookware set (Photo via Amazon)

Vremi 15-Piece Nonstick Cookware Set on sale for $37.99

Like I said, this set is popular: Nearly 70 percent of the 1,794 customers who reviewed it gave it 5 out of 5 stars.

Furthermore, it really does come with every basic item a cook ever needs in the kitchen: two saucepans with lids, two dutch ovens with lids, two frypans and five nonstick cooking utensils. All for three bucks a piece.

This popular cookware set is over half off (Photo via Amazon)

Have a suggestion for a cool product or great deal that you think Daily Caller readers need to know about? Email the Daily Dealer at [email protected].  

Follow The Daily Dealer on Twitter and Facebook

Follow Jack on Twitter

The Daily Caller is devoted to showing you things that you’ll like or find interesting. We do have partnerships with affiliates, so The Daily Caller may get a small share of the revenue from any purchase.

Category: Cookware Pots  Tags: ,  Comments off

Kroger Marketplace opens in Southgate

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World’s first combo IHOP/Applebee’s coming to Detroit | 0:42

IHOP/Applebee’s restaurant is scheduled to open in spring 2018 in downtown Detroit.
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Lions 24, Giants 10: The five biggest plays | 0:35

We take a look at the five biggest plays from the Lions’ 24-10 win over the Giants on Monday, Sept. 18, 2017. Video by Marlowe Alter, Detroit Free Press.
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North Farmington students gain internet fame over senior IDs | 0:55

Seniors at the school each year are allowed to pose for ID photos dressed in crazy costumes and this year they dressed as their favorite celebrity, movie character or meme.
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Iraqi ICE detainees seek pardons from Gov. Rick Snyder | 0:39

Iraqi and Chaldean residents detained by Immigration and Customs Enforcement have applied for pardons for state violations from Gov. Rick Snyder as they try to avoid deportation back to Iraq.
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Manor house has personality and surprises | 0:42

This rambling Tudor manor house is 93 years old with a powerful personality and a wealth of surprises.
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Michigan Central Station: A look inside the long-vacant building | 16:42

The view from inside long-vacant Michigan Central Station.
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Follow the truck that feeds Detroit’s poorest neighborhoods | 15:13

The Salvation Army’s Bed and Bread truck brings free meals to the hungry and the poor, right in the neighborhoods where they live.

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The Detroit Free Press/Chemical Bank Marathon will happen in downtown Detroit on Oct. 14-15.
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  • World's first combo IHOP/Applebee's coming to Detroit
  • Lions 24, Giants 10: The five biggest plays
  • North Farmington students gain internet fame over senior IDs
  • Iraqi ICE detainees seek pardons from Gov. Rick Snyder
  • Manor house has personality and surprises
  • Michigan Central Station: A look inside the long-vacant building
  • Follow the truck that feeds Detroit's poorest neighborhoods
  • 10 coolest things to see at Little Caesars Arena
  • What you need to know about the Detroit Free Press Marathon

Doors open at 8 a.m. Wednesday at Kroger’s newest Marketplace location in Southgate.

Located at 16705 Fort St. in a long-vacant space formerly occupied by a Super Kmart, the store is the fifth Kroger Marketplace in southeast Michigan.  

At 149,000 square feet, it is also the largest of the all of Kroger’s Michigan Marketplace stores. Most non-Marketplace stores average 40,000 to 60,000 square feet, according to Rachel Hurst, corporate affairs manager for the Kroger Company of Michigan.

On opening day, the first 400 shoppers to enter the store receive a reusable shopping bag and a $10 Kroger gift card. Throughout the day there will be product sampling, specials and family entertainment.

Read more:

Celebrity chef Roger Mooking will be at the store from 8 a.m. to noon for a cooking demo. 

Kroger says this new store represents a $19 million investment in the Southgate community. The new store is the single largest retail development in the city’s 60-year history, according to Mayor Joseph Kuspa.

“We are excited to see the investment,” said Kuspa at today’s ribbon-cutting. “We are pleased they found Southgate was the place to be and made the commitment.”

Kroger Marketplace stores feature a larger selection of traditional groceries as well as home goods, small appliances, toys, apparel, kitchen items and baby items.  On one side of an aisle there is a wall of kitchen gadgetry, cookware and bakeware. Opposite there are appliances, from KitchenAid mixers to coffee pots and panini makers. 

“I believe shoppers will be surprised and delighted with the variety of foods and other products they will find in one location,” said Marc Jean, Southgate Kroger Marketplace store manager, in a press release.  “Many customers are pressed for time and the bright new Kroger Marketplace store offers the convenience of purchasing a range of foods, everyday, gift and seasonal items under one roof.”

Inside the new store, the Café features a sushi bar and a Pan Asian food bar and a deli. There is a large seafood and meat department. At the bakery, customers can use the electric bread slicer to slice a loaf of bread. 

This Kroger also offers ClickList, the online grocery ordering service, starting Sept. 27. 

There’s a pharmacy, large floral department and a Michigan First Credit Union location.  A fuel center is expected to open at the end of October.  

This store will employ more than 300, a mix of full and part-timers, with many transferring from the Kroger store on Eureka road in Southgate which officially closed today.

Other Kroger Marketplace locations include Royal Oak, White Lake Township and two in Shelby Township. In 2013, a Kroger Marketplace opened in in Lambertville, near the Ohio border, but that is considered part of Kroger’s Ohio division, according Hurst corporate.

Regular business at the Southgate stores will be 6 a.m.-midnight daily. 

Contact Susan Selasky at 313-222-6872 or sselasky@freepress.com. Follow @SusanMariecooks on Twitter.

Category: Cookware Pots  Tags: ,  Comments off

The cookware industry heats up




The field notes examining the eating habits of the young and modern foodie might read as follows: 

The species shops at Whole Foods and orders meal kits from Blue Apron, scans Food52.com for recipe ideas, and then documents dishes on social media before consumption. But a strange discrepancy arises when you survey members of the species in their natural habitat. Examine the kitchen in any post-college apartment, and you’ll find a cross-section of cookware that is more castoff than cast iron, with a selection of pots and pans that tend to be culled from parents’ basements and trips to Target and Ikea. 

Advertisement

Although these twentysomething foodies openly obsess over their food, they are generally clueless about the cookware needed to actually prepare their meals. And that has led some in the industry to see an opportunity, with brands emerging (or evolving) to serve them in the most literal sense of the word — by creating new product lines designed with the deep-pocketed millennial in mind. 

The coming “disruption’’ of cookware is a logical extension of the shifts we’re seeing across the food industry, as young adults devote an extraordinary amount of “money and resources and time” to new ways of sourcing their meals, said Jonathan “Jake” Kalick, whose family owns Harbour Food Service, a Boston distributor of restaurant equipment. 

Although his generation loves eating well, “they don’t know the tools or care about the quality” of their kitchen supplies, he said. He and friend Bradford “Chip” Malt saw an opportunity in this discrepancy and this month launched Made In, a company making pots and pans for young urban professionals. 

The frypans and stockpots, which are designed by a Tennessee-based manufacturer, offer the same quality 5-ply construction as high-end brands like All-Clad and Calphalon, Malt said. But Made In aims to undercut their prices by selling them direct-to-consumer through its website. The company sells a stainless steel 10-inch frying pan for $79; a similar pan from All-Clad retails for $150.

“Our goal is to become the go-to brand in the kitchen space for millennials,” Malt said.

Advertisement


“The millennial age group has the most purchasing power of any demographic in the US, and it’s also growing as fast or faster than any other age group,” said Taylor Palmer, a retail analyst at IBISWorld.

Pair that purchasing power with the fact that many millennials are hitting a stage in life when they’re setting up home, and it’s a compelling force for commerce. US kitchen and cookware stores already account for $15.2 billion in annual sales, and that’s just from specialized stores like Williams Sonoma and Sur La Table, not mass-market retailers like Macy’s or Bed Bath Beyond, he said. The result has been a surge in saucepan sales.

 “Cookware is very hot right now,” said Joe Derochowski, NPD Group’s home industry analyst, with sales up 9 percent this year, after a 6 percent rise the year prior.

The reason, Derochowski said, is a confluence of demographic shifts. Yes, millennials are beginning to settle down, establish homes, and increasingly invest in kitchen goods, but at the same time, baby boomers are beginning to downsize and are happy to unload a pantry full of scratched-up pans in favor of something new. 

On top of that, both generations are cooking more to respond to health concerns, he said, leading to a market that hasn’t seen such an uptick in sales since the 1970s.

Nicholas Pfosi for The Boston Globe

Made In cookware

Williams Sonoma, in particular, has seen its stock price increase lately, and was up 1.9 percent in revenues in its second quarter of this year. The company’s chief executive, Laura Alber, has said the brand is in the midst of a “refresh” designed to meet these demographic demands.

“If you looked at our assortment a couple of years ago, we offered mostly stainless-steel and copper cookware,” said Lauren Tarzia, a company spokeswoman. “Now, in response to customer demand, we offer specialty, induction, nonstick and ceramic nonstick” pans, in addition to a line of Williams Sonoma private-label cookware at a lower price point. 

Where and how cookware purchases are made is also changing. Eighteen percent of sales are now made online, up from 14 percent in 2015, according to NPD Group, with home decor sites like Boston-based Wayfair and Overstock increasingly competing with Amazon for eyeballs. 

And those shopping options continue to evolve. Instacart users can buy measuring cups or foil pans when they put in an order for groceries, and the meal-kit company Blue Apron has its own marketplace, allowing users not only to purchase boxes of ingredients, but the knives, pans, and, yes, blue aprons to use in the kitchen. The company’s cofounder and chief executive, Matt Salzberg, has said it plans to expand these “a la carte” offerings over time.

Even Buzzfeed is dabbling in the culinary marketplace, selling a Bluetooth-enabled hot plate and a cookbook of popular recipes.

Unlike other home goods, kitchen supplies and cookware have relatively stable year-round demand and are rarely subject to the economy’s ebbs and flows, Palmer said. 

According to a 2016 Harris poll, 97 percent of Americans cook once a week, and nearly a third of the population cooks daily. 

But although everyone, in theory, needs a pan to fry with, carving out a place for a new cookware company presents challenges. 

“It’s a really fragmented market, from a brand standpoint,” said AJ Riedel, a housewares analyst at Riedel Group, with more than two dozen different brands, only four of which have more than a 10 percent market share. She said that although Calphalon used to hold a certain reputation with at-home cooks, its prominence has faded. “There’s no aspirational brand,” she said. 

What’s more, understanding the nuances of what makes a good pan — and why you should pay a premium for it — confuses the average consumer, who is probably thrown by questions about the safety of a nonstick coating or the virtues of cast iron or copper. “Even I don’t totally understand cookware,” Riedel said. “It’s still that confusing.”

Which is why, she said, that Made In’s model might have some promise, if it puts an emphasis on educating consumers through its website. There’s evidence that younger shoppers are apt to do research and comparison-shop online before making a purchase, and they’re drawn in by brands that make a strong play on social media and tell a compelling story.

Both Riedel and Palmer pointed to Casper Mattresses and Tuft Needle, two mattress startups that have experienced success with the direct-to-consumer model. They found it compelling that no one had stepped up in the cookware industry to do the same until Made In came along. 

“The direct-to-consumer space in retail is on fire,” Palmer said. “The fact that no one has entered into it with a cookware concept is kind of baffling.”

Malt and Kalick said their intention with Made In is to create a community of cooks and become a “voice in the industry” and an educational source for their users. The company hopes to bring in chefs across the country as equity partners in hopes of building the brand. And the partnership with the Tennessee manufacturer is intentional, because young consumers care about goods being American-made. 

But Made In is not alone in the market. The company Misen, which raised more than $1 million on Kickstarter to create a line of direct-to-consumer chef’s knives, announced plans this month to branch out into pots and pans. And Riedel said it’s likely that others will follow. “There are really no barriers to entry, but somebody else could come in right behind them and outspend them.”

Derochowski agreed. “Knowing that this is a hot industry, there is going to be a lot of competition,” he said. 

Janelle Nanos can be reached at janelle.nanos@globe.com and @janellenanos on Twitter.

Category: Cookware Pots  Tags: ,  Comments off

This One-Day-Only Deal On Cookware Includes The #1 Most Popular Set

The Daily Dealer has said it before, and the Daily Dealer will say it again – cookware is ridiculously expensive. Anytime I see a discount opportunity on pots or pans, I get excited. Such is the case today, September 19, in which there is a one-day-only sale on cookware from Bulbhead. This deal includes a pasta pot, a brownie pan, and Amazon’s #1 bestselling “kitchen cookware set.”

Normally $100, this 10-piece cookware set is 25 percent off today (Photo via Amazon)

Normally $100, this bestselling 10-piece cookware set is 25 percent off today (Photo via Amazon)

Red Copper 10pc Ceramic Cookware Set by Bulbhead on sale for $74.99

Normally $20, this pasta pot is 25 percent off today (Photo via Amazon)

Normally $20, this pasta pot is 25 percent off today (Photo via Amazon)

Red Copper Better Pasta Pot by BulbHead on sale for $14.99

Normally $20, this brownie pan is 25 percent off today (Photo via Amazon)

Normally $20, this brownie pan is 25 percent off today (Photo via Amazon)

Red Copper Brownie Bonanza Pan by Bulbhead on sale for $14.99

The cookware set (the first product listed) includes an 8-inch fry pan, a 10-inch fry pan with lid, a 1.5-quart saucepan with lid, a 2.5-quart saucepan with lid, and an aluminum steamer insert. The pasta pot includes a straining lid and a recipe guide. And the brownie pan comes with the baking pan, a divider tray, a lifting tray, a brownie stand and a recipe guide.

This comes as part of the bestselling cookware set (Photo via Amazon)

This comes as part of the bestselling cookware set (Photo via Amazon)

Have a suggestion for a cool product or great deal that you think Daily Caller readers need to know about? Email the Daily Dealer at [email protected].  

Follow The Daily Dealer on Twitter and Facebook

Follow Jack on Twitter

The Daily Caller is devoted to showing you things that you’ll like or find interesting. We do have partnerships with affiliates, so The Daily Caller may get a small share of the revenue from any purchase.

Category: Cookware Pots  Tags: ,  Comments off

Millennials are foodies but don’t have pans to prove it, company says




The field notes examining the eating habits of the young and modern foodie might read as follows: 

The species shops at Whole Foods and orders meal kits from Blue Apron, scans Food52.com for recipe ideas, and then documents dishes on social media before consumption. But a strange discrepancy arises when you survey members of the species in their natural habitat. Examine the kitchen in any post-college apartment, and you’ll find a cross-section of cookware that is more castoff than cast iron, with a selection of pots and pans that tend to be culled from parents’ basements and trips to Target and Ikea. 

Advertisement

Although these twentysomething foodies openly obsess over their food, they are generally clueless about the cookware needed to actually prepare their meals. And that has led some in the industry to see an opportunity, with brands emerging (or evolving) to serve them in the most literal sense of the word — by creating new product lines designed with the deep-pocketed millennial in mind. 

The coming “disruption’’ of cookware is a logical extension of the shifts we’re seeing across the food industry, as young adults devote an extraordinary amount of “money and resources and time” to new ways of sourcing their meals, said Jonathan “Jake” Kalick, whose family owns Harbour Food Service, a Boston distributor of restaurant equipment. 

Although his generation loves eating well, “they don’t know the tools or care about the quality” of their kitchen supplies, he said. He and friend Bradford “Chip” Malt saw an opportunity in this discrepancy and this month launched Made In, a company making pots and pans for young urban professionals. 

The frypans and stockpots, which are designed by a Tennessee-based manufacturer, offer the same quality 5-ply construction as high-end brands like All-Clad and Calphalon, Malt said. But Made In aims to undercut their prices by selling them direct-to-consumer through its website. The company sells a stainless steel 10-inch frying pan for $79; a similar pan from All-Clad retails for $150.

“Our goal is to become the go-to brand in the kitchen space for millennials,” Malt said.

Advertisement


“The millennial age group has the most purchasing power of any demographic in the US, and it’s also growing as fast or faster than any other age group,” said Taylor Palmer, a retail analyst at IBISWorld.

Pair that purchasing power with the fact that many millennials are hitting a stage in life when they’re setting up home, and it’s a compelling force for commerce. US kitchen and cookware stores already account for $15.2 billion in annual sales, and that’s just from specialized stores like Williams Sonoma and Sur La Table, not mass-market retailers like Macy’s or Bed Bath Beyond, he said. The result has been a surge in saucepan sales.

 “Cookware is very hot right now,” said Joe Derochowski, NPD Group’s home industry analyst, with sales up 9 percent this year, after a 6 percent rise the year prior.

The reason, Derochowski said, is a confluence of demographic shifts. Yes, millennials are beginning to settle down, establish homes, and increasingly invest in kitchen goods, but at the same time, baby boomers are beginning to downsize and are happy to unload a pantry full of scratched-up pans in favor of something new. 

On top of that, both generations are cooking more to respond to health concerns, he said, leading to a market that hasn’t seen such an uptick in sales since the 1970s.

Nicholas Pfosi for The Boston Globe

Made In cookware

Williams Sonoma, in particular, has seen its stock price increase lately, and was up 1.9 percent in revenues in its second quarter of this year. The company’s chief executive, Laura Alber, has said the brand is in the midst of a “refresh” designed to meet these demographic demands.

“If you looked at our assortment a couple of years ago, we offered mostly stainless-steel and copper cookware,” said Lauren Tarzia, a company spokeswoman. “Now, in response to customer demand, we offer specialty, induction, nonstick and ceramic nonstick” pans, in addition to a line of Williams Sonoma private-label cookware at a lower price point. 

Where and how cookware purchases are made is also changing. Eighteen percent of sales are now made online, up from 14 percent in 2015, according to NPD Group, with home decor sites like Boston-based Wayfair and Overstock increasingly competing with Amazon for eyeballs. 

And those shopping options continue to evolve. Instacart users can buy measuring cups or foil pans when they put in an order for groceries, and the meal-kit company Blue Apron has its own marketplace, allowing users not only to purchase boxes of ingredients, but the knives, pans, and, yes, blue aprons to use in the kitchen. The company’s cofounder and chief executive, Matt Salzberg, has said it plans to expand these “a la carte” offerings over time.

Even Buzzfeed is dabbling in the culinary marketplace, selling a Bluetooth-enabled hot plate and a cookbook of popular recipes.

Unlike other home goods, kitchen supplies and cookware have relatively stable year-round demand and are rarely subject to the economy’s ebbs and flows, Palmer said. 

According to a 2016 Harris poll, 97 percent of Americans cook once a week, and nearly a third of the population cooks daily. 

But although everyone, in theory, needs a pan to fry with, carving out a place for a new cookware company presents challenges. 

“It’s a really fragmented market, from a brand standpoint,” said AJ Riedel, a housewares analyst at Riedel Group, with more than two dozen different brands, only four of which have more than a 10 percent market share. She said that although Calphalon used to hold a certain reputation with at-home cooks, its prominence has faded. “There’s no aspirational brand,” she said. 

What’s more, understanding the nuances of what makes a good pan — and why you should pay a premium for it — confuses the average consumer, who is probably thrown by questions about the safety of a nonstick coating or the virtues of cast iron or copper. “Even I don’t totally understand cookware,” Riedel said. “It’s still that confusing.”

Which is why, she said, that Made In’s model might have some promise, if it puts an emphasis on educating consumers through its website. There’s evidence that younger shoppers are apt to do research and comparison-shop online before making a purchase, and they’re drawn in by brands that make a strong play on social media and tell a compelling story.

Both Riedel and Palmer pointed to Casper Mattresses and Tuft Needle, two mattress startups that have experienced success with the direct-to-consumer model. They found it compelling that no one had stepped up in the cookware industry to do the same until Made In came along. 

“The direct-to-consumer space in retail is on fire,” Palmer said. “The fact that no one has entered into it with a cookware concept is kind of baffling.”

Malt and Kalick said their intention with Made In is to create a community of cooks and become a “voice in the industry” and an educational source for their users. The company hopes to bring in chefs across the country as equity partners in hopes of building the brand. And the partnership with the Tennessee manufacturer is intentional, because young consumers care about goods being American-made. 

But Made In is not alone in the market. The company Misen, which raised more than $1 million on Kickstarter to create a line of direct-to-consumer chef’s knives, announced plans this month to branch out into pots and pans. And Riedel said it’s likely that others will follow. “There are really no barriers to entry, but somebody else could come in right behind them and outspend them.”

Derochowski agreed. “Knowing that this is a hot industry, there is going to be a lot of competition,” he said. 

Janelle Nanos can be reached at janelle.nanos@globe.com and @janellenanos on Twitter.

Category: Cookware Pots  Tags: ,  Comments off

The Purpose of Camping – Tri

I was recently reminded what the purpose of camping is when my husband, daughter and I visited my brother and his young family at their campsite in a Custer State Park campground over Labor Day weekend.

When our kids when were younger camping had a totally different meaning for them than it did for my husband and me. Campground camping gave my husband a taste of suburban life with neighbors all around him and renewed his appreciation for rural living. For me camping meant a lot of work before, during, and after: packing, preparing food all day, constantly cleaning up the campsite, hand washing cookware, having raw hands creased with black from sooty pots and pans, and unpacking once home.

The whole purpose of camping to our kids was the campfire. A nearby lake for swimming was only important when they took a break from the fire. Campfires aren’t allowed on Forest Service land except in designated campgrounds with fire pits, so we resorted to a lot of campground camping in order to appease our kids.

Upon arriving, our kids would begin their inquiries about when we could have a campfire. Observing them around an open fire was like watching puppies fixated with the food on someone’s plate. Our kids wouldn’t go anywhere as long as there was a campfire they could stare into and poke a stick at.

It amazed me that all our kids really needed to be content was a kid chair, a long stick, flaming logs and hot coals to stir. Once a fire was going, our kids’ first order of camping business was finding their personal “fire stick” which got used throughout the weekend. They’d each find a branch long enough to reach the fire from their camp chair and would leave it next to the fire pit for later use. All weekend they’d poke at the campfire with their stick. They especially loved pointing its hot end in the air and as they waved it around, they’d watch the smoke as it drifted from its smoldering tip or would repeatedly admire its red hot end as it glowed in the dark.

Campfires kept our kids corralled and nothing quieted and calmed them faster or more than getting a fire going. Sibling arguments dissipated around the campfire, unless of course one of them took or moved or burned up the other’s fire stick on accident.

The fire almost always had their rapt attention; leaving them speechless much of the time. They stayed occupied for hours. Whether they were infants intrigued by watching the flames of the fire or youngsters fixated with campfire maintenance, they wouldn’t go anywhere if there was a fire blazing in the campfire ring.

For our son, camping was about the entire campfire process: preparing, starting, building, maintaining, using and extinguishing the campfire. He’d help gather the firewood at home for taking with us. He wanted to help chop the firewood logs into smaller chunks and make the kindling – using Dad’s little hand axe while supervised. He’d volunteer to get the fire started and always got up to add more wood to the fire when he thought it was dying out. He’d stir the fire to revive it and liked extinguishing the fire before bedtime.

Our kids loved utilizing the campfire also. They’d warm up in the morning with hot cocoa by the fire, line dry their wet swim clothes and towels by the fire, cook their own hotdogs, or whittle a stick into a pile of shavings by the fire. They’d roast marshmallows for s’mores of relatives who came out to visit us, help cook bacon and eggs in the frying pan over the fire, and be in charge of burning all the paper garbage so they could watch it shrivel up as it burned.

In retrospect, even though we took a lot of extra stuff in order to have one, campfires were some of our best and cheapest investments for entertaining our kids.

Category: Cookware Pots  Tags: ,  Comments off

You can upgrade your kitchen aesthetic with this stainless cookware set that’s only $130

— Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. However, our picks and opinions are independent from USA TODAY’s newsroom and any business incentives.

Is your cookware showing signs of wear? Loose pot handles, scratched cooking surfaces, stains that wan’t come off? Nonstick surfaces that don’t live up their name? Frying pans with impossible hot spots?

If any of that sounded familiar to you, maybe it’s time to make a change.

Right now, you can get a 12-piece Cuisinart stainless steel set from Amazon for $129.99.

Note: They have the list price set at $465, but this set actually sells for a little more than $150 usually. While saving $20-$30 is not as impressive as the $230 savings it looks like you’re getting, we still think this is a deal worth exploring.

What comes in the set

You can basically replace all your usual cookware with this set, which includes seven pots and pans, and five lids.
• 1-quart sauce pan with glass lid
• 2-quart sauce pan with glass lid
• 3-quart sauté pan with glass lid and helper handle (so you can grab it from both sides)
• 6-quart stock pot with glass lid
• 10-inch skillet (stock pot lid fits this too)
• 8-inch skillet
• 4-quart Dutch oven with glass lid

Perks of stainless steel

This entire set of cookware is oven-safe up to 350-degrees Fahrenheit. Yes, even the glass lids! (I know, right?) The pots and pans can handle up to 500 degrees, perfect for finishing a one-pan meal. And if you even need to freeze something, there’s no need to dirty another container. These suckers are freezer friendly (but who actually has that kind of freezer space?).

Ready for a better cooking experience? Get the Cuisinart set for $129.99 from Amazon.

Prices are accurate at the time of publication, but may change over time.

Category: Cookware Pots  Tags: ,  Comments off